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Reading (General)

Reading (General)

MES: Games, Free Printables MES English Certificate Templates Printable Cards Phonics Worksheets Worksheet Makers ESL Listening End User License Agreement: You are free to download any resource from this site as an end user and MES-English.com grants you an End User License with the following restrictions: You may not redistribute, copy, modify, transfer, transmit, repackage, charge for or sell any of the materials from this site. You may use photocopies or printouts for distribution to your students. MES reserves the right to terminate or make changes to this agreement for any reason and without notice. Copyright © 2005 - 2020 MES English | restrictions | privacy | about | contact 103 Things to Do Before/During/After Reading Pantomime Act out a scene you choose or the class calls out to you while up there. Dramatic monologue Create a monologue for a character in a scene. What are they thinking/feeling at that moment?

Interactive Whiteboard Activities During Reading | Teaching Literacy in the Early Years Posted by Miss Kelly Jordan on Sunday, June 19th 2011 I first got an interactive whiteboard in my classroom in 2008. I was teaching Prep at the time and it was a steep learning curve to discover how I could best use it to engage my students and improve learning outcomes. Fast forward three years and I am teaching Grade Two in an open classroom with Kathleen Morris. I love the enormous range of interactive websites and tools available for my students, and while I could manage to teach without an IWB, I wouldn’t want to! We use the IWB during our twenty minute blogging session every day, and it is often used for our CAFE reading strategy too. Below are just a few of the games our students have used this year. Read Write Think (Construct a Word) – This was used by some of our weaker readers, who were focussing on using beginning and ending sounds in words when reading. Wall of Words – This game focuses on sequencing sentences correctly and adding correct punctuation.

ELT stories | Tea time! ELT Blog.net | by Anthony Ash Inference Riddle Game by Phil and David Tulga Inference Riddles- having fun with inference and prediction - Welcome to my page on inference riddles. It includes my free Inference Riddle Game that you can play right now on your computer. You will also find information on my expanded activity featuring 101 Inference Riddles . If you already have access to the expanded activity, please click here! Inference Riddle Game 101 Inference Riddles Phil and his son, David, have developed an expanded version of their popular Inference Riddle Game. Riddles are an excellent way to practice interpreting figurative language, idioms, and homographs. In the “101 Inference Riddles” activity, your students progress through a graduated sequence of riddles, with riddle #1 being the easiest, and riddle #101 being the most difficult. “101 Inference Riddles” is a web-based application that is available to use on your computer, smartphone or mobile device. To purchase access to the “101 Inference Riddles” web activity, click the “Buy Now” button below. Home

“FluencyTutor” Could Be A Useful Tool For Students To See Their Reading Progress Richard Byrne posted yesterday about an intriguing new site that would be useful for emerging readers and English Language Learners called FluencyTutor For Google. It’s a web app only usable with a Chrome browser that provides a large selection of leveled reading passages that students can read, record, and store on Google Drive. Teachers can then listen at their convenience and correct and note students’ reading fluency. The reading passages provide quite a few supportive features that make them particularly accessible to English Language Learners. Most of the features are free, but teachers have to pay $99 per year for some “dashboard” services like tracking student progress. If I was teaching an online class of motivated adult English Language Learners, I could see FluencyTutor’s whole package as an excellent tool. However, I definitely wouldn’t recommend a classroom teacher using it as a way to track a readers’ progress.

Reflections of an English Language Teacher | Lizzie Pinard's take on teaching and learning Write A Letter To A Disney Character And Get A Postcard In Return Welcome to Couponing to Disney where I teach you how to find money in your family's budget to pay for things you thought were out of your reach (like a trip to Disney!). If you're new here, or you just want to keep up with all the latest posts, be sure to sign up for my FREE daily email newsletter (it contains all the hottest deals and advice from the past 24 hours). Thanks for visiting! Disney World will send you an autographed postcard when you write a letter to the following address: Walt Disney World Communications P.O. Box 10040 Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830-0040 Disneyland will send you an autographed postcard when you write a letter to the following address: Walt Disney Company Attn: Fan Mail Department 500 South Buena Vista Street Burbank, CA 91521 The picture will arrive with 4-6 weeks. Letter Writing Tips & Ideas You can write repeated letters to each address.If you have multiple children, they can each write letters. Be sure to email me when your latest picture arrives!

11 Alternatives to "Round Robin" (and "Popcorn") Reading Round Robin Reading (RRR) has been a classroom staple for over 200 years and an activity that over half of K-8 teachers report using in one of its many forms, such as Popcorn Reading. RRR's popularity endures, despite overwhelming criticism that the practice is ineffective for its stated purpose: enhancing fluency, word decoding, and comprehension. Cecile Somme echoes that perspective in Popcorn Reading: The Need to Encourage Reflective Practice: "Popcorn reading is one of the sure-fire ways to get kids who are already hesitant about reading to really hate reading." Facts About Round Robin Reading In RRR, students read orally from a common text, one child after another, while the rest of the class follows along in their copies of the text. Popcorn Reading: A student reads orally for a time, and then calls out "popcorn" before selecting another student in class to read. Why all the harshitude? Stigmatizes poor readers. 11 Better Approaches 1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Video Lesson: Mr. Bean Follow me on twitter This is a video lesson based around the video “Mr. Bean packs his suitcase” thanks to British Council for bringing it to my attention in their lesson plan on making predictions but I’ve adapted it for use in different ways with different levels. Kids and lower levels The aim of this lesson plan is to practice holiday vocabulary (clothes and items that go in a suitcase) and some basic grammar structure. Project a picture of a suitcase on to the board (or draw one) and ask “What do you put in your suitcase when you go on holiday?” toothbrushtoothpasteswimming shorts/trunkstowelunderpantscan of baked beanscloth/flannelsoapbooksuitcasetrousersshortsshoesteddy bearscissors You could also use this quizlet set to go over clothes vocabulary. If children are old enough to write, put them in pairs and hand out post-it-notes and a pencil to each pair. Mr. in his suitcase. Then stick all the post-its on the board and show the video. Higher levels – video dictations Objects: Verbs:

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