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Homemade Lamps from Everyday Objects

Homemade Lamps from Everyday Objects
Having the ability to create light without needing electricity should be part of everyone’s emergency essentials. While flashlights are certainly helpful, batteries quickly die out so having a store of candles on hand can provide the light and morale boost that one needs to make it through a dark night or two. But what if you didn’t have any candles available? Fortunately there are very simple ways to make homemade lamps from everyday objects found around the house. How a Lamp Works Both oil lamps and candles are able to continually burn their fuel (wax or oil) through a process called capillary action. Understanding this is the key to creating many different types of wicks for your homemade lamps. Making a Tuna Fish Can Oil Lamp Here’s a simple example of how to make your own oil lamp using a tuna fish can. Tuna CanVegetable Oil, Olive Oil or any other cooking oilOld Cotton T-Shirt, Rag, or SockNail (or something sharp to poke a hole through the top of the tuna can) Light the wick. Related:  Off Off The Gridbluewater007

How To: Vegetable Oil Lamp Posted on Oct 04, 2010 in DIY Projects, Emergency Preparedness & Survival Source: Judy of the Woods If you like candles, live without electricity, or like to have some lighting back-up, you might like this simple little DIY project. An oil lamp can have a number of advantages over candles and mineral oil lamps: very cheap to run – can even burn used cooking oilthe fumes are less toxic than those of paraffin candles or mineral oil lampsthe production of renewable vegetable oil is less harmful to the environment than petroleum based products (including paraffin candles)for the extreme survivalist, vegetable oil is easier to store in bulk, or can even be produced on the home farmdue to the wider base, more stable than candles, and the flame of any burning wick falling into the oil will be extinguishedodor free when using olive oil Making an oil lamp is very easy, quick and cheap, and gives plenty of opportunity for a creative outlet. You Will Need: Making the Wick Holder The Wick Container Oil

How To Heat Up Your Room Using Just a Candle: This heater is a multi-core steel and ceramic radiator assembly, suspended above the candle on a solid steel stand. The radiator absorbs and concentrates the thermal energy of the candle and converts it into dry radiant space heat. If you burn candles, now you can add their heat to your home or office. There is also an “electric candle” option that uses a 60 watt quartz halogen lamp; that works out to about 6 cents for 10 hours of “burn” time. “Steel has the ability to approach the temperature of its heat source,” says the inventor, “so the solid steel inner core will go as high as 550° Fahrenheit. That high inner temperature is mitigated to a very warm 160° to 180° on the outer surface. The simple elegant design has no moving parts. What’s new for 2008 is an “electric candle” option that takes advantage of the fact that 90% of the energy that goes into an incandescent lamp is “wasted” as heat. The electric candle is pictured below:

DIY Mason Jar Oil Lamp Lantern Craft Tutorial for Indoors or Outdoors DIY and create a beautiful oil lamp / lantern from a mason jar. Indoors, or outdoors, your new beautiful oil burning lamp craft will look gorgeous anywhere. A concept idea for using your lantern to burn scented oil has been appended onto the end of this tutorial. Oil lanterns are nice to have when camping, and they’re also great to have around for power outages. These mason jar oil lamps are functional, very inexpensive, fun to make, and sometimes just nice to kick back and stare at for a while. Keep out of reach of children and away from pets. There are endless variations that can be implemented when making your oil lamp— just use your imagination! Have you seen the article with 12 different oil lamps made using all sorts of jars, jugs and bottles? Do you remember the experiment in grade school with food coloring, applying it to different liquids that would ultimately float on the others? That was all, of course, due to different densities in the different liquids.

Olive Oil Lamps It's a good idea to be able to know how to create your own light sources in case you ever need them. This is a simple candle that you can put together with things that you already have laying around the kitchen (besides the wick, but I'd recommend keeping that as a regular stockpiled item anyways!) There were many times when we have lost power at our house. Olive Oil Candles What you need: Depending on how long you want your candle to burn you can pick different thicknesses of wick. I would go with at least a #2 wick if you choose the smaller, more candle like flame. Or if you are going for more light you may want to pick up a lantern width wick. Cut the wick a couple inches long. Bend the wire so it hooks onto the side of the jar. Here's a close up of the wick in the middle. Add your olive oil and that's it! The awesome thing about this candle/lantern is that olive oil burns clean and doesn't smoke. I personally used these squatty style half pint jars. What should we work on next?

Compass Alternatives Compass Instructions and Alternatives ( or How to Find Your Way With or Without a Compass ) Copyright © 1999,2004 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. All Rights Reserved. Click Here for a Microsoft WORD printer friendly copy of this article. A good compass has been a valuable asset to explorers, travelers, and hunters for many centuries. Let's begin be examining the primary function of a compass. On some compasses the letters are on a dial on the outside border of the compass. In the picture of the black compass below, the N, E, S, and W are printed on a floating dial inside the compass. Regardless of which type of compass you have, the relative position of N, E, S, and W in relation to one another is always the same. Many camping supply stores, including WalMart, sometimes carry a small compass that is part of a multi-function unit that usually includes a miniature thermometer and a whistle (and sometimes a folding magnifying glass). The Sun The sun rises in the east and sets in the west.

DIY Cheap 100 Hour Candles I am always on the look-out for homemade counterparts to store bought preparations. These DIY ’100 hour candles’ definitely fit the bill. In less than 5 minutes you have an inexpensive, refillable ’100 hour candle’ that will light up your home in the darkest of times. And for you ladies – these homemade alternatives are far more aesthetically pleasing than the store bought versions. Supplies The supplies you need are pretty straight forward. Just as a side note, it took me forever to find the liquid paraffin. Step One: Create Opening For Wick I used some grass-trimming shears but you can use a knife or any other sharp tool to create your opening. Step Two: Insert Wick Instead of just putting the wick in like a candle, we’re going to place it so that it is doubled over. After having both ends through, pull down so that only a tiny amount of the folded piece of wick remains. Step Three: Pour Paraffin Into Jar Fill up your 1/2 pint mason jar with the liquid paraffin. Step Four: Secure the Top

Thanksgiving & Christmas Themed Oil Lanterns in Jam Jars Mason jar oil lamps are fun, efficient, easy to DIY, and functional! Here’s a complete how-to on making these lamp oil burning, downright awesome lanterns! With Thanksgiving and Christmas approaching quickly, we wanted to create yet another variation to the classic mason jar oil lamp, but this time we added a splash of color that would be fitting for the upcoming Holiday gatherings! DIY oil lanterns in jars are usually always made with fiberglass wicks, rather than cotton, because the fiberglass wicks do not burn down and waste away like other traditional organic wick material. These lanterns can be used inside providing the lamp oil used is marked for indoor or outdoor use, or if you are using an alternative fuel such as vegetable oil or olive oil. Another difference is that the wicks used in these oil burners are 1/8″ in diameter, and the wick itself is contained inside a glass wick insert (holder). Instructions Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas!

Hobo Stove Urban survival is a tricky subject to discuss. There are advantages to urban survival. Anywhere you look there are items in trash cans and dumpsters that can be used to improve a survival situation. Cardboard boxes can be used for shelter, newspapers can be used for insulation and to the practical survivor another persons trash can be a treasure. In this case we will use a coffee can to build a stove. Whether you call it a hobo stove, can stove, or just a survival stove, this is a cheap effective way to both cook and stay warm. Keep an open mind during any survival situation. Whether backpacking, camping, or surviving, having a way to cook can make a huge difference. A coffee can or large vegetable/ravioli can will allow you to build a stove and cook. Items used to build this stove: * Coffee can * Can opener * Tin snips * Drill and drill bits * Metal coat hanger There are many methods that could be used to build this stove. The top side of a coffee can is already opened. Materials:

12 More DIY Oil Lantern Ideas - Put It In A Jar We’ve previously covered how to create a mason jar oil lantern, and we’ve covered how to create a rock candle. Now, for inspiration, let’s check out 12 different photos of various bottles, jars, and jugs that were converted into oil lamps or lanterns using the same steps as mentioned in our two tutorials. One of the nice things about making your own oil lamps is that they serve a purpose and will be there when you actually need to have one around. They can be used indoors or outdoors, depending on the oil you’ll be using, and are perfect for a desk party, BBQ, or small get-together. Would you like to view one of our tutorials on how to make your own oil lamp? You guys / gals should email in your photos once you’ve made your own oil lanterns, or any of the other craft projects on our site! This design is pretty impressive. This Christmas oil lamp is absolutely brilliant. These oil lamps are very stylish! I love the Pale Ale lantern! You can definitely use olive oil for your lamp fuel.

DIY Burning Rock Oil Candle with Mason Jar Reservoir This DIY craft is closely related to our Mason Jar Oil Lamp, and though it is not solely a jar project, it helps to demonstrate the concept of the homemade oil lanterns a little more, and hopefully will spark ideas and creativity for the entire oil lantern category. Instead of using a jar, you’ll be using a slate, or thin rock as your candle, and you’ll do it by applying the same steps as mentioned in the mason jar version. However, we can tie this back into the jar theme a little bit by using a shallow mason jar for the lamp oil reservoir on the bottom of the rock. We’re going to use this one alongside our Halloween decorations this year. You can actually use any type of rock you’d like, but there are a few things to consider before jumping into things with that mindset– the thinner the rock, the easier it is to drill the holes for the wicks. Surrounding the rock candle, we’ll fill up the bowl with our collection of quartz crystals, and let the light from the flames reflect off of them.

Building a DIY microscope This is a story of what happens when a foolish scientist screws stuff up. It’s the story of a DIY microscope, and how it all went terribly wrong. I tried. I really did. I read the instructions through five times. Last week I came across the instructions to make a do-it-yourself microscope. I went out and got all the parts I would need. Here’s the idea for the microscope, invented by Kenji Yoshino, a Science Learning Center post-baccalaureate fellow at Grinnell College. Figure 2. But mine came out looking very different indeed. We started by trying to drill the wood and the Plexiglas to fit the screws in and make a base and a stage for the microscope. Bad choice. But even if you use masking tape or heat, you have to start with a very small drill bit, and then use larger and larger bits until you get a hole that is the right size. Despite the cracks, in the end we got the holes! And here’s where I made a BIG mistake. So I put the lens in the smaller piece. Finally, we put in the light.

Free Candle Making Instructions Directory Vital Instructions Candle Making Safety Instructions Do not make candles without reading and understanding these rules. Introduction To Candle Making This interactive on-line course teaches the basics of paraffin candle making. The course is 100% free, however you must register to use it. Candle Makers Troubleshooting Guide Just answer the questions for diagnosis and solutions to most candle making problems. Candle Measures A guide to measurements for candle making formulas. Wick Selection Guide Instructions on how to choose the correct wick for your Candles Candle Making Recipe Book Series This series is still under production, however most of the articles are now available. Container Candle Recipes A guide to container candle wax formulations and other information about container candles. Floating Candle Recipes A guide to floating candle wax formulations and other information about floating candles. Full Instruction List (in alphabetical order) Whipped Wax The basics of making whipped wax.

How to make a tool set Life without tools is barbaric. But even simple tools can be expensive in rural parts of developing countries. Import duties bump the costs up higher than they are in the States or elsewhere, and sometimes only low-quality brands are available anyway. So, to hold off future barbarians, we'd like to show how to build a simple tool set on a very low budget. Larry Bentley, the man who figured out how to make these tools, said a wise thing: "Without tools, kids don't take stuff apart, and without taking stuff apart, you don't learn how things work." These tools, Bentley says, could be in the hands of the next William Kamkambwa,who made a working wind power generator from backyard scraps in a village in Malawi. Here's Larry's quick guide to DIY tools. The tools in this guide: Saw Pliers Wooden vice Wood drill bit / star drill bit Chisel Strap hinge vice

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