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Pragmatic responsive design

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The Business of Responsive Design – December 1st, 2013 – Responsive design affects a lot more than just our website’s layout. From content, and how it’s created, to the structure of teams and organisations can all be affected by the processes responsive web design brings. This post is a rough transcript from my talk at Handheld Conference last week in Cardiff on just that. I’ve a confession to make. I’m an armchair mountaineer. The Eiger Nordwand in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. This is the North Face of the Eiger in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. Andreas Hinterstoisser, a talented German climber, in the meadows below the Eiger enjoying the sunshine. In the winter of 1936, Andreas Hinterstoisser (pictured), Toni Kurtz, Willy Angerer and Edi Rainer set about tackling the face of the Eiger – then unclimbed. Let’s leave that story there for now and come back to it later. Let’s talk about responsive design. Responsive design has changed my work and, ultimately, how I do business. 1. We have a content problem. And they did.

8 Tools and Scripts for Responsive Web Design At Theme Trust, we recently launched our first responsive WordPress theme. Since it was also my first time building a responsive website, I had to do some learning and research. Along the way, I discovered some interesting techniques, useful resources, and handy tools to help with the task. So in this article, I’m sharing some of those tools and scripts I came across that make developing a responsive website a whole lot easier. FitText FitText makes font-sizes flexible. Respond A fast & lightweight polyfill for min/max-width CSS3 Media Queries (for IE 6-8, and more) Adobe Device Central CS5.5 Adobe® Device Central CS5.5 software simplifies the production of innovative and compelling content for mobile phones, tablets, and consumer electronic devices. Responsive Web Design Sketch Sheets During Denise Jacobs’ workshop on CSS3 at ConvergeSE 2011, I was inspired to make these responsive web design sketch sheets to help think through layouts for various devices. Golden Grid System Skeleton 815 shares

Responsive Web Design Patterns | This Is Responsive Responsive Patterns A collection of patterns and modules for responsive designs. Submit a pattern Layout Reflowing Layouts Equal Width Off Canvas Source-Order Shift Lists Grid Block Navigation Single-Level Multi-level Breadcrumbs Pagination Images Responsive Image Techniques Media/Data Video Fluid Video Iframes Tables Charts & Graphs Responsive Chart Forms Basic Forms Text Lettering Fittext Footnotes Responsive Footnotes Modules Carousel Tabs Accordion Messaging Lightbox

10 Excellent Tools for Responsive Web Design By Jason Gross So, you’ve decided to venture into the creation of responsive web designs. Wonderful! So now, you’ve determined that it would be beneficial to create responsive web designs. Tools have started to spring up to provide us with shortcuts and helpers for common responsive web design tasks. I divided the tools in this list into four categories: Responsive typographyFlexible imagesResponsive web page layoutsTesting and cross-browser support Responsive Typography First, let’s look at two tools (out of the many out there) that allow us to create beautiful, adaptive typography. 1. Lettering.js, a jQuery plugin for controlling the appearance of your web type, is a great tool to help designers get a chokehold on their typography. In the context of responsive design, Lettering.js gives designers precise control over typography characteristics such as spacing, leading and kerning in order to produce an optimal reading experience in various visual spaces. 2. Flexible Images 3. imgSizer.js 4.

Designing for Breakpoints Jeremy Keith notes that what happens between the breakpoints is just as important as the breakpoints themselves—perhaps even more so. While I agree with this, we do have to start somewhere. In a way, this part of the process reminds me of storyboarding, or creating animation keyframes, with the in-between frames being developed later. We’re going to do that here. Let’s say you’ve chosen three basic design directions from your thumbnails. When thinking about major breakpoints, remember to think about device classes . Rough sketches of major breakpoints can help you determine: Whether or not more major breakpoints are needed Which design choice will be the most labor intensive; you might opt for a design that will better fit within time and budget constraints Whether or not a particular device class has been neglected or needs further consideration What technologies you’ll need to develop the design responsively So where and when will you sketch minor breakpoints ? Text Navigation Tables

Responsive Layouts, Responsively Wireframed Responsive layouts, responsively wireframed Made with HTML/CSS (no images, no JS*) this is a simple interactive experiment with responsive design techniques. Use the buttons top-right to toggle between desktop and mobile layouts. Using simple layout wireframes, this illustrates how a series of pages could work across these different devices, by simulating how the layout of each page would change responsively, to suit the context. Responsive layouts? Producing static wireframes to design layouts for websites, web applications and user-interfaces has worked well for a long time. However, this solution creates a new problem: How should we go about the process of designing these variable layouts? Enter, responsive wireframes? The 'wireframes' on this page (which are only very simple, high-level examples) were created with HTML/CSS, and some argue that this is the answer; to design in the browser. So which is better? Traditional wireframes? HTML? So, what's the answer? Just wondering...

RWD Summit 2014 - The online, live Responsive Web... Registration Invalid quantity. Please enter a quantity of 1 or more. The quantity you chose exceeds the quantity available. Please enter your name. Please enter an email address. Please enter a valid email address. Please enter your message or comments. Please enter the code as shown on the image. Please select the date you would like to attend. Please enter a valid email address in the To: field. Please enter a subject for your message. Please enter a message. You can only send this invitations to 10 email addresses at a time. $$$$ is not a properly formatted color. Please limit your message to $$$$ characters. $$$$ is not a valid email address. Please enter a promotional code. Sold Out Pending You have exceeded the time limit and your reservation has been released. The purpose of this time limit is to ensure that registration is available to as many people as possible. This option is not available anymore. Please read and accept the waiver. All fields marked with * are required. US Zipcodes need to be 5 digits.

Frameless Common Techniques in Responsive Web Design In previous articles, I talked about why the Web is ready for responsive design and how a site owner can use the context of a user’s device and screen real estate to provide a contextually relevant experience to users across screens of various sizes, including PCs, phones and consoles. In this article, I’ll dive into some of the most common practices for building responsive site layouts and experiences. I’ll describe the emerging and available techniques for site layouts that flexibly resize based on screen real estate (referred to as “fluid grids”) so as to ensure that users get complete experiences across whatever screen size they are using. As you play with some of the techniques I describe, here are a few ways to test what your site looks like on different devices resolutions: Benjamin Keen has a responsive Web design bookmarklet that you can add to your Favorites bar (or Bookmarks bar) on your browser of choice. Figure 1. Media Queries What Does “Pixel” Mean Anymore? Figure 2.

Multi-Device Layout Patterns Through fluid grids and media query adjustments, responsive design enables Web page layouts to adapt to a variety of screen sizes. As more designers embrace this technique, we're not only seeing a lot of innovation but the emergence of clear patterns as well. I cataloged what seem to be the most popular of these patterns for adaptable multi-device layouts. To get a sense of emerging responsive design layout patterns, I combed through all the examples curated on the Media Queries gallery site several times. Mostly Fluid The most popular pattern was perhaps surprisingly simple: a multi-column layout that introduces larger margins on big screens, relies on fluid grids and images to scale from large screens down to small screen sizes, and stacks columns vertically in its narrowest incarnations (illustrated below). I dubbed this pattern "mostly fluid" because the core structure of the layout really doesn't change until the smallest screen width. Column Drop Layout Shifter Tiny Tweaks Off Canvas

Web Professional Trends for 2013 – “Responsive Design” Interview with Tim Kadlec In this ten minute interview Tim Kadlec, author, web developer, author, podcaster and the co-founder of Breaking Development, one of the first conferences dedicated to web design and development for mobile devices we learn about her perspective on the topic of Web Professional Trends for 2013 complete with an overview of the mobile device landscape, Responsive Design, opportunities and challenges for Web professionals in the New Year. Specifically we learn: * How Mobile changes everything * Increasing diversity of mobile including size and platforms * How do we keep pace with tablets and Web TV’s? More about Responsive Design According to Wikipedia, Responsive web design (often abbreviated to RWD) is an approach to web design in which a site is crafted to provide an optimal viewing experience—easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling—across a wide range of devices (from desktop computer monitors to mobile phones). Elements of responsive web design (RWD)

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