background preloader

Twenty Tips for Managing Project-Based Learning

Twenty Tips for Managing Project-Based Learning
In honor of Edutopia's 20th anniversary, we're producing a series of Top 20 lists, from the practical to the sublime. 20 Tips for Managing Project-Based Learning 1. Use Social Media One of the best ways to document collaboration and engage students with technology is use social media platforms like Edmodo. Students can use it to share ideas, you as the teacher can use it to formatively assess where students are in terms of products and content knowledge, and it is a great way to have real evidence of collaboration. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Bonus! A quick note on these tips: There is no real silver bullet to get every single kid under the sun engaged in your classroom, but good teachers use all the strategies they can muster.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-tips-pbl-project-based-learning-educators-andrew-miller

Related:  PBL ICTslearning strategies and techniquesPBLApplicationsacademy education gateway

Project-Based Learning Background Edutopia The George Lucas Educational Foundation (GLEF) was founded in 1991 as a nonprofit operating foundation to celebrate and encourage innovation in schools. Free instructional modules created by professors of education and professional-development specialists may be used as extension units in existing courses, or can be used independently in workshops and meetings.

Student learning strategies, mental models and learning outcomes in problem-based and traditional curricula in medicine, Medical Teacher, Informa Healthcare Original Student learning strategies, mental models and learning outcomes in problem-based and traditional curricula in medicine 2006, Vol. 28, No. 8 , Pages 717-722 (doi:10.1080/01421590601105645) Kirsten Hofgaard Lycke1†, Per Grøttum1 and Helge I. What the Heck Is Project-Based Learning? You know the hardest thing about teaching with project-based learning? Explaining it to someone. It seems to me that whenever I asked someone the definition of PBL, the description was always so complicated that my eyes would begin to glaze over immediately. So to help you in your own musings, I've devised an elevator speech to help you clearly see what's it all about. PBL: The Elevator Speech

- 14 Amazing Project Sites: A STEM, PBL, Common Core Series - A Goldmine of Resources 0 Comments June 8, 2013 By: Michael Gorman Jun 8 Written by: 6/8/2013 3:20 PM Part 4: Planning an IT-Assisted PBL Lesson In this section we continue work on a PBL Lesson Planning Table that we started in Part 2. A Seven-Step Planning Process The first phase of developing an ICT-Assisted PBL lesson plan focuses on defining the topic of the lesson and developing the curriculum, instruction, and assessment. The following is adapted from Moursund, D.G. (2003) Project-Based Learning in an Information Technology Environment. Eugene, OR: ISTE. Project content.

Reflection and reflective practice in health professions education: a systematic review The importance of reflection and reflective practice are frequently noted in the literature; indeed, reflective capacity is regarded by many as an essential characteristic for professional competence. Educators assert that the emergence of reflective practice is part of a change that acknowledges the need for students to act and to think professionally as an integral part of learning throughout their courses of study, integrating theory and practice from the outset. Activities to promote reflection are now being incorporated into undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education, and across a variety of health professions. The evidence to support and inform these curricular interventions and innovations remains largely theoretical.

Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Teacher Infographics Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Using Google Tools in Project-Based Learning Infographic Project-based learning is a dynamic approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges and acquire a deeper knowledge. Project-based learning should be student-driven, with a real-world connection. 5 Tools to Help Students Learn How to Learn Helping students learn how to learn: That’s what most educators strive for, and that’s the goal of inquiry learning. That skill transfers to other academic subject areas and even to the workplace where employers have consistently said that they want creative, innovative and adaptive thinkers. Inquiry learning is an integrated approach that includes kinds of learning: content, literacy, information literacy, learning how to learn, and social or collaborative skills.

ICT Lesson Repository About us Courses & workshops Consultancy services Clients & publications Tools & webquests Coached Through College: Professional Motivators Decrease Dropout Rates When she became the first person in her family to graduate from college, Virginia Hughes invited the three people she credited most with getting her to that milestone: her mother, her grandmother and a retired hospital administrator named Laura Harrill. Even though she’d been a perfect stranger until Hughes’s senior year in high school, Harrill helped her navigate the shoals of paperwork, financial issues and personal dramas that prevent many students from ever getting into, let alone completing, college. “I consider her an extension of my family,” said Hughes, of Maryville, Tenn., who graduated from Pellissippi State Community College in Knoxville and is now pursuing a bachelor’s degree in anthropology at the University of Tennessee. “Even if I had a bad day and just needed somebody to talk to, I knew she’d be there.”

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t Screenshot/High Tech High The term “project-based learning” gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they’re learning. Teachers might add projects meant to illustrate what students have learned, but may not realize what they’re doing is actually called “project-oriented learning.” PYP Transdisciplinary Themes Who we are: an inquiry into The nature of the self Beliefs and values Personal, physical, mental, social, and spiritual health Human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures Rights and responsibilities What it means to be human Where we are in place and time: an inquiry into Orientation in place and time Personal histories Homes and journeys The discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind How we express ourselves: an inquiry into The ways which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture Beliefs and values The ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity Our appreciation of the aesthetic.

Related: