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Project-Based Learning Professional Development Guide

Project-Based Learning Professional Development Guide
An overview of the Edutopia professional development guide for teaching how to use project-based learning in the classroom. Edutopia.org's Project-Based Learning professional development guide can be used for a two- to three-hour session, or expanded for a one- to two-day workshop, and is divided into two parts. Part one is a guided process, designed to give participants a brief introduction to project-based learning (PBL), and answers the questions "Why is PBL important?", "What is PBL about?", and "How does PBL work?" Part two assigns readings and activities for experiential PBL. Students Follow the Butterflies' Migration: Teacher Frances Koontz shows students a symbolic butterfly sent from children in Mexico. The Resources for PBL page includes a PowerPoint presentation (including presenter notes), which can be shown directly from the website or downloaded for use as a stand-alone slide show, and sample session schedules. Continue to the next section of the guide, Why Is PBL Important?

http://www.edutopia.org/project-based-learning-guide

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The 8 Elements of PBL: A Model Project As most of you know, the uber gods of PBL are BIE. I was first introduced to the BIE PBL ‘model’ from mate Dean Groom who handed me over what I still refer to as my ‘PBL Bible’ – a ring-binder full of the BIE Freebies that help teachers plan effective projects and keep students on track as they move through the different phases of each project. The cool thing is that you can use as much or as little as you want … PBL is a very personal process that (like all good teaching) should be tailored to the expertise and needs of the teacher and students. However, there are 8 Elements of Project Based Learning that can be called the ‘essential elements’ of PBL … keeping an eye on these and ‘testing’ your project design based on them can help you determine if what you’re creating isn’t just a ‘project’. I really like this statement from BIE contrasting PBL and traditional ‘projects’: The Emo Project

Project-Based Learning Research Review Editor's Note: This article was originally written by Vanessa Vega, with subsequent updates made by the Edutopia staff. Studies have proven that when implemented well, project-based learning (PBL) can increase retention of content and improve students' attitudes towards learning, among other benefits. Edutopia's PBL research review explores the vast body of research on the topic and helps make sense of the results.

McClelland's Human Motivation Theory - Team Management Training From MindTools.com Discovering What Drives Members of Your Team Do you know what motivates team members? © iStockphoto/stevecoleccs One of your team members recently created a report that was so thorough and well-written that the board of directors asked you to make sure that she was praised for her efforts. Tech2Learn - Project-Based Learning The following resource page was created by Brenda Sherry and Peter Skillen for PBL Teacher Workshops: Project-Based Learning is an educational approach that falls under the umbrella of inquiry learning and is described in many different ways. Here are some references: Evidence that PBL Works Many of us out there know that project-based learning (PBL) inspires students to understand core content knowledge more deeply and gain key skills for success in college and career. Many of us have also directly contributed to results for students on state tests, college-going, and college persistence metrics. In addition, we know from surveys and focus groups that most of our students are engaged and excited about learning; however, until now, we did not have a rigorous experimental design study approved by the United States Department of Education. The Data Here's some exciting news: the Regional Education Laboratory West (REL West), just released a report called: Effects of Problem Based Economics on High School Economics Instruction.

Free Resources and Tools for "Authentic" Assessment New York's School of the Future shares their assessment plans and rubrics, classroom projects, schedules, web links, and other resources to help you implement "authentic" assessment today. The current faculty and administrators have worked closely on a host of innovations in assessment and curriculum planning over several years. The keys, they say, are trust, transparency, and collaboration -- and providing the professional development and training teachers need to succeed. Credit: Tom LeGoff Note: The School of the Future is part of a network of New York schools that develops and uses its own assessment techniques, referred to as DYOs. The school also uses Tasks on Demand, or unannounced assessments that do not provide supports for the students, in order to measure their learning at regular intervals.

Research-Supported PBL Practices At one New Tech Network high school, strategies backed by research make project-based learning effective and engaging for teachers and students. At Manor New Technology High School in Manor, Texas, several research-based practices interact to promote successful inquiry-based learning: Manor New Tech is part of the New Tech Network, a nonprofit that works with schools and districts around the country providing services and support to help reform learning through project-based learning (PBL). Welcome to the American Sports Institute Flow States and Student Engagement in the Classroom David Shernoff, Ph.D. Wisconsin Center for Education Research University of Wisconsin - Madison Statement to the California State Assembly Education Committee State Capitol • February 27, 2002

What is important about PBL and student learning? How does this change your role as teacher? by teresacoffman Aug 16

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