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Headspace - Australia’s National Youth Mental Health Foundation

Headspace - Australia’s National Youth Mental Health Foundation

Empowering Australians to manage their health | It's My Health Mental health The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) develops, maintains and reports on national mental health care data, including 4 mental health National Minimum Datasets, to provide a picture of mental health-related service provision in Australia. Working collaboratively with Australian and state and territory government departments, the AIHW aims to provide timely and relevant information on mental health services in Australia, their usage and the resources required to run them. As well as producing Mental health services in Australia and Mental health services–in brief, the AIHW is also provides data analytical support to the National Mental Health Commission and participates in various national mental health committees. Mental health services in Australia reports Mental health services in Australia (online version) provides the most recent information about the activity and characteristics of Australia’s mental health-related services. Mental health services - in brief 2013

NetWellness Homepage ‎mindslikeours.co.uk Free Your Mind Projects What Internet Habits Say About Mental Health Consider two questions. First: Who are you? What makes you different from your peers, in terms of the things you buy, the clothes you wear, and the car you drive (or refuse to)? What makes you unique in terms of your basic psychological make-up—the part of you that makes you do the things you do, say the things you say, and feel the things you feel? Although these questions may seem unrelated, they’re not. First, the research team asked over 200 volunteers to fill out a survey about “recent affective experiences;” what the volunteers didn’t know was that a well-known measure of depression—the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale—was embedded within this survey. Again, researchers didn’t know what people were looking at on the internet (for example, depression support groups—a dead giveaway), but merely how they were using the internet. It turns out that very specific patterns of internet use are reliably related to depressive tendencies.

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