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Slavic mythology

Slavic mythology
Many generations of Slavic artists were inspired by their national folklore: Ilya Yefimovich Repin, Sadko in the Underwater Kingdom (1876) Slavic mythology is the mythological aspect of the polytheistic religion that was practised by the Slavs before Christianisation. The religion possesses many common traits with other religions descended from the Proto-Indo-European religion. Old Slavic religion evolved over more than a thousand years and some parts of it were from neolithic or possibly even mesolithic times. Modern wooden statue of Perun, the god of thunder and lightning, Ruthenia Sources of information[edit] Unlike Greek, Indian or Egyptian mythology, there are no first-hand records for the study of Slavic mythology. Written sources[edit] The most numerous and richest written records are of West Slavic paganism, particularly of Wendish and Polabian tribes, who were forcibly made Christian only at the end of the 12th century. Artistic representation of Saxo Grammaticus Related:  FolkloreGods of Earth and NatureEastern European

Tengrism "Tengriism" redirects here. For the (unrelated) Japanese religion, see Tenriism. Tengrism (sometimes stylized as Tengriism), occasionally referred to as Tengrianism , is a modern term[1] for a Central Asian religion characterized by features of shamanism, animism, totemism, both polytheism and monotheism,[2][3][4][5] and ancestor worship. As a modern revival, Tengrism has been advocated among intellectual circles of the Turkic nations of Central Asia, including Tatarstan, Buryatia, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan, in the years following the dissolution of the Soviet Union (1990s to present).[9] It is still actively practiced and undergoing an organised revival in Yakutia, Khakassia, Tuva, and other Turkic nations in Siberia. Khukh and Tengri literally mean "blue" and "sky" in Mongolian and modern Mongolians still pray to "Munkh Khukh Tengri" ("Eternal Blue Sky"). Background A scene from Kırk banyosu (bath of 40) in Turkey. It is said that the Huns of the Northern Caucasus believed in two gods.

Terra (Roman mythology) The word tellus, telluris is also a Latin common noun for "land, territory; earth," as is terra, "earth, ground". In literary uses, particularly in poetry, it may be ambiguous as to whether the goddess, a personification, or the common noun is meant. This article preserves the usage of the ancient sources regarding Tellus or Terra. Dedicatory inscription to Terra Mater fulfilling a vow (votum), 1st century AD The two words terra and tellus are thought to derive from the formulaic phrase tersa tellus, meaning "dry land". The 4th-century AD Latin commentator Servius distinguishes between tellus and terra in usage. Varro identifies Terra Mater with Ceres: Ovid distinguishes between Tellus as the locus ("site, location") of growth, and Ceres as its causa ("cause, agent").[13] Mater, the Latin word for "mother," is often used as an honorific for goddesses, including Vesta, who was represented as a virgin. Detail from a sarcophagus depicting a Mother Earth figure (3rd century AD)

Clouded leopard declared extinct in Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of China (Taiwan) A Formosan cloud leopard, now extinct in Taiwan. By Douglas Main, OurAmazingPlanet The Formosan clouded leopard, a clouded-leopard subspecies native to Taiwan, is now extinct, according to a team of zoologists. "There is little chance that the clouded leopard still exists in Taiwan," zoologist Chiang Po-jen told Taiwan's Central News Agency (CNA). "There may be a few of them, but we do not think they exist in any significant numbers." Zoologists from Taiwan and the United States have looked for the animal on and off since 2001, to no avail. Now, the only one left in the country is a stuffed specimen at the National Taiwan Museum, zoologist Liu Jian-nan told CNA. The range of clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa) spans from the hills of the Himalayas to Southeast Asia to China.

Finnish mythology Finnish mythology is the mythology that goes with Finnish paganism, of which a modern revival is practiced by a small percentage of the Finnish people. It has many features shared with fellow Finnic Estonian mythology and its non-Finnic neighbours, the Balts and the Scandinavians. Some of their myths are also distantly related to the myths of other Finno-Ugric speakers like the Samis. Finnish mythology survived within an oral tradition of mythical poem-singing and folklore well into the 19th century. Although the gradual influence of surrounding cultures raised the significance of the sky-god in a monolatristic manner, the father god "Ukko" (Old Man) was originally just a nature spirit like all the others. Study of Finnish mythological and religious history[edit] Cristfried Ganander's Mythologia Fennica, published in 1789, was the first truly scholarly foray into Finnish mythology. The origins and the structure of the world[edit] Structure of the world, according to Finnish mythology.

Norse religion Norse religion refers to the religious traditions of the Norsemen prior to the Christianization of Scandinavia, specifically during the Viking Age. Norse religion is a subset of Germanic paganism, which was practiced in the lands inhabited by the Germanic tribes across most of Northern and Central Europe. Knowledge of Norse religion is mostly drawn from the results of archaeological field work, etymology and early written materials. Terminology[edit] Mjölnir pendants were worn by Norse pagans during the 9th to 10th centuries. Norse religion was a cultural phenomenon, and — like most pre-literate folk beliefs — the practitioners probably did not have a name for their religion until they came into contact with outsiders or competitors. Sources[edit] Knowledge about Norse religion has been gathered from archaeological discoveries and from literature produced after the Christianization of Scandinavia.[2] Literary sources[edit] Saga[edit] Archaeological sources[edit] Worship[edit] Priests[edit]

Venus figurines "Venus figurines" is an umbrella term for a number of prehistoric statuettes of women portrayed with similar physical attributes from the Upper Palaeolithic, mostly found in Europe, but with finds as far east as Irkutsk Oblast, Siberia, extending their distribution to much of Eurasia, from the Pyrenees to Lake Baikal. Most of them date to the Gravettian period, but there are a number of early examples from the Aurignacian, including the Venus of Hohle Fels, discovered in 2008, carbon dated to at least 35,000 years ago, and late examples of the Magdalenian, such as the Venus of Monruz, aged about 11,000 years. These figurines were carved from soft stone (such as steatite, calcite or limestone), bone or ivory, or formed of clay and fired. The latter are among the oldest ceramics known. In total, over a hundred such figurines are known; virtually all of modest size, between 4 cm and 25 cm in height. Most of them have small heads, wide hips, and legs that taper to a point. Description[edit]

A moment of silence for the Western Black Rhino Officially extinct Another beautiful species that we won't see again. The western black rhino, which is a sub-species of black rhino, was was once widespread in the savanna of sub-Saharan Africa, but no more. Wikimedia/Public Domain The IUCN warns that other rhinos could follow saying Africa's northern white rhino is "teetering on the brink of extinction" while Asia's Javan rhino is "making its last stand" due to continued poaching and lack of conservation." Conservation efforts certainly are not futile! Here are some black rhinos (though obviously not western black rhinos...) filmed by the BBC: Via CNN See also: Aw, cute!

Latvian mythology The seasons, festivals and numerous deities of historic Latvian mythology reflected the essential agrarian nature of Latvian tribal life. Much of its symbolism (an example is the pērkonkrusts or thunder cross) is ancient. These seasons and festivals are still celebrated today—for example, Jāņi is a national holiday.[1] History[edit] Territories of Baltic tribes at beginning of the 13th century. There are few reports of Baltic tribes, the ancestors of modern Latvians, and their mythology until Christianization in the 13th century. In the 18th and 19th centuries, it was assumed that Baltic tribes were originally one nation and thus had the same deities.[4] Early authors trying to reconstruct a Latvian pantheon using data from neighboring regions. At the same time some pagan rites were still practiced. Although research in Latvia could only restart in the 1980s,[2] the 1970s saw the emergence of a folklore movement with members which could be described as neopagans. Celestial deities[edit]

Hittite mythology Seated deity, late Hittite Empire (13th century BC) The understanding of Hittite mythology depends on readings of surviving stone carvings, deciphering of the iconology represented in seal stones, interpreting ground plans of temples: additionally, there are a few images of deities, for the Hittites often worshipped their gods through Huwasi stones, which represented deities and were treated as sacred objects. Gods were often depicted standing on the backs of their respective beasts, or may have been identifiable in their animal form.[3] Overview[edit] Priests and cult sites[edit] The liminal figure mediating between the intimately connected worlds of gods and mankind was the king and priest; in a ritual dating from the Hittite Old Kingdom period: The gods, the Sun-God and the Storm-God, have entrusted to me, the king, the land and my household, so that I, the king, should protect my land and my household, for myself.[5] Deities and their myths[edit] List of Hittite deities[15][edit]

Vergin (United w/ Pachamama after Spanish Invasion) Roman Catholic veneration of Mary, the mother of Jesus, which has grown over time in importance, is manifested not only in prayer but also in the visual arts, poetry and music.[2][3][4][5] Popes have encouraged it, while also taking steps to reform some manifestations of it.[note 1] The Holy See has insisted on the importance of distinguishing "true from false devotion, and authentic doctrine from its deformations by excess or defect".[6] There are significantly more titles, feasts and venerative Marian practices among Roman Catholics than in other Christian traditions.[7] Marian Movements and Societies with millions of members have arisen from belief in events such as Akita, Fatima and Lourdes and other reasons.[12] From Christ to Mary in the Roman Catholic tradition[edit] Theological basis for the veneration of Mary[edit] Mysteries of Christ and Mary[edit] At the centre of this mystery, in the midst of this wonderment of faith, stands Mary. From veneration to theology[edit]

Slavic Mythology - the gods of Russia and Eastern Europe Introduction A strange and wonderful range of fascinating deities ruling across most of Eastern Europe and Russia, from Poland and the Czech Republic to Belarus and the Ukraine. From simple do-it-yourself Gods of Digging A Hole In The Ground to ones with three silver heads and a golden veil in a temple full of wealth, they cover a lot of ground. In Russian the word 'god' is 'bog', and we promise you will never regard bogs in the same way again. There are also a staggering number of legendary characters named 'Ivan'. Part of their fascination is that many Slavic deities are shrouded in mystery, their true nature obliterated by time and rampant Christian conversion. Garbled tales and even invented Gods have been thrown into the mix by well-meaning but bewildered scholars attempting to reconstitute the original beliefs. For an entirely different - but related - pantheon of Gods from this region, see our Baltic mythology section. The Gods told us to do it.

Finnish paganism The elk is a common image in many Finnish petroglyphs Finnish paganism shows many similarities with the religious practices of neighbouring cultures, such as Germanic, Norse and Baltic paganism. However, it has some distinct differences due to the Uralic and Finnic culture of the region. Finnish paganism provided the inspiration for a contemporary pagan movement Suomenusko (Finnish: Finnish faith), which is an attempt to reconstruct the old religion of the Finns. Deities[edit] The Finnish pagans were polytheistic, believing in a number of different deities. Finnish paganism was based on deities of nature, and it evolved in a time where the Finns were highly dependent on the natural world for survival. Major deities[edit] Several key deities were venerated across nearly all of Finland and Karelia. Haltija[edit] Local animistic deities, known as haltijas, were also worshipped. Maan Haltija[edit] Väki Haltija[edit] Different elements and environments had their own haltijas. Soul[edit] Burial[edit]

Pachamama (fertility goddess, Andes) Pachamama is a goddess revered by the indigenous people of the Andes. She is also known as the earth/time mother. [1] In Inca mythology, Mama Pacha or Pachamama is a fertility goddess who presides over planting and harvesting. She causes earthquakes and is typically in the form of a dragon. Etymology[edit] Pachamama is usually translated as Mother Earth, but a more literal translation would be "World Mother" (in Aymara and Quechua. Since there is no equal diction in modern Spanish or English, it was translated by the first Spaniard Chronists[9] as mama = mother / pacha = world or land; and later widened in a modern meaning as the cosmos or the universe).[10] The Inca goddess can be referred to in multiple ways; the primary way being Pachamama. Modern Day Rituals[edit] Household Rituals[edit] The Sunday Parade[edit] A main attraction of the Pachamama festival is the Sunday parade. New Age Worship[edit] Political Usage[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit]

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