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The 5 E Learning Cycle Model

The 5 E Learning Cycle Model
Priming the Pump: Peter Elbow's prompts to help students explore topics, objects, places, issues Questions to help a student write about someone s/he has studied or read about: · Describe _ as an ordinary person. · What was/is special or unique about _ ? · Imagine _ were the opposite sex: describe the life s/he would have lived. · What if _ had lived in a different era, such as _ : describe the life s/he would have lived. · Make up or guess what might have been an important event in _'s childhood. · Create a soap opera plot with _ in it. · What does _ most need to cry about? · What should _ be most appreciated for? · What would _'s mother or father say about _ ? · What would _ be likely to dream about? Questions to help a student write about someone's life as a whole: · What about _'s life remained unchanged? · Describe _'s life and character as determined by important changes or turning points. · Imagine you believe people are truly free and that they somehow choose or cause what happens to them.

If You Havent Got Anything Nice To Say He was in the first third grade class I taught at Saint Mary's School in Morris, Minn. All 34 of my students were dear to me, but Mark Eklund was one in a million. Very neat in appearance, but had that happy-to-be-alive attitude that made even his occasional mischievousness delightful. Mark talked incessantly. I had to remind him again and again that talking without permission was not acceptable. I didn't know what to make of it at first, but before long I became accustomed to hearing it many times a day One morning my patience was growing thin when Mark talked once too often, and then I made a novice-teacher's mistake. I remember the scene as if it had occurred this morning. At the end of the year I was asked to teach junior-high math. One Friday, things just didn't feel right. That Saturday, I wrote down the name of each student on a separate sheet of paper, and I listed what everyone else had said about that individual. The exercise had accomplished its purpose. - Sister Helen P.

Sixteen Qualities Of A Good Teacher ǀ SlingingtheBull.com. Good teachers are rare, and few people, including school administrators who hire teachers, know what it takes to be one. Although some of the qualities of good teachers are subtle, many of them are identifiable. Here is a list of sixteen traits that excellent teachers have in common: 1. You can’t teach what you don’t know. 2. No teacher should be expected to have much patience with individuals whose lack of discipline, immaturity, or indolence interrupts the work of other students. 3. All good teachers are intellectually curious and naturally driven by their interests in keeping abreast of changes in their fields. 4. Good teachers are confident in their abilities to sense where students are in the learning process and in their students’ abilities to learn material that is presented in a logical and graduated fashion. 5. Talented teachers are able to work with students with varying levels of maturity and knowledge. 6. 7. Teachers must have plans and stick to them. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Collaborize Classroom - Online Education Technology for Teachers and Students The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator The Differentiator is based on Bloom's Taxonomy, Kaplan and Gould's Depth and Complexity, and David Chung's product menu. Try It In: French Dutch • Tweet It • Like Byrdseed • Pin It Students will judge the ethics of the [click to edit] using a textbook and create an essay in groups of three. Revised Bloom's Taxonomy adapted from "A Taxonomy for Learning,Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives" by Anderson and Krathwohl Depth and Complexity adapted from The Flip Book by Sandra N. Depth Big Idea Unanswered Questions Ethics Patterns Rules Language of the Discipline Essential Details Trends Complexity Multiple Points Of View Change Over Time Across the Disciplines Imperatives Origin Convergence Parallels Paradox Contribution Key Words Consequences Motivations Implications Significance Adapted from David Chung and The Flip Book, Too by Sandra N. Group Size One Two Three Four

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