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Aztec mythology

Aztec mythology
Mictlantecuhtli (left), god of death, the lord of the Underworld and Quetzalcoatl (right), god of wisdom, life, knowledge, morning star, patron of the winds and light, the lord of the West. Together they symbolize life and death. Aztec mythology is the body or collection of myths of Aztec civilization of Central Mexico.[1] The Aztecs were Nahuatl speaking groups living in central Mexico and much of their mythology is similar to that of other Mesoamerican cultures. The Mexica/Aztec were said to be guided by their god Huitzilopochtli, meaning "Left-handed Hummingbird" or "Hummingbird from the South." Creation myth[edit] Huitzilopochtli is raising up the skies of the South, one of the four directions of the world, surrounded by their respective trees, temples, patterns and divination symbols. Because the Aztec adopted and combined several traditions with their own earlier traditions, they had several creation myths. Pantheon[edit] Bibliography[edit] Grisel Gómez Cano (2011). Sources[edit] Related:  legend

Anglo-Saxon paganism Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology. History[edit] Mythology[edit] Cosmology[edit] Deities[edit]

Native American mythology Coyote and Opossum appear in the stories of a number of tribes. The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Algonquian (northeastern US, Great Lakes)[edit] Abenaki mythology – Religious ceremonies are led by shamans, called Medeoulin (Mdawinno).Anishinaabe traditional beliefs – A North American tribe located primarily in the Great LakesCree mythology – A North American tribe most commonly found west of Ontario in the Canadian Prairies, although there are tribes located in the Northwest Territories and Quebec.Leni Lenape mythology – A North American tribe from the area of the Delaware River. Plains Natives[edit] Blackfoot mythology – A North American tribe who currently live in Montana. Muskogean (southern US) and Iroquois (Eastern US)[edit] Alaska and Canada[edit] Pacific Northwest[edit] Colin F.

Aztec mythology The Aztecs were a people who, through military alliances with other groups, dominated central and southern Mexico from the 14th to the 16th century. After the death of Montezuma II in 1520, the divisions and internal strife among the 38 tributary provinces and the fiercely independent peoples at the fringes of the Aztec Empire, made it easy for the Spanish conquistadors, led by Hernán Cortés, to defeat it in 1521. The name Aztec is derived from a mythical homeland to the north called Aztlán; the Aztecs also called themselves the Mexica. Their language belongs to the Nahuatlan branch of the Uto-Aztecan family. » Browse through the list of available articles in this area. Greek mythology Greek mythology is explicitly embodied in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts. Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature. Archaeological findings provide a principal source of detail about Greek mythology, with gods and heroes featured prominently in the decoration of many artifacts. Sources Literary sources The poetry of the Hellenistic and Roman ages was primarily composed as a literary rather than cultic exercise. Finally, a number of Byzantine Greek writers provide important details of myth, much derived from earlier now lost Greek works. Archaeological sources Survey of mythic history Origins of the world and the gods

Moai Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The production and transportation of the 887 statues[3] are considered remarkable creative and physical feats.[4] The tallest moai erected, called Paro, was almost 10 metres (33 ft) high and weighed 82 tons;[5] the heaviest erected was a shorter but squatter moai at Ahu Tongariki, weighing 86 tons; and one unfinished sculpture, if completed, would have been approximately 21 metres (69 ft) tall with a weight of about 270 tons. Description[edit] Eyes[edit] Dr.

List of mythologies This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region. Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit] Central Africa[edit] East Africa[edit] Horn of Africa[edit] Somali mythology North Africa[edit] West Africa[edit] Southern Africa[edit] Arctic[edit] overlaps with North Asia, Northern Europe and North America. Asia[edit] Southwestern Asia[edit] Middle East, Persia, Anatolia, Caucasus. Ancient Medieval to Modern South Asia[edit] East Asia[edit] Southeast Asia[edit] Central and Northern Asia[edit] (overlaps with Eastern and Northern Europe) Australia and Oceania[edit] Europe[edit] Classical Antiquity[edit] Northern Europe[edit] Eastern Europe[edit] Southern Europe[edit] Western Europe[edit] North Caucasus[edit] Nart saga (Covers Abazin, Abkhaz, Circassian, Ossetian, Karachay-Balkar and Chechen-Ingush mythologies)Ossetian mythologyVainakh mythology (Covers Chechen and Ingush mythology) South Caucasus/Transcaucasia[edit] British Isles[edit] Americas[edit] North America[edit] Post-Columbian Folklore of the United States

Aztec Creation Story How did the world begin? The Aztec creation story has its own answer - or you could say, answers, to that question. The five suns were the key to the rebirths of the world. The story of creation in ancient Mexico and surrounding areas actually changed as time went by. It was likely adapted by the Aztecs for their own political purposes, though even within the Aztec empire there were variations of the story. But basic components of the story had evolved over centuries and centuries, so we do see similarities between the Aztec's stories and the beliefs of earlier cultures. Rebirth The story of creation, according to the Aztecs, is actually a story of birth, death, and rebirth. But it's not a story of endless cycles, as you may see in other cultures. In the beginning was the void. The directions were very important to the Aztecs, since their great empire was believed to be at the very centre of the universe (remember what I mentioned about the Aztec creation story being political?).

Elysium Elysium or the Elysian Fields (Ancient Greek: Ἠλύσιον πεδίον, Ēlýsion pedíon) is a conception of the afterlife that developed over time and was maintained by certain Greek religious and philosophical sects and cults. Initially separate from the realm of Hades, admission was reserved for mortals related to the gods and other heroes. Later, it expanded to include those chosen by the gods, the righteous, and the heroic, where they would remain after death, to live a blessed and happy life, and indulging in whatever employment they had enjoyed in life.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The ruler of Elysium varies from author to author: Pindar and Hesiod name Cronus as the ruler,[9] while the poet Homer in the Odyssey describes fair-haired Rhadamanthus dwelling there.[6][7][10][11] Classical literature[edit] In Homer’s Odyssey, Elysium is described as a paradise: to the Elysian plain…where life is easiest for men. Pindar's Odes describes the reward waiting for those living a righteous life: See also[edit]

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