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Slavic mythology

Slavic mythology
Many generations of Slavic artists were inspired by their national folklore: Ilya Yefimovich Repin, Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom (1876) Slavic mythology is the mythological aspect of the polytheistic religion that was practised by the Slavs before Christianisation. The religion possesses many common traits with other religions descended from the Proto-Indo-European religion. Old Slavic religion evolved over more than a thousand years and some parts of it were from neolithic or possibly even mesolithic times. The Earth was worshipped as Mat Zemlya and there were no temples. Rituals were performed in nature. Modern wooden statue of Perun, the god of thunder and lightning, Ruthenia Sources of information[edit] Unlike Greek, Indian or Egyptian mythology, there are no first-hand records for the study of Slavic mythology. Written sources[edit] Artistic representation of Saxo Grammaticus Archaeological remains[edit] The remains of several Slavic shrines have also been discovered.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_mythology

Related:  Gods of Earth and Nature

Terra (Roman mythology) The word tellus, telluris is also a Latin common noun for "land, territory; earth," as is terra, "earth, ground". In literary uses, particularly in poetry, it may be ambiguous as to whether the goddess, a personification, or the common noun is meant. This article preserves the usage of the ancient sources regarding Tellus or Terra. Dedicatory inscription to Terra Mater fulfilling a vow (votum), 1st century AD The two words terra and tellus are thought to derive from the formulaic phrase tersa tellus, meaning "dry land".

Sadko Sadko (Russian: Садко) is a character of Russian medieval epic (bylina). He was an adventurer, merchant and gusli musician from Novgorod. Synopsis[edit] Sadko played the gusli on the shores of a lake. Clouded leopard declared extinct in Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of China (Taiwan) A Formosan cloud leopard, now extinct in Taiwan. By Douglas Main, OurAmazingPlanet Koschei In Slavic folklore, Koschei (Russian: Коще́й, tr. Koshchey, IPA: [kɐˈɕːej], also Kashchei or Kashchey; Ukrainian: Кощій, Koshchiy; Polish: Kościej; Czech: Kostěj) is an archetypal male antagonist, described mainly as abducting the hero's wife. None of the existing tales actually describes his appearance, though in book illustrations, cartoons and cinema he has been most frequently represented as a very old and ugly-looking man.

Etruscan mythology The Etruscans were a people with a distinct language and culture during the period of earliest European writing, in the Mediterranean Iron Age in the second half of the first millennium B.C. They ranged over the Po Valley and some of its alpine slopes, southward along the west coast of Italy, most intensely in Etruria with enclaves as far south as Campania, and inland into the Appennine mountains. Their prehistory can be traced with certainty to about 1000 BC. At their height about 500 BC, they were a significant maritime power with a presence in Sardinia and the Aegean Sea.

Venus figurines "Venus figurines" is an umbrella term for a number of prehistoric statuettes of women portrayed with similar physical attributes from the Upper Palaeolithic, mostly found in Europe, but with finds as far east as Irkutsk Oblast, Siberia, extending their distribution to much of Eurasia, from the Pyrenees to Lake Baikal. Most of them date to the Gravettian period, but there are a number of early examples from the Aurignacian, including the Venus of Hohle Fels, discovered in 2008, carbon dated to at least 35,000 years ago, and late examples of the Magdalenian, such as the Venus of Monruz, aged about 11,000 years. These figurines were carved from soft stone (such as steatite, calcite or limestone), bone or ivory, or formed of clay and fired. The latter are among the oldest ceramics known. In total, over a hundred such figurines are known; virtually all of modest size, between 4 cm and 25 cm in height. They are some of the earliest works of prehistoric art.

List of Slavic mythological figures This is a list of Slavic deities, spirits and mythological creatures. Deities[edit] Major gods[edit] Other gods[edit] A moment of silence for the Western Black Rhino Officially extinct Another beautiful species that we won't see again. The western black rhino, which is a sub-species of black rhino, was was once widespread in the savanna of sub-Saharan Africa, but no more. The last individual was spotted in 2006, and after years without any new sightings, it was officially declared extinct by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), who maintains the famous Red List of Threatened Species. Buyan For the Albanian village, see Bujan. In Slavic mythology, Buyan (Буя́н) is described as a mysterious island in the ocean with the ability to appear and disappear. Three brothers – Northern, Western, and Eastern Winds – live there. Some scholars interpret Buyan as a sort of Proto-Indo-European Otherworld (see Fortunate Islands). Others assert that Buyan is actually a Slavic name for some real island, most likely Rügen.[1] See also[edit]

Creation Science Big Bang Theory Cosmology Evolution Large Hadron Collider Out of Africa Paleontology Panspermia and Exogenesis Physical Sciences Precession of the Equinoxes Primordial Soup Theory Mathematics 12 Around 1 Geometry Sacred Geometry Fibonacci Numbers Tube Torus Flower of Life Golden Ratio, Golden Mean, Divine Proportion, Phi Metatron's Cube Vesica Piscis Fractals Chaos Theories Reality as a Consciousness Hologram Consciousness Ellie's Theories Holographic Universe Reality Mythology Adam and Eve Creation Myths by Country and Civilization Native American Creation Myths Origin Beliefs, Creation Myths Gods and Goddesses Ancient Civilizations Clockwork Universe Theory Creationism Gods and Goddesses Files Earth's History in Art Hermeticism, Hermes Intelligent Design Sumerian Gods, Reptilians Flood Stories, Gilgamesh, Noah

Vergin (United w/ Pachamama after Spanish Invasion) Roman Catholic veneration of Mary, the mother of Jesus, which has grown over time in importance, is manifested not only in prayer but also in the visual arts, poetry and music.[2][3][4][5] Popes have encouraged it, while also taking steps to reform some manifestations of it.[note 1] The Holy See has insisted on the importance of distinguishing "true from false devotion, and authentic doctrine from its deformations by excess or defect".[6] There are significantly more titles, feasts and venerative Marian practices among Roman Catholics than in other Christian traditions.[7] Marian Movements and Societies with millions of members have arisen from belief in events such as Akita, Fatima and Lourdes and other reasons.[12] From Christ to Mary in the Roman Catholic tradition[edit] Theological basis for the veneration of Mary[edit] Mysteries of Christ and Mary[edit]

A Journey Through Slavic Culture This post is the beginning of a series of articles on various aspects of Slavic mythology that I hope to publish on a near-weekly basis. As this article is the beginning of something new, I believe I should begin with the greatest figure in the Slavic pantheon, Perun. Often compared to Thor of the Norse mythological world, Perun was considered the highest of all gods and was one of Svarog’s three sons. Simurgh Simurgh (/ˌsɪˈmərɡ/; Persian: سیمرغ‎), also spelled simorgh, simurg, simoorg or simourv, also known as Angha (Persian: عنقا‎), is a benevolent, mythical flying creature. The figure can be found in all periods of Greater Iranian art and literature and is also evident in the iconography of medieval Armenia,[1] the Byzantine empire,[2] and other regions that were within the sphere of Persian cultural influence.[clarification needed] The mythical bird is also found in the mythology of the Turkic peoples of Central Asia and is called Kerkés, Semrug, Semurg, Samran, and Samruk.[3][4] The name simurgh derives from Middle Persian Pahlavi sēnmurw[5][6] (and earlier sēnmuruγ), also attested in Middle Persian Pāzand as sīna-mrū.

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