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Organized crime

20th century American mobster Al Capone, a figure often associated with the topic of organized crime. Other organizations—including states, militaries, police forces, and corporations—may sometimes use organized crime methods to conduct their business, but their powers derive from their status as formal social institutions. There is a tendency to distinguish organized crime from other forms of crimes, such as, white-collar crime, financial crimes, political crimes, war crime, state crimes and treason. This distinction is not always apparent and the academic debate is ongoing.[3] For example, in failed states that can no longer perform basic functions such as education, security, or governance, usually due to fractious violence or extreme poverty, organised crime, governance and war are often complementary to each other. Models of organized crime[edit] Causal[edit] Organizational[edit] Patron-client networks[edit] Mafia boss Totò Riina behind bars in court after his arrest in 1993

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organized_crime

Related:  types of crime

Political crime States will define as political crimes any behaviour perceived as a threat, real or imagined, to the state's survival including both violent and non-violent oppositional crimes. A consequence of such criminalisation may be that a range of human rights, civil rights, and freedoms are curtailed, and conduct which would not normally be considered criminal per se (in other words, that is not antisocial according to those who engage in it) is criminalised at the convenience of the group holding power. Thus, while the majority of those who support the current regime may consider criminalisation of politically motivated behaviour an acceptable response when the offender is driven by more extreme political, ideological, religious or other beliefs, there may be a question of the morality of a law which simply criminalises ordinary political dissent.[2] Overview[edit]

Organized Crime English | Français What is transnational organized crime? | United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime | Overview of the work of UNODC in relation to organized criminal activities | Transnational Organized Crime Campaign Organized crime threatens peace and human security, violates human rights and undermines economic, social, cultural, political and civil development of societies around the world.

Terrorism The word "terrorism" is politically loaded and emotionally charged,[6] and this greatly compounds the difficulty of providing a precise definition. A study on political terrorism examining over 100 definitions of "terrorism" found 22 separate definitional elements (e.g. A broad array of political organizations has practiced terrorism to further their objectives. It has been practiced by both right-wing and left-wing political parties, nationalistic groups, religious groups, revolutionaries, and ruling governments.[14] The symbolism of terrorism can exploit human fear to help achieve these goals.[15] Origin of term[edit]

Corporate crime Corporate crime overlaps with: Definitional issues[edit] Legal person[edit] An 1886 decision of the United States Supreme Court, in Santa Clara County v. organized crime photo okami's photos - Buzznet Member Since: 2008-05-03 Relationship Status: owned by my felines Drink: No Smoke: Yes Education: Some College Occupation: retired About Me: former US Marine, retired police Favorite Music: Mexican Drug War The Mexican Drug War is an ongoing armed conflict among rival drug cartels fighting one another for regional control and against the Mexican government forces and civilian vigilante groups. Since 2006, when intervention with the Mexican military began, the government's principal goal has been to put down the drug-related violence.[47] Additionally, the Mexican government has claimed that their primary focus is on dismantling the powerful drug cartels, rather than on preventing drug trafficking, which is left to U.S. functionaries.[48][49][50] Although Mexican drug cartels, or drug trafficking organizations, have existed for several decades, they have become more powerful since the demise of the Colombian Cali and Medellín cartels in the 1990s. Analysts estimate that wholesale earnings from illicit drug sales[clarification needed] range from $13.6 billion[51] to $49.4 billion annually.[51][56][57] Background[edit]

Sicilian Mafia According to the classic definition, the Mafia is a criminal organization originating in Sicily.[1] However, the term "mafia" has become a generic term for any organized criminal network with similar structure, methods, and interests. The Mafia proper frequently parallels, collaborates with or clashes with, networks originating in other parts of southern Italy, such as the Camorra (from Campania), the 'Ndrangheta (from Calabria), the Stidda (southern Sicily) and the Sacra Corona Unita (from Apulia). Giovanni Falcone, the anti-Mafia judge murdered by the Mafia in 1992, however, objected to the conflation of the term "Mafia" with organized crime in general:

Public-order crime For example, in cases where a criminal act subverts or undermines the commercial effectiveness of normative business practices, the negative consequences extend beyond those at whom the specific immediate harm was intended. Similarly, in environmental law, there are offences that do not have a direct, immediate and tangible victim, so crimes go largely unreported and unprosecuted because of the problem of lack of victim awareness. In short, there are no clear, unequivocal definitions of "consensus", "harm", "injury", "offender", and "victim". Such judgments are always informed by contestable, epistemological, moral, and political assumptions (de Haan, 1990: 154).

Gambino crime family The rise of what for a time was the most powerful crime family in America began in 1957, the day Albert Anastasia was assassinated while sitting in a barber chair at the Park-Sheraton Hotel in Manhattan. Experts believe Carlo Gambino helped orchestrate the hit to take over the family. Gambino partnered with Meyer Lansky to control gambling interests in Cuba. The family's fortunes grew through 1976, when Gambino appointed his brother-in-law, Paul Castellano, as boss. Castellano infuriated upstart capo John Gotti, who orchestrated Castellano's murder in 1985. Gotti's downfall came in 1992, when his underboss Salvatore "Sammy the Bull" Gravano decided to cooperate with the FBI.

Gang A gang is a group of recurrently associating individuals or close friends with identifiable leadership and internal organization, identifying with or claiming control over territory in a community, and engaging either individually or collectively in violent or other forms of illegal behavior.[2] Some criminal gang members are "jumped in" or have to prove their loyalty by committing acts such as theft or violence. Although gangs exist internationally, there is a greater level of study and knowledgeable information of gangs specifically in the United States. A member of a gang is called a gangster. Definition[edit] Vito Cascioferro Vito Cascioferro or Vito Cascio Ferro (January 22, 1862 – c. 1942, summer 1943 or 1945), also known as Don Vito, was a prominent member of the Sicilian Mafia. He also operated for several years in the United States. He is often depicted as the "boss of bosses", although such a position does not exist in the loose structure of Cosa Nostra in Sicily. Cascioferro's life is full of myth and mystery.

Blue-collar crime In criminology, blue-collar crime is any crime committed by an individual from a lower social class as opposed to white-collar crime which is associated with crime committed by someone of a higher-level social class. Crime and unemployment[edit] The International Conference of Labour Statisticians (ILO) defines the unemployed as persons above a specified age who, during the reference period, were without work, were currently available for work, and were seeking work. The process of industrialisation encouraged working-class incorporation into society with greater social mobility being achieved during the twentieth century. But the routine of policing tends to focus on the public places where the economically marginal live out more of their lives, so regulation falls on those who are not integrated into the mainstream institutions of economic and political life.

Feds Bust Mob Gambling Ring Operating in New Haven, Stamford Areas June 13, 2012|By EDMUND H. MAHONY, emahony@courant.com, The Hartford Courant Law enforcement authorities said they broke up a multimillion-dollar, mob-connected gambling ring based in Connecticut Wednesday when they charged 20 men in Connecticut, New York and Florida with gambling and extortion. The gambling ring, based in Hamden and Stamford, was affiliated with the Gambino organized crime family in New York, authorities said. In a related development, federal authorities disclosed two additional grand jury indictments returned last week that accuse some of the same men of distributing cocaine in the Stamford area. Most of those charged in the gambling case are accused of collecting bets from betters, transferring the wagers to offshore, Internet-based gambling sites and distributing winnings.

Human trafficking Human trafficking is the trade of humans, most commonly for the purpose of sexual slavery, forced labor or commercial sexual exploitation for the trafficker or others.[1][2] This may encompass providing a spouse in the context of forced marriage,[3][4][5] or the extraction of organs or tissues,[6][7] including for surrogacy and ova removal.[8] Human trafficking can occur within a country or trans-nationally. Human trafficking is a crime against the person because of the violation of the victim's rights of movement through coercion and because of their commercial exploitation. Human trafficking is the trade in people, and does not necessarily involve the movement of the person from one place to another. Human trafficking represented an estimated $31.6 billion of international trade per annum in 2010.[9] Human trafficking is thought to be one of the fastest-growing activities of trans-national criminal organizations.[10]

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