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English Online - Articles in Easy Understandable English for Learners

English Online - Articles in Easy Understandable English for Learners
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Twenty-Five Great Ideas for Teaching Current Events Looking for ways to work news into your classroom curriculum? Check out these great ideas for connecting current events to all subjects. Education World is pleased to offer 25 activities -- activities intended to help teachers make use of newspapers and to help students make sense of the news. Also included, at the end of the activity list, is a list of additional activities and Internet resources. This first activity won't make better or more interested news readers of your students -- but it was too interesting not to include in our list! Preserving the news! Listening for details. News-mapping. More news-mapping. News scavenger hunts. A to Z adjectives. Graphing the news. Scanning the page. Abbreviation/acronym search. Local, national, or international? Headline match. The five Ws. A five W variation. Sequencing the facts. Why is it news? Timeliness -- News that is happening right now, news of interest to readers right now. Voice your opinion. Charting the weather. You be the editor.

Article Writing | English Articles Writing is the end product of language competence. Good language skills do not ensure an effective outcome in writing. In order to be a good writer one must be aware of the components and strategies that would make up the core of his writing. Sentence and Paragraph are two important levels which should be mastered before writing a satisfactory article. Accuracy and fluency of your writing are two determining factors, the level of which will either enhance or lower the satisfaction of the reader. Paragraph A good paragraph has 3 essential parts: A. B. C. Writing an Effective Essay Video Tags: academic writing, article writing, paragraph writing, principles of writing

11 no-prep warm up activities | ESLGamesBox 11 no preparation warm up activities to keep your students occupied while you do some last minute photocopying, grab a much needed coffee, etc. (For more stimulating warm up ideas check out Penny Urs’ Five Minute Activities.) Due to popular demand here are 10 more no-prep warmers and fillers. 1. Write a topical vocabulary item on the board. 2. Write a target word vertically down the board, for example. winter. 3. Using whatever resources they have at hand, students find and write down an appropriate adjective that begins with each letter of their first name. 4. Write a sentence on the board but mix up the word order then challenge students to reconstruct the original sentence. 5. Write a sentence on the board but this time scramble the letters of each word. 6. In groups students think of and write down as many facts as they can about bananas (or cats, Belgium, David Beckham, etc.). 7. Students sit in silence for two minutes and write down every sound that they hear. 8. 9. 10. 11.

ESL Reading Worksheets - Short Stories - Free Arbor Day - Marla and Tio plant a tree in the yard. Breakfast - Jack has high cholesterol and has to stop eating donuts. Bus Driver - Adan wants to retire next year when he turns sixty-two. Camping - Bears take over a campsite! Car Accident - Oh, no! Checking Account - Rosa's fiance wants to open a joint checking account. Colds - Pedro has a cold. Dentist - James has a toothache on the right side of his mouth. ESL Teacher - Mrs. ESL Student - Benito is too shy to read in front of his ESL class. Family Dinner - The Smith family starts eating healthy meals. Father's Day Gift - Maria wants to buy her father a special Father's Day gift. Fireman - Fire fighters respond to a fire on Elm Avenue in Bayside. Flag of the United States - The American flag was adopted June 14, 1777. Grand Canyon - The Soto family is at the Grand Canyon in Arizona. Mail Carrier - Van is going to apply for a management position at work. Medical Appointment - Carlos is sick. Mother's Robot - Do families need robots? EL Civics >>

First Fleet: 04/02/2014, Behind the News Recently we celebrated Australia day on the 26th of January. But why do we mark it on that day in particular? To answer that question, Sarah will take you back in time to 1788, to meet some kids who came to Australia on the First Fleet. Kid 1: “My name is John Hudson and I'm nine years old. I've been an orphan ever since I can remember and I made a living sweeping chimneys. Kid 2: “For the theft of one linen shirt, value 10 shillings, five silk stockings, value 5 shillings, one pistol, value 5 shillings, and two aprons, value 2 shillings. Kid 3: “My name is Elizabeth Haywood and I'm 13 years old. Kid 2: “For the theft of one linen gown, value 4 shillings, a silk bonnet value 2 shillings, and a bath cloth cloak, value 1 shilling. In London in the 1700s, gaols were full of people like Elizabeth and John; poor, hungry, unwanted. Reporter: England's laws were really, really harsh. One solution was transportation. Eleven ships were prepared for the voyage to New South Wales.

No more heroes Back in the twentieth century there was a British punk rock song that repeated over and over again the claim that there were "no more heroes anymore". Calmer critics and social commentators have agreed that the age of the hero is over. In the past people had heroes. They were the most prominent figures in the public consciousness - people who had achieved great things, people who had done great deeds - proud, noble leaders and bold pioneers. The myth of the hero, though, could not survive when public life came to be dominated by the mass media. The mass media killed off the heroes and replaced them with celebrities. The mass media is not solely responsible for the death of the hero. The critical gaze of the psychologist and sociologist have also entered public consciousness, adding to the forces tearing down the statues of the past. Having killed the hero we have replaced him with a distinctively modern public figure: the celebrity. CLICK HERE for a little vocabulary revision.

Teaching With Podcasts Home › Professional Development › Strategy Guides Strategy Guide Podcasts are serial recordings, posted regularly online. Podcasts can be used for any purpose a text might serve-they can tell fictional stories, share and comment on recent events, inform listeners about a topic, and persuade listeners to take an action or adopt a stance. Students can produce podcasts that fit any genre, including audio diary entries, analytical commentary on readings or current events, informational recordings that explain concepts, and persuasive and argumentative statements. Review your district's appropriate use policies to determine the requirements for a podcasting site that students can use.

Tiny Texts ESL News New ZealandGrammy Awards » ESL News New Zealand You probably already know that Lorde won two Grammy awards yesterday. She had been nominated for four awards and won two. She won the Best Pop Solo Performance. She and her co-song-writer Joel Little, won the Song of the Year for the song Royals. She performed this song earlier in the ceremony, dressed in a white shirt with black trousers. The Prime Minister and Governor-General sent their congratulations. Her success really shows that in a global world, people from a small country like New Zealander, can achieve international fame. Listen to November 13th 2013 to hear more about international fame for young New Zealanders. Vocabulary nominated (v) – her name was on a list along with a few other namesco-song-writer – Joel and Ella wrote the song togethervenue (n) – place where the ceremony was heldfame (n), famous (adj) – many people know her name Leave a Reply

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