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The Urban Homestead® - A City Farm, Sustainable Living & Resource Center, A Path to Freedom towards Self-Sufficiency

The Urban Homestead® - A City Farm, Sustainable Living & Resource Center, A Path to Freedom towards Self-Sufficiency
Surrounded by urban sprawl and just a short distance from a freeway, the Urban Homestead project is a family operated and highly productive city farm. It is also a successful, real-life working model for sustainable agriculture and eco living in urban areas and has been featured in multiple news medias both nationally and internationally. Our work in creating Urban Homesteading as a flourishing and self-sufficient lifestyle using minimum resources and land has been referenced as a progressive and forward-thinking example and sourced as the representation of future city planning and reclamation worldwide. For over a decade, we have proved that growing ones' own food can be sustainable, practical, successful and beautiful in urban areas. We harvest 3 tons of organic food annually from our 1/10 acre garden while incorporating many back-to-basics practices, solar energy and biodiesel in order to reduce our footprint on the earth’s resources.

http://urbanhomestead.org/

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Andrew D. Blechman - author of LEISUREVILLE and PIGEONS LEISUREVILLE Adventures in a World Without Children From the author of Pigeons comes a first-hand look at America’s senior utopias, gated retirement communities where no kids are allowed. When his next-door neighbors in a quaint New England town suddenly pick up and move to a gated retirement community in Florida called “The Villages,” Blechman is astonished by their stories, so he goes to investigate. Larger than Manhattan, with a golf course for every day of the month, two downtowns, its own newspaper, radio, and TV stations, The Villages is a city of nearly one hundred thousand (and growing), missing only one thing: children.

Vertical vermiponics: research project combines worms with hydroponics The practices of hydroponics, aquaponics and windowfarming (which allows urban folks to grow food vertically using their home windows) and vermicomposting (creating compost with worms) have become familiar ideas to many green-minded people for some time now. But what about adding worms to the windowfarming equation? Professor Ken Rinaldo, director of the art and technology department at Ohio State University's School of Architecture, has combined aspects of these practices in an experimental research project called Cascading Gardens. Seen over at Inhabitat, the project employs what is called vermiponics, where worm waste is used to fertilize veggies.

Acacia Acacia (/əˈkeɪʃə/ or /əˈkeɪsiə/), known commonly as acacia, thorntree, whistling thorn, or wattle, is a genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae, described by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1773 based on the African species Acacia nilotica. Many non-Australian species tend to be thorny, whereas the majority of Australian acacias are not. All species are pod-bearing, with sap and leaves often bearing large amounts of tannins and condensed tannins that historically found use as pharmaceuticals and preservatives. The generic name derives from ἀκακία (akakia), the name given by early Greek botanist-physician Pedanius Dioscorides (middle to late first century) to the medicinal tree A. nilotica in his book Materia Medica.[2] This name derives from the Greek word for its characteristic thorns, ἀκίς (akis; "thorn").[3] The species name nilotica was given by Linnaeus from this tree's best-known range along the Nile river. Classification[edit]

Notes from the Psychedelic Salon » Quotes, comments, and audio files from Lorenzo's podcasts Guest speaker: Terence McKennaListen Download Subscribe MP3 Free PCs – Right click, select option Macs – Ctrl-Click, select option Terence McKenna [NOTE: All quotations are by Terence McKenna.] Visiting the Bakhtiarias nomads in Iran - Part 1 of 2 Photo. Nice people from the Bakhtiari nomads. The Bakhtiari nomads living high up in the mountain hillsides. The scenery with snow capped summits in the background was something for itself! © Travel Explorations.

5 ways to get the most out of backyard chickens Chickens give us eggs, and those eggs are a great source of high-quality protein. But they can also give us so much more. Below are some innovative ideas from backyard and small-scale commercial chicken keepers that may help chooks to reach their full, productive potential. Hay vs. Straw – What’s The Difference? Hay and straw seem very similar on the surface, but they are actually quite different; each one ideal for its own thing. For example, hay is a feed, while straw is a byproduct, and although both can be used for bedding, straw is the better choice. It’s important to know these differences before working with straw and hay, so here’s a little help. Origin: – Straw is made from the leftover shafts of grains like rye, oats, and wheat, after the seed heads have been cut off. – Hay is often the combination of several grasses and grains like alfalfa, brome, and timothy; clover and rye are often components. Hay is cut when it’s source is still green, capturing nutrients in the cut-off plants.

RAWIllumination.net Page 13, "we're closer to the pet shop here," to Page 23, "rather close to the Weatherman faction." I'm using quotes as well as page numbers to make things easier for folks who may be using ebooks. -- The Mgt. This is the section in which Saul Goodman and Barney Muldoon begin examining the memos to Joseph Malik, editor of "Confrontation" magazine, giving background to the magazine's mysterious Illuminati project. Most of the references in the memos are quite straightforward, and even now, when interest in the Illuminati seems to be continuing, looking up the references in the memos is a good way to research the alleged secret society.

Bakhtiari - ETHNONYMNS: none The term "Bakhtiari" refers to a group of people and to the area they occupy. The Bakhtiari inhabit about 156,000 square kilometers in and near the central Zagros Mountains of Iran. The most recent estimates place their population at about 700,000 in the 1980s. The Bakhtiari are traditionally nomadic pastoralists who make their winter encampments in the low hills along the narrow fringe of the northeast Khūzestān plain and their summer pastures in the intermontane valleys. Some also find summer pastures at the western edge of the central plateau, which is also the permanent habitat for a sedentary village population.

The Tiny Project: "Less house! More Life!" You know that tiny houses have become a big thing when they are actually randomly passing each other on the highway. Here you see Alek Lisefski's Tiny Project passing a Tumbleweed Tiny House, as he moves to California. © The Tiny Project Alex has built a tiny house with a lot of big ideas. He is a web designer by trade but has " a passion for the visual arts, the great outdoors, architecture, and all things natural and beautiful."

Five Tips for Yardfarmers from The Market Gardener » Yardfarmers “Local agriculture does have the power to transform society, and I believe that ultimately it will.” – Jean-Martin Fortier Jean-Martin Fortier would be the first to tell you that the small family farm is not dead. Far from it. In an age when the “bigger is better” mentality has thoroughly pervaded the farming landscape, a small but growing group of farmers have bucked that trend, and have achieved remarkable success operating on a much smaller scale. It seems that small may just be the next big thing. The pond at Les Jardins de La Grelinette (from Jean-Martin Fortier)

Knowledge and civilization Aj Sak Teles, Late Classic Mayan Lord Last night, my friend David pointed out an interesting passage in in search of the miraculous, in which Gurdjieff tells Ouspensky a number of interesting things about the nature of knowledge. Gurdjieff, of course, drew a clear distinction between knowledge and understanding, but this particular passage makes it clear that he, like Ibn Arabi, thought knowledge to be an inestimably valuable substance: an essential factor in the culture of man. The very nearly anti-intellectual stance which one frequently encounters in the Gurdjieff work stands in stark contrast to the appreciation for the intellect which is actually needed in order to conduct any serious spiritual work.

Dare to Be Different and Follow Your Heart Not the Crowd To dare to be different is to live your life your own way. Following your heart rather than following the crowd gives you much more chance to find happiness and fulfillment, but it takes courage. Many people are afraid of being different, of not being accepted by those around them, and of standing out rather than blending in. The truth of the matter is that we are all different. Vermiponics roundup: The beauty of worms in hydroponic gardens (Video) We know the benefits of hydroponic gardening, aquaponics and vermicomposting, and how practices like these can help the home gardener grow more food efficiently. Vermiponics combines the best of the three in a self-sustaining mini-ecosystem, using the castings of red wriggler worms as fertilizer. The idea is that the cultivated plants and worms mutually benefit each other, much like the fish would in an aquaponic system.

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