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Peter Senge - Navigating Webs of Interdependence

Peter Senge - Navigating Webs of Interdependence

Home « CREAX Tony Schwartz: The Myths of the Overworked Creative Time is finite, but we act as if it were otherwise, assuming that longer hours always lead to increased productivity. But in reality our bodies are designed to pulse and pause – to expend energy and then renew it. In this revelatory talk, energy expert Tony Schwartz debunks common productivity myths and shows us how to regain control over our energy so we can produce great work. Tony Schwartz is founder and CEO of The Energy Project, a company that helps individuals and organizations fuel energy, engagement, focus, and productivity by drawing on the science of high performance. Tony has written four bestselling books, including The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working, published in 2010, and The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy Not Time, co-authored with Jim Loehr.Tony has also published widely about leadership, engagement, and culture change. www.theenergyproject.com@tonyschwartz

Spiral Dynamics In spiral dynamics, the term vmeme refers to a core value system, acting as an organizing principle, which expresses itself through memes (self-propagating ideas, habits, or cultural practices). The superscript letter v indicates these are not basic memes but value systems which include them. The colors act as reminders for the life conditions and mind capacities of each system and alternate between cool and warm colors as a part of the model.[2] Within the model, individuals and cultures do not fall clearly in any single category (color). Each person/culture embodies a mixture of the value patterns, with varying degrees of intensity in each. Spiral Dynamics claims not to be a linear or hierarchical model. According to Spiral Dynamics, there are infinite stages of progress and regression over time, dependent upon the life circumstances of the person or culture, which are constantly in flux. vMEMEs[edit] THE FIRST TIER VALUE SYSTEMS; The Levels of Subsistence[5] Beige[edit] Purple[edit]

Tony Fadell: On Setting Constraints, Ignoring Experts & Embracing Self-Doubt From the iPod and the iPhone to the Nest Learning Thermostat, Tony Fadell’s incredible creations have disrupted industries, introduced beautifully designed solutions, and changed the way we live. Which is why we selected him as the inaugural winner of the ALVA Award, a new prize presented by Behance in partnership with GE to recognize remarkable serial inventors. As Behance CEO Scott Belsky interviews him with questions sourced from the creative community, Tony shares insights on everything from his own creative process, to best practices for prototyping, to how to keep your team motivated and passionate for the long haul. Tony Fadell is the founder and CEO of Nest Labs, Inc., the company that developed the Nest Learning Thermostat. Prior to Nest, Tony served as senior vice president of Apple’s iPod division, reporting to Steve Jobs. Before joining Apple, Tony was a co-founder, CTO and director of engineering of the Mobile Computing group at Philips Electronics. www.nest.com

chris argyris, double-loop learning and organizational learning @ the encyclopedia of informal education contents: introduction · life · theories of action: theory in use and espoused theory · single-loop and double-loop learning · model I and model II · organizational learning · conclusion · further reading and references · links · cite Chris Argyris has made a significant contribution to the development of our appreciation of organizational learning, and, almost in passing, deepened our understanding of experiential learning. On this page we examine the significance of the models he developed with Donald Schön of single-loop and double-loop learning, and how these translate into contrasting models of organizational learning systems. Life Chris Argyris was born in Newark, New Jersey on July 16, 1923 and grew up in Irvington, New Jersey. During the Second World War he joined the Signal Corps in the U.S. Chris Argyris enjoyed the outdoors – and, in particular hiking (especially in the mountains of New Hampshire and across New England). Theories of action: theory in use and espoused theory

Keith Yamashita: The 3 Habits of Great Creative Teams When the your team is faced with adversity does it stand strong and act boldly or does it crumble under pressure? Based on his work with over 1000 teams, Keith Yamashita shares his insights about great collaborative environments including: have an awareness beyond your day-to-day, respect the unique talents of your team members, and actively cultivate meaningful one-on-one relationships. For the past two decades, Keith Yamashita has worked alongside CEOs and their leadership teams to define — and then attain — greatness for their institutions. He has worked with leaders at Apple, IBM, General Electric, Johnson & Johnson, eBay, Nike, and Gap, among others.Keith founded SYPartners — a firm steeped in the belief that transformation of individuals, teams, and institutions requires equal parts empathy, aspiration, and a bravery to act. SYPartnersUnstuckFast Company profile@keithyamashita

Video of Dr. Russell Ackoff Discussing Systems and Pieces On weekends, I like to share videos or fun stuff that gets us thinking. Today, I’m sharing a video with the legendary Dr. Russell Ackoff where he’s speaking at a session moderated by Clare Crawford-Mason, the producer of the outstanding video Good News…How Hospitals Heal Themselves on Lean and systems thinking. Ackoff makes important points in the video, but he starts with one of the funnier (and unexpected) speaker openings I’ve seen: Since Ackoff was speaking at the end of a list of distinguished speakers, he said: “I feel like a pornographic movie that’s being shown to people who just engaged in sex… in short, anti-climax.” Here is the video: Some of the notes I took while watching (I’ll leave them unedited): Failures in improvement programs – comes from not making systemic improvements. If a system is taken apart, it loses its inherent properties. If you take the parts separately, the system as a whole will not be improved. Continuous improvement or dis-continuous improvement?

Tina Seelig: The 6 Characteristics of Truly Creative People About this presentation Determined not to just write just another book on creativity, Stanford professor Tina Seelig painstakingly researched what makes good ideas spring forward. The result is her “innovation engine,” a special mix of six characteristics like attitude, resources and environment. But the special concoction of forces that makes our ideas come to life is nothing with out the willingness to fail. “Most call it failure, but we scientists just call it data,” she says. The most creative organizations and people embrace experimentation to get the needed data to determine they’re on to something. “Workers are puzzle builders, they get stuck when missing a piece,” she says. About Tina Seelig Tina Seelig is the executive director for the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the director of the National Center for Engineering Pathways to Innovation (Epicenter) at Stanford University’s School of Engineering. Links

Joseph M. Juran Early life[edit] Juran was born in Brăila, Romania, one of the six children born to a Jewish couple, Jakob and Gitel Juran; they later lived in Gura Humorului. He had three sisters: Rebecca (nicknamed Betty), Minerva, who earned a doctoral degree and had a career in education, and Charlotte. He had two brothers: Nathan H. Juran and Rudolph, known as Rudy. Personal life[edit] In 1926, he married Sadie Shapiro. Joseph and Sadie raised four children (3 sons and 1 daughter.) Department Chief[edit] Juran was promoted to department chief in 1928, and the following year became a division chief. As a hedge against the uncertainties of the Great Depression, he enrolled in Loyola University Chicago School of Law in 1931. During the Second World War, through an arrangement with his employer, Juran served in the Lend-Lease Administration and Foreign Economic Administration. Japan[edit] Working independently of W. Contributions[edit] Pareto principle[edit] Management theory[edit] The Juran trilogy[edit]

Gary Vaynerchuk: Stop Storytelling Like It’s 2007 About this presentation In a world with Vine, Snapchat, and Twitter, how can creatives capture attention to make their voices heard? In this 99U talk, best-selling author and founder of VaynerMedia, Gary Vaynerchuk breaks down how our work can cut through our current “A.D.D. Culture” — one where we binge-watch entire television seasons in one sitting and prefer texting to phone calls. “We’ve gotten to a point where everything is on our time,” says Vaynerchuk, “So why is everyone storytelling like it’s 2007 in a 2014 world?” Please note: This talk contains adult language. About Gary Vaynerchuk Already considered a quintessential maven of modern-day marketing, Gary Vaynerchuk is the founder of VaynerMedia and is a New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-selling author as well as a self-trained wine and social media expert. Gary has appeared on countless programs from Jimmy Fallon, Late Night with Conan O’Brien and Ellen to MSNBC, CNBC, CNN and NPR. Links

Russell L. Ackoff Russell Lincoln Ackoff (/ˈækɒf/; 12 February 1919 – 29 October 2009) was an American organizational theorist, consultant, and Anheuser-Busch Professor Emeritus of Management Science at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. Ackoff was a pioneer in the field of operations research, systems thinking and management science. Biography[edit] Russell L. From 1947 to 1951 Ackoff was assistant professor in philosophy and mathematics at the Wayne State University. Nicholson and Myers (1998) report that, in the 1970s and 1980s, the Social Systems Sciences Program at the Wharton School was "noted for combining theory and practice, escaping disciplinary bounds, and driving students toward independent thought and action. From 1986 to 2009, Ackoff was professor emeritus of the Wharton School, and chairman of Interact, the Institute for Interactive Management. Ackoff was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science at the University of Lancaster, UK in 1967. Russell L. Work[edit] f-Laws[edit] Podcast:

Jonathan Perelman: Content Is King, But Distribution Is Queen About this presentation Getting your voice heard online often feels like trying to talk in a crowded room. So how do you rise above the noise? In this 99U talk, Jonathan Perelman breaks down the tactics and mindsets used by Buzzfeed to stand out on social media and elsewhere (complete with its trademark listicles). By adopting a social-first mindset and creating content that appeals to emotion, Buzzfeed has grown from a small blog to a cultural phenomenon read by tens of millions of people (including the President of the United States). His advice? About Jonathan Perelman Jonathan Perelman is the VP of Agency Strategy and Industry Development at BuzzFeed. Prior to BuzzFeed, Jonathan spent six years at Google, most recently as the Global Lead for Industry Relations. Jonathan is a Sr. Links Buzzfeed@JPerelman

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