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Open-source governance

Open-source governance
Open-source governance is a political philosophy which advocates the application of the philosophies of the open source and open content movements to democratic principles in order to enable any interested citizen to add to the creation of policy, as with a wiki document. Legislation is democratically opened to the general citizenry, employing their collective wisdom to benefit the decision-making process and improve democracy.[1] Theories on how to constrain, limit or enable this participation vary however as much as any other political philosophy or ideology. Accordingly there is no one dominant theory of how to go about authoring legislation with this approach. There are a wide array of projects and movements which are working on building open-source governance systems.[2] Applications of the principles[edit] In practice, several applications have evolved and been used by actual democratic institutions in the developed world:[3] Common and simultaneous policy[edit] History[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_governance

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Direct democracy Direct democracy (also known as pure democracy)[1] is a form of democracy in which people decide (e.g. vote on, form consensus on, etc.) policy initiatives directly, as opposed to a representative democracy in which people vote for representatives who then decide policy initiatives.[2] Depending on the particular system in use, it might entail passing executive decisions, the use of sortition, making laws, directly electing or dismissing officials and conducting trials. Two leading forms of direct democracy are participatory democracy and deliberative democracy. Most countries that are representative democracies allow for three forms of political action that provide limited direct democracy: referendum (plebiscite), initiative, and recall[citation needed]. Referendums can include the ability to hold a binding vote on whether a given law should be rejected.

Guideline for External Use of Web 2.0 1. Publication Date The publication date of this guideline is November 18th, 2011, and it will be reviewed and updated on an ongoing basis as appropriate. Open Source Life: How the open movement will change everything Consider this: in just a few short years, the open-source encyclopedia Wikipedia has made closed-source encyclopedias obsolete — both the hard-bound kind and the CD-ROM or commercial online kind. Goodbye World Book and Brittanica. Sure, these companies still exist, but their customer base is rapidly shrinking as more and more people would rather go with Wikipedia — it’s free, it’s easy to use, and it’s much, much more up-to-date. This is but one example of how the concept of open source has changed our lives already. Over the next 10 years or so, we’ll be seeing many more examples, and the effects could change just about every aspect of our lives. The open-source concept was popularized through GNU and the GPL, and it has spread ever since, in an increasingly rapid manner.

SILK: Social Innovation Lab Kent SILK is a small team based within Kent County Council that was set up in 2007 to ‘do policy differently’. Over the past 4 years we have been doing projects which have demonstrated the benefits of working in a different way and have developed a Methodology and Toolkit which provide a structure for the way we work. We believe that the best solutions come from the people who are closest to the issue; this could be service users, residents or frontline staff. We go much further than community consultation and we believe that people should be actively involved in the design of services that they are going to use or deliver.

What Is Anarchism? An Introduction Publisher’s Introduction We are often asked to explain what anarchism is all about, and hope to publish a revised and expanded version of Nicolas Walter’s popular About Anarchism when it is ready. Meanwhile we suggested to Donald Rooum, creator of the anarchist Wildcat cartoons, that he should produce a pamphlet on Anarchism. Better User Orientation through Navigation Users are constantly orienting themselves on your site. How can you help? Users surfing the Internet orient themselves not unlike migrating birds. Each species of bird has her own special way of orienting, building a mental map of where she is and where she wants to go. Some, like pigeons, rely heavily on magnetic fields.

Government Are we on the cusp of seeing dramatic changes in the way governments operate by publishing and consuming open data? Mark Headd, Developer Evangelism at Accela seems to think so. Earlier this year, Croatian political party ORaH published a new policy that relies heavily on open source solutions, addresses the dangers off vendor lock-in, and insists on open document standards. Best of all, they did it the open source way. The Open Election Data Initiative wants to give access to election data for a true picture of an election process, including how candidates are certified, how and which voters are registered, what happens on election day, whether results are accurate, and how complaints are resolved. thinkpublic We believe in a collaborative approach to designing things, including service, products and communications. We have 9 years of experience using design to help public-facing organisations to better serve their customers whilst tackling big social challenges. What we bring

Libertarian socialism Overview[edit] Libertarian socialism is a Western philosophy with diverse interpretations, though some general commonalities can be found in its many incarnations. It advocates a worker-oriented system of production and organization in the workplace that in some aspects radically departs from neoclassical economics in favor of democratic cooperatives or common ownership of the means of production (socialism).[38] They propose that this economic system be executed in a manner that attempts to maximize the liberty of individuals and minimize concentration of power or authority (libertarianism). August 17, 1860 edition of libertarian Communist publication Le Libertaire edited by Joseph Déjacque. The vision for government corporate websites in the Single Domain (with product wireframes) This is the third in a series of posts sharing progress on how we are tackling objective two of the single domain ‘beta’ project: specifically the creation and test of a unified publishing platform capable of replacing many of the websites which government organisations currently run across separate domains – like dh.gov.uk or bis.gov.uk – to provide information on who they are and what they do. Having first defined the concept for this shared platform, then analysed users’ needs, the next step in early September was to establish and communicate the product vision. Here is an extract of that vision work – a set of ‘wireframe’ drawings of what, back then, I thought this product might need to end up looking like to the user. If you’re used to looking at wireframes, skip this paragraph. For everyone else, I should make clear that these drawings are by no means intended to give an impression of visual design.

Bologna's Second Attack with Pepper Spray Gradually the exploits of Detective Inspector Anthony (Tony Baloney) Bologna have eeked their way even into the mainstream media. It has become well known that he engages, in violation of policy, in an O.C. (Pepper) Spray attack on four defenseless women without provocation.

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