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Beehive Tower is a Honeycomb Inspired Vertical Farm for London

Beehive Tower is a Honeycomb Inspired Vertical Farm for London
The aim of the Beehive Tower is to provide the Canary Wharf community of city dwellers a place to garden and live. The tower’s hexagonal mega structural lattice contains greenhouse spaces that also serve as a place for people to meet and socialize. Each hexagon is 8 stories high and contains 8 duplex apartments. Atop the tower, fourteen Quiet Revolution QR12 turbines collect enough wind to generate 420,000kWh a year. Via CTBUH Images © CTBUH Related:  la ferme du futur

Project Homestead 'Vertical farm' blossoms at meatpacking plant Greens and mushrooms grown at the Plant with homemade sauce and bread by Carla, the plant's mycologist. John Edel is building a zero waste veritcal farm on Chicago's South SideIt has bakers, fish farmer, tea brewer and other farms working with each other to use wasteEdel hopes this will show other businesses the ease of adapting to green initiatives (CNN) -- An old meatpacking plant on Chicago's South Side is being transformed into an eco farm, which its founders says will produce food sustainably, while creating zero waste. American entrepreneur John Edel is the founder of "The Plant," a vertical-farm initiative that he hopes will show people the ease of adapting to green food production in urban living environments. A vertical farm is an urban agriculture concept whereby food is grown in and on top of buildings in city areas. Watch: A farm on every roof top At a certain point I realized if we built an anaerobic digester, we could get our waste down to zero.

Kitchen Compost Pail (Bucket, Bin) – DIY, Easy, and Frugal Making Dirt – Part 1 Note: This is part one of a two part article on compost. Read part two – DIY vermicomposting worm farm – here. I knew I was getting old the day I started to think that making my own garden dirt was cool. Don’t get me wrong… I don’t think I’m old, and I don’t dislike the fact that I am getting older, actually I think it’s pretty cool. Kitchen Compost Buckets Today I want to follow up on a promise I gave to several FiveCentNickel.com readers in my “Breaking Free From a Culture of Temptation” article a while back. A store-bought kitchen composting bucket ($20) Here again, I made my own… and only spent $1.50! Making my own bin was easy, cheap, and satisfying. Store bought kitchen compost bins The $56 option – a stainless steel kitchen compost bucket that employs a charcoal filter to eliminate smells.The $20 option – this bucket is constructed of plastic and also employs a charcoal filter. So What Did I Do? I made my own of course! My homemade, DIY kitchen compost bucket 1. 2.

Plantagon Breaks Ground on its First 'Plantscraper' Vertical Farm in Sweden! Several years ago a Swedish-American company called Plantagon unveiled plans for a series of massive skyscraper greenhouses that stood to transform urban farming in large cities. While the spiraling vertical farms seemed too good to be true at the time, Plantagon broke ground on its very first vertical farm a few weeks ago in Linkoping, Sweden! The "Plantscraper" will grow and supply fresh vegetables while creating solutions to some of the most vexing city pollution issues. Plantagon seems to have traded in its initial geodesic dome design for a sheer tower that both contains and showcases the plants growing inside. Inside the massive glass walls, vegetables will be grown in pots and then transitioned to trays positioned around a giant central helix. Construction on the company’s first enormous vertical greenhouse is expected to take 12 to 16 months. + Plantagon Via treehugger

Everything You Need to Know About Composting With Worms Following my recent blog post on the Do-It-Yourself Vermipod, I’ve been receiving a ton of questions from folks who built Vermipods and are looking for information on how to manage and maintain their new pets. So here’s a compilation called Everything You Need To Know About Composting With Worms… Common Worm Species Eisenia fetida: Pronounced “iSEEnee a FETid a”, is a worm that can process a large amount of organic material in their natural environment. They tolerate large temperature, moisture and pH ranges and can also tolerate handling well. Eisenia andrei is closely related to the Eisenia fetida and is known as the “red tiger”. Lumbricus rubellus is another worm that can be used for vermiposting. Bedding Materials Worms, like you and me, need both protein and carbohydrates to get a balanced diet. Environmental Conditions Composting worms originate from warmer parts of the globe, typically in wet regions. These are the conditions that the worms thrive in. How Much do They Eat? Amendments

studiomobile: seawater vertical farm mar 05, 2009 studiomobile: seawater vertical farm ‘seawater vertical farm’ by studiomobile image courtesy studiomobile during the last two years italian architectural firm studiomobile have been working in the united arab emirates, developing housing projects and infrastructure projects. most recently they developed their concept ‘seawater vertical farm’. the seawater vertical farm uses seawater to cool and humidify greenhouses and to convert sufficient humidity back in to fresh water to irrigate the crops. the project has been presented in dubai where there is an absence of fresh water and local cultivations, a problem of urban transport and a high soil value, making this concept a feasible one. ‘seawater vertical farm’ image courtesy studiomobile inside the ‘seawater vertical farm’ image courtesy studiomobile ‘seawater vertical farm’ diagram of how the farm works image courtesy studiomobile how the concept works: ridhika naidoo I designboom

How to build My 50 Dollar Greenhouse First off – you really can build this thing very cheaply, but to do so you have to recycle, freecycle, and scrounge. If you just go out and buy new everything it will probably cost over $200 – still not bad all in all.This Article is featured in Jan 2010 issue of Birds and Blooms Magazine!Want to find out if this thing works before you read all this? Read 6 months in the Greenhouse first.Want to see what happens when a few inches of wet snow accumulates on this? Collapse! My $50 Greenhouse Welcome Stumbleupon Gardeners! Materials list Construction Steps Hind Sight – What I would do differently The planning is over and construction on my hoop house greenhouse has begun. After some research I’ve decided to build the structure of the hoop house out of 20 ft. joints of three quarter inch PVC plumbing pipe. My hoop house green house is going to be 11 feet wide and 15 feet long, and will be about seven and a half feet tall in the center. If your Greenhouse is too Flat it will collapse! Thusly

Growing up - is vertical farming the future? Are high rise farms, vertical farming, and urban farming the solution to feeding our growing population? More and more architects, politicians and urban planners are latching on to the idea that something radical has to be done to feed the world’s rapidly growing cities in the coming decades. And not just cities, what about the world’s increasing arid zones, and areas of depleted farming land? What about the pressures to control carbon emissions and reduce food miles? These questions have led us at Valcent Products in Cornwall to design VertiCrop – a vertical growing system which is now selling worldwide. Because VertiCrop is designed for controlled environment growing, plant growth can be fully optimised, meaning good quality produce, and more crop cycles per annum. So, if it is as good as it sounds, will VertiCrop become the standard means of production? It’s predicted that there will be 9bn of us on the planet by 2050, and the majority of those in cities.

How to Grow 100 Pounds of Potatoes in 4 Square Feet | Apartment Therapy Re-Nest On many occasions, we've been tempted to grow our own potatoes. They're fairly low maintenance, can be grown in a pot or in the ground, last a fairly long time if stored properly, and can be very nutritious (high in potassium and vitamin C). Here's more incentive: according to this article, you can grow 100 pounds of potatoes in 4 sq. feet. Learn how after the jump... According to this article from the Seattle Times, potatoes planted inside a box with this method can grow up to 100 pounds of potatoes in just 4 square feet. Lumber Seed potatoes Soil Careful attention to watering The Times' guide for building a potato growing box yields up to a 100 lbs. of potatoes in a mere 4 square feet is shown below: Plant as early as April or as late as August 1, with an approximated 3 month till harvest turnaround time. Here are some pointers from the article: Cut apart larger seed potatoes, making sure there are at least two eyes in each piece you plant. Seattle Times via LifeHacker.

THE FUTURE OF THE FOOD SUPPLY IN THE CITY REVISITED: IS VERTICAL FARMING (AT THE PRECIOUS HEART OF THE CITY) A GREENER AND ALTERNATIVE WAY TO PRODUCE FOOD? NOW, AFTER TRIALS AND ERRORS, THE IDEA IS ABOUT TO BE PROVEN. | URBAN 360º by Pablo Sánchez Chillón “An indoor farmer doesn’t pray for rain”. Several studies confirm that, by the year 2050, nearly 80% of the Earth’s population will reside in urban centers (today’s rate is up to 60%). Applying the most conservative estimates to current demographic trends, the human population will increase by about 3 billion people during that period, posing new challenges to sustainability and development. An estimated 109 hectares of new land (about 20% more land than is represented by Brazil) will be needed to grow enough food to feed them, if traditional farming practices continue as they are practiced today. At present, throughout the world, over 80% of the land that is suitable for raising crops is in use (sources: FAO and NASA). Historically, some 15% of that has been laid waste by poor management practices. Furthermore, the additional land available for cultivation is unevenly distributed, and much of it is suitable for growing only a few crops. The topic is not new. For further reading:

Non-Hybrid Seeds | Non-Hybrid Vegetable Fruit Grain Herb Seeds

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