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Just in time (business)

Just in time (business)
Just in time (JIT) is a production strategy that strives to improve a business' return on investment by reducing in-process inventory and associated carrying costs. To meet JIT objectives, the process relies on signals or Kanban (看板?, Kanban) between different points, which are involved in the process, which tell production when to make the next part. Kanban are usually 'tickets' but can be simple visual signals, such as the presence or absence of a part on a shelf. JIT relies on other elements in the inventory chain as well. The philosophy of JIT is simple: the storage of unused inventory is a waste of resources. Inventory is seen as incurring costs, or waste, instead of adding and storing value, contrary to traditional accounting. In short, the Just-in-Time inventory system focus is having “the right material, at the right time, at the right place, and in the exact amount”, without the safety net of inventory. JIT helps in keeping inventory to minimum in a firm. Reduced setup time. Related:  Just In Time Manufacturing

Lean manufacturing Overview[edit] The difference between these two approaches is not the goal itself, but rather the prime approach to achieving it. The implementation of smooth flow exposes quality problems that already existed, and thus waste reduction naturally happens as a consequence. The advantage claimed for this approach is that it naturally takes a system-wide perspective, whereas a waste focus sometimes wrongly assumes this perspective. Both lean and TPS can be seen as a loosely connected set of potentially competing principles whose goal is cost reduction by the elimination of waste.[5] These principles include: Pull processing, Perfect first-time quality, Waste minimization, Continuous improvement, Flexibility, Building and maintaining a long term relationship with suppliers, Autonomation, Load leveling and Production flow and Visual control. Origins[edit] Lean aims to make the work simple enough to understand, do and manage. A brief history of waste reduction thinking[edit] 20th century[edit]

Cellular manufacturing Cellular Manufacturing is a model for workplace design, and has become an integral part of lean manufacturing systems. Cellular Manufacturing is based upon the principles of Group Technology, which seeks to take full advantage of the similarity between parts, through standardization and common processing. In Functional Manufacturing similar machines are placed close together (e.g. lathes, mills, drills etc.). Functional layouts are more robust to machine breakdowns, have common jigs and fixtures in the same area and supports high levels of demarcation. History[edit] Cellular Manufacturing is the application of the principles of Group Technology in manufacturing. Design[edit] The goal of cellular manufacturing is having the flexibility to produce a high variety of low demand products, while maintaining the high productivity of large scale production. An additional goal in cellular manufacturing is the maximization of process ownership with moderation of capital investment. See also[edit]

Just-in-Time Just-in-Time "Just-in-Time" means making "only what is needed, when it is needed, and in the amount needed." For example, to efficiently produce a large number of automobiles, which can consist of around 30,000 parts, it is necessary to create a detailed production plan that includes parts procurement. Supplying "what is needed, when it is needed, and in the amount needed" according to this production plan can eliminate waste, inconsistencies, and unreasonable requirements, resulting in improved productivity. Kanban System In the TPS (Toyota Production System), a unique production control method called the "kanban system" plays an integral role. Evolution of the kanban through daily improvements Through continuous technological improvements, the kanban system has evolved into the "e-kanban," which is managed using IT methodologies and has increased productivity even further. - Why use a supermarket concept?

What is just-in-time manufacturing (JIT manufacturing Just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing is a production model in which items are created to meet demand, not created in surplus or in advance of need. The purpose of JIT production is to avoid the waste associated with overproduction, waiting and excess inventory, three of the seven waste categories defined in the Toyota Production System (known in North America as the lean production model). The JIT concept was described by Henry Ford in his 1923 book, My Life and Work: We have found in buying materials that it is not worthwhile to buy for other than immediate needs. We buy only enough to fit into the plan of production, taking into consideration the state of transportation at the time. If transportation were perfect and an even flow of materials could be assured, it would not be necessary to carry any stock whatsoever. Toyota adopted JIT in the Toyota Production System (TPS), as a means of eliminating the seven wastes.

Production leveling On a production line, as in any process,[2] fluctuations in performance increase waste. This is because equipment, workers, inventory and all other elements required for production must always be prepared for peak production. This is a cost of flexibility. If a later process varies its withdrawal of parts in terms of timing and quality, the range of these fluctuations will increase as they move up the line towards the earlier processes. This is known as demand amplification. Where demand is constant, production leveling is easy, but where customer demand fluctuates, two approaches have been adopted: 1) demand leveling and 2) production leveling through flexible production. To prevent fluctuations in production, even in outside affiliates, it is important to minimize fluctuation in the final assembly line. Production Leveling by volume or by product type or mix[edit] Leveling by volume[edit] Leveling by product[edit] Implementation[edit] Demand leveling[edit] Implementation[edit] See also[edit]

Just-In-Time Systems Comments Favorited Successfully! Favorite Failed! Already Added! Login To Add! Cannot favorite your own presentation! Please Login to flag this presentation! Your inappropriate request is sent successfully! Failed to send your inappropiate request! Please login to send a feature request! Your feature quest has been sent successfuly! Error while send your feature request! Description: Chapter 16. Chapter 16 An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use only and may not be sold or licensed nor shared on other sites. While downloading, If for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server. Slide 1 Slide 2 JIT/Lean Production Slide 3 JIT Goals Eliminate disruptions Make system flexible by reduce setup and lead times Eliminate waste, especially excess inventory Slide 4 Sources of Waste Slide 5 Big vs. Slide 6 JIT Building Blocks

Just-In-Time Manufacturing (JIT) Introduction Just-in-time manufacturing was a concept introduced to the United States by the Ford motor company. It works on a demand-pull basis, contrary to hitherto used techniques, which worked on a production-push basis. To elaborate further, under just-in-time manufacturing (colloquially referred to as JIT production systems), actual orders dictate what should be manufactured, so that the exact quantity is produced at the exact time that is required. Just-in-time manufacturing goes hand in hand with concepts such as Kanban, continuous improvement and total quality management (TQM). Just-in-time production requires intricate planning in terms of procurement policies and the manufacturing process if its implementation is to be a success. Highly advanced technological support systems provide the necessary back-up that Just-in-time manufacturing demands with production scheduling software and electronic data interchange being the most sought after. Advantages Just-In-Time Systems Conclusion

8 Dimensions of Quality | Lean Six Sigma Academy By Chris Akins of Trident-Consulting LLC The definition of quality is often a hotly debated topic. While it may seem intuitive, when we get right down to it, “quality” is a difficult concept to define with any precision. The most fundamental definition of a quality product is one that meets the expectations of the customer. In order to develop a more complete definition of quality, we must consider some of the key dimensions of a quality product or service. Dimension 1: Performance Does the product or service do what it is supposed to do, within its defined tolerances? Performance is often a source of contention between customers and suppliers, particularly when deliverables are not adequately defined within specifications. The performance of a product often influences profitability or reputation of the end-user. Dimension 2: Features Does the product or services possess all of the features specified, or required for its intended purpose? Dimension 3: Reliability Dimension 4: Conformance Summary

Harley-Davidson's Just-in-Time (JIT) Journey | Operations Case Studies | Business Operations Management Cases | Case Study Abstract: process control, and JIT. The company soon realized that in order to beat Japanese competition, it had to implement these practices as well. The company successfully implemented JIT practices and reaped several benefits. After spectacular growth in the 1990s and the early 2000s, Harley-Davidson again faced hard times from 2007. The case also looks at the challenges faced by the company in the latter part of the first decade of the new millennium, and how it was trying to focus on ‘continuous improvement' in a bid to bring itself back into profits. Issues: Contents: Keywords: Operations Management, Just in Time (JIT), Supplier Network, Operational Strategies, Statistical Process Control, Employee Involvement, Statistical Operator Control, Inventory Management, Material As Needed (MAN), Continuous Improvement, Supply Chain, Low Cost manufacturing, Harley Davidson, Quality, Japanese Manufacturing Introduction- Next Page>> Custom Search

Total quality management Total quality management (TQM) consists of organization-wide efforts to install and make permanent a climate in which an organization continuously improves its ability to deliver high-quality products and services to customers. While there is no widely agreed-upon approach, TQM efforts typically draw heavily on the previously-developed tools and techniques of quality control. TQM enjoyed widespread attention during the late 1980s and early 1990s before being overshadowed by ISO 9000, Lean manufacturing, and Six Sigma. History[edit] In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the developed countries of North America and Western Europe suffered economically in the face of stiff competition from Japan's ability to produce high-quality goods at competitive cost. Development in the United States[edit] From the Navy, TQM spread throughout the US Federal Government, resulting in the following: Features[edit] The key concepts in the TQM effort undertaken by the Navy in the 1980s include:[11] Joseph M. [edit]

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