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Complementary Currency Resource Center

Complementary Currency Resource Center
Related:  Alternative Exchange SystemsNew Organisations and Business Models

Greece develops cashless, Euro-free currency in tight economy By The GuardianFriday, March 16, 2012 10:09 EDT Jon Henley, The Guardian A determination to ‘move beyond anger to creativity’ is driving a strong barter economy in some places In recent weeks, Theodoros Mavridis has bought fresh eggs, tsipourou (the local brandy: beware), fruit, olives, olive oil, jam, and soap. He has also had some legal advice, and enjoyed the services of an accountant to help fill in his tax return. None of it has cost him a euro, because he had previously done a spot of electrical work – repairing a TV, sorting out a dodgy light – for some of the 800-odd members of a fast-growing exchange network in the port town of Volos, midway between Athens and Thessaloniki. In return for his expert labour, Mavridis received a number of Local Alternative Units (known as tems in Greek) in his online network account. He had just treated Maria McCarthy, an English teacher who has lived and worked in the town for 20 years. “They’re quite joyous occasions,” she said.

Local currencies cash in on recession -- latimes.com PITTSBORO, N.C. — The stimulus for this mill town turned artist's colony arrived in the form of green bills bearing sketches of herons, turtles and trees. A few dozen local businesses banded together this spring to distribute the Plenty -- a local currency intended to replace the dollar. Now 15,000 Plenties are in circulation here, used everywhere from the organic food co-op to the feed store to, starting this month, the Piggly Wiggly supermarket. Last popularized during the Great Depression, scrip, or locally created stand-ins for U.S. currency, is making a comeback. "The Plenty is not going to get siphoned off to Wall Street, or Washington, or make a stop in Bentonville on its way to China," said B.J. Over the last two decades, a few communities have created their own cash in an effort to preserve local ties or businesses. The idea caught on fast, and other taverns agreed to help back the currency. "It's like a wink or a secret handshake," Belanger said. Thus Mesa Bucks were born.

Defining the Next Generation Enterprise for 2014 Many of you know that over the last several years I’ve tried to make the case that most organizations are currently falling behind the advancing pace of technological change. That business is so centered around technology today is the reason why addressing this has become a top competitive issue. Becoming better adapted to tech change is even tied to the medium-term survival of many organization as I recently explored in my look at digital transformation. But to say that technology alone is what is disrupting traditional businesses would be inaccurate. We ourselves have changed — have co-evolved — along with technology. Our mindsets have become expanded by the new possibilities of super-connectedness, new models of working, and pervasive data-based insight that today’s networked revolution has wrought. That’s not to say there aren’t important pros and cons to these advances as well. Related: Digital Business Ecologies: How Social Networks and Communities Are Upending Our Organizations

MI Alliance of TimeBanks - How It Works At its most basic level, TimeBanking is simply about spending an hour doing something for somebody in your community. That hour goes into the TimeBank as a Time Dollar. Then you have a Time dollar to spend on having someone doing something for you. It’s a simple idea, but it has powerful ripple effects in building community connections. Each TimeBank has a website where you list what you would like to do for other members. With TimeBanking, you will be working with a small group of committed individuals who are joined together for a common good. Communities print their own currency to keep cash flowing By Marisol Bello, USA TODAY A small but growing number of cash-strapped communities are printing their own money. Borrowing from a Depression-era idea, they are aiming to help consumers make ends meet and support struggling local businesses. The systems generally work like this: Businesses and individuals form a network to print currency. Shoppers buy it at a discount — say, 95 cents for $1 value — and spend the full value at stores that accept the currency. Workers with dwindling wages are paying for groceries, yoga classes and fuel with Detroit Cheers, Ithaca Hours in New York, Plenty in North Carolina or BerkShares in Massachusetts. Ed Collom, a University of Southern Maine sociologist who has studied local currencies, says they encourage people to buy locally. "We wanted to make new options available," says Jackie Smith of South Bend, Ind., who is working to launch a local currency. "We print the real thing," she says. The IRS gets its share.

EOI Faculty One — Red Monkey Company Q: Voor welke organisaties is Faculty One interessant? Organisaties waarvan de CEO en het topmanagement voelen dat ze iets moeten ondernemen om ook in de toekomst innovatief te zijn en te blijven groeien. Bedrijven die nu meer dan vroeger, moeilijkheden ondervinden om hun producten en/of diensten aan hun doelgroep te verkopen. Q: Wat zijn de eigenschappen van het initiatief Faculty One? Het is een netwerk van bedrijven en organisaties die niet in competitie met elkaar staan en die samen de EOI Mindset van Jef Staes leren, om ze daarna toe te passen in hun eigen bedrijfDe CEO's en HR-manager van de organisaties willen een nieuwe weg inslaan met hun organisatieFaculty One is een betaalbaar initiatief zodat een groot aantal bedrijven kan deelnemen en de switch van 2D naar 3D kan makenFaculty One is een schaalbaar initiatief waarbij je eigen medewerkers opgeleid kunnen worden om ook in je eigen bedrijf trajecten te begeleiden. Q: Waarom heet dit Engine of Innovation Faculty? A: Nee.

Towns Create Local Currencies With local economies flailing, communities across the U.S. are trying to drum up more action on Main Street. "Buy Local" campaigns are one way to go. But many towns--from Ojai, Calif., to Greensboro, N.C.--are considering going a step further and printing money that can only be spent locally. Issuing an alternative currency is perfectly legal, as long as it is treated as taxable income and consists of paper bills rather than coins. In the U.S., where local currencies were popular during the Depression, the biggest alterna-cash system is in Massachusetts' Berkshire County. Subscribe Now Get TIME the way you want it One Week Digital Pass — $4.99 Monthly Pay-As-You-Go DIGITAL ACCESS — $2.99 One Year ALL ACCESS — Just $30!

Local Currencies Grow During Economic Recession The gentle mountain slopes of New England isolate the Berkshires, creating a peaceful remoteness in this southern Massachusetts region. As a result, independent thinkers have thrived here. Herman Melville penned Moby Dick; Norman Rockwell etched paintings of American life; W. Today, the Berkshires is giving rise to a new wave of free thinking. Since the currency's launch two years ago, five local banks have printed more than 2 million paper notes. The Berkshires is not alone. Witt is now fielding calls from around the world, she said, especially from the United States and United Kingdom. "In the last four years, there has been a renewed interest in local economy, local production," said Witt, executive director of the E. Complementary forms of currency are nothing new, and they frequently appear when mainstream financial systems are in distress. The currencies take on various forms. In Switzerland, the WIR (the German word for "we") functions as a mutual credit system. von Raivo Pommer

Videos Most Videos are in FLV format which can be viewed only if appropriate Flash Player is installed on your computer. Get Flash Here if your browser does not display any video on this page. A high speed broadband connection is recommended for smooth viewing of the videos. Another option would be to right click and save a copy of any video on your computer. NOTE: All the videos available on this site are copyrighted materials of the Centre for Bhutan Studies unless specifically mentioned in some of the videos. The Centre reserves all rights to these videos and use of any videos for purpose other than personal viewing should obtain a written permission from the Centre. Centre for Bhutan Studies presents a film on GNH – Part 1 Download the above video [right-click - save-file-as] Centre for Bhutan Studies presents a film on GNH – Part 2 Download the above video [right-click - save-file-as] Centre for Bhutan Studies presens a film on GNH – Part 3 Download the above video [right-click - save-file-as]

Local currency - Cashwiki - the Collaborative Website about Money In economics, a local currency, in its common usage, is a currency not backed by a national government (and not necessarily legal tender), and intended to trade only in a small area. These currencies are also referred to as community currency. They encompass a wide range of forms, both physically and financially, and often are associated with a particular economic discourse. History Free banking provides the economic prototype of local currencies. A few such currencies, however, developed into monetary systems in their own right. Complementary currency is a hypernym to local currency, but the terms are often used as synonyms. Advocates, such as Jane Jacobs, argue that this enables an economically cool, yet depressed region to pull itself up, by giving the people living there a medium of exchange that they can use to exchange services and locally-produced goods. Local currencies can also come into being when there is economic turmoil involving the national currency. Characteristics Theory

Local Currencies Grow During Economic Recession Photo courtesy Jason Houston Five local banks have printed more than 2 million Berkshare notes since 2006. The 10 Berkshare note features Robyn Van En, a local pioneer of community supported agriculture.The gentle mountain slopes of New England isolate the Berkshires, creating a peaceful remoteness in this southern Massachusetts region. As a result, independent thinkers have thrived here. Herman Melville penned Moby Dick; Norman Rockwell etched paintings of American life; W. E. Today, the Berkshires is giving rise to a new wave of free thinking. Since the currency's launch two years ago, five local banks have printed more than 2 million paper notes. The Berkshires is not alone. Witt is now fielding calls from around the world, she said, especially from the United States and United Kingdom. "In the last four years, there has been a renewed interest in local economy, local production," said Witt, executive director of the E. The currencies take on various forms.

I do Holacracy 1. Story of an experiment that turns out to be something good. Hi, My name is Greg. I met my collagues in 2013 late spring. I joined their company as a project manager and an organisation developer. I am comited to work on the field that I call cooperation development. Some info and parameters:- this is holacracy, I will not explain it here. What is your Holacracy story?

The local currency rush: 'In the U.S. we don't trust' - Jan. 18 NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- It may seem like Monopoly money to outsiders, but a growing number of communities across the U.S. are using homegrown local currencies to stimulate their economies and protect themselves from the nation's broader economic woes. While there were only about 20 active community currencies in the United States in 2009, there has been a recent resurgence, with at least a dozen communities developing their own currencies in the past couple of years, estimates Loren Gatch, a professor of political science at the University of Central Oklahoma who researches these alternative currencies. In addition, currencies that have been around for years have seen a spike in interest, with membership doubling in some cases. "Economic instability is on peoples' minds," said Gatch. Now, even state governments are exploring the option. Funny money? Local boost: Many alternative currencies were created in an effort to keep wealth within communities and to support local businesses.

Introducing Mendo Time Bank « Ukiah Blog Live [Local community advocate Julia (Dakin) Frech is heading up a local effort to organize a Time Bank. Mendo Time Bank website is here. The link to join Mendo Time Bank is here. How Time Banks work is here. Excerpted from No More Throw-Away People by Edgar Cahn “Time Dollars” in a “Time Bank” are a local currency, issued locally, and honored locally. There is no doubt that money rewards self-interest, greed, ruthlessness and material acquisition. Time Dollars simply count the hours people put in. Counting counts. A user-friendly information and accounting system serves two functions. Most of us do not know what our neighbors can do. Merely the issuing of Time Dollar bank statements operates as a kind of reward. Time Dollars in a Nutshell 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

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