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YAY MATH! Algebra Geometry Math Videos Online

YAY MATH! Algebra Geometry Math Videos Online

Free fraction videos online Enjoy free online math videos on these fraction topics: (Fraction videos, part 2, are on this page.) The videos are recorded in high-density (HD) and are viewable both here as well as at my Youtube channel. These videos are usable for students, teachers, and parents. You can use them... To learn these topics yourself (if you're a student for example, or an adult needing a refresher)As lesson plans for teaching these topics. The videos match the lessons in my book Math Mammoth Fractions 1 (Blue Series book), or the lessons in chapter 5 of Grade 5-B (Light Blue series). Mixed numbers to fractions and vice versa I explain both the visual models and the shortcuts for converting mixed numbers to fractions or fractions to mixed numbers. To convert a mixed number to a fraction, divide the whole "pies" into pieces (the same kind of pieces as what the fractional part indicates), then figure out how many pieces you have. Adding and Subtracting Like Fractions Equivalent fractions - split the pieces!

Algebra Skip Discover Education Main Navigation Explore the Science of Everyday Life Click here for K-12 lesson plans, family activities, virtual labs and more! Home Math for Everyone General Math K-8 Math Algebra Plots & Geometry Trig. & Calculus Other Stuff Algebra Quick! Help typing in your math problems Home | Contact Us | About WebMath | Why WebMath | Website Map | Math Homework Help © 2013 WebMath.com Terms of Use Privacy Policy Contact Us About Us Check Requirements Download Adobe Reader Online Closed Captioning Careers @ Discovery Education What We Offer Who We Are Free Teacher Resources Free Parent Resources Free Student Resources Copyright © 2017 Discovery Education.

s Guide Interactive Math Resources Interactive Math Websites, Math Websites for Interactive Whiteboards Interactive Math Websites for Interactive Whiteboards Manipulatives National Library of Virtual Manipulatives Virtual manipulatives related to the NCTM standards. Big Online Calculator Use to teach students how to use a calculator. eManipulatives Base ten blocks, counters, number lines, etc... Interactivate Lots of resources for math lessons. Numbers Wash Line Put numbers in the correct order. Number Recognition Launch the Spaceship Students must click on the correct number to launch a spaceship/ Number Sequence Students pick the correct number to complete a sequence. Two Digit Numbers Students match names of two digit numbers. Numberlines Students guess patterns on the numberline. Odd or Even Students sort numbers as odd or even. Number Track Place numbers in correct order. Caterpillar Ordering and Sequencing Students put number in the correct order to put a caterpillar back together. Spooky Sequences Count by 2, 5, 10 Addition

History of the world World population[1] from 10,000 BCE to 2,000 CE. The vertical (population) scale is logarithmic. The history of the world is the history of humanity, beginning with the Paleolithic Era. Distinct from the history of the Earth (which includes early geologic history and prehuman biological eras), world history comprises the study of archaeological and written records, from ancient times on. Ancient recorded history begins with the invention of writing.[2][3] However, the roots of civilization reach back to the period before the invention of writing. Prehistory begins in the Paleolithic Era, or "Early Stone Age," which is followed by the Neolithic Era, or New Stone Age, and the Agricultural Revolution (between 8000 and 5000 BCE) in the Fertile Crescent. Outside the Old World, including ancient China[27] and ancient India, historical timelines unfolded differently. Prehistory[edit] Early humans[edit] Rise of civilization[edit] Ancient history[edit] Timeline[edit] Cradles of civilization[edit]

Dimensions Home A film for a wide audience! Nine chapters, two hours of maths, that take you gradually up to the fourth dimension. Mathematical vertigo guaranteed! Click on the image on the left to watch the trailer ! Free download and you can watch the films online! The film can also be ordered as a DVD. This film is being distributed under a Creative Commons license. Now with even more languages for the commentary and subtitles: Commentary in Arabic, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Spanish and Russian. Film produced by: Jos Leys (Graphics and animations) Étienne Ghys (Scenario and mathematics) Aurélien Alvarez (Realisation and post-production)

10 ways to improve your observation skills (and your career), part III | Fast Track Tools by Ken Revenaugh How did you do on the observation test? If you found your observation skills lacking, it may be something to consider working on, as… For people who plan to become the leaders of tomorrow, developing a keen sense of observation is a must. The crux of the technique lies in simply keeping your eyes and ears open at all times and never failing to register what you see or hear. Some great habits that can help you build your observation skills are: Trying to look at every day life in a clear manner. Andrew Cox suggests these ten behaviors and habits of thought critical for developing accurate observation skills: Sizing up people – people watching Clarity – seeing the world as it is Curiosity – asking why Listening skills Willingness to set aside personal biases Willingness to seek the inputs of others Seeking out new experiences and possibilities Being comfortable with ambiguity Knowledge of the behaviors and attitudes of people

Lesson Plans at FREE --Federal Resources for Educational Excellence FREE Features These features originally appeared on the FREE.ED.gov features blog. The features highlight resources and ideas related to holidays, awareness months, anniversaries and seasonal topics. January February March April May June July August Back to School: 7 Ways to Help Kids Transition Back to the Classroom September October November December About FREE Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE) offered a way to find digital teaching and learning resources created and maintained by the federal government and public and private organizations. FREE was conceived in 1997 by a federal working group in response to a memo from the President. Technology has made it increasingly easier to find information from government agencies or with custom search tools, like Kids.gov. FREE Disclaimer The U.S.

Learn to Remember Everything: The Memory Palace Technique I'm working on an ebook about memory techniques. If you are interested in knowing when it is ready, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter! In this post I'll teach you how to have perfect recall of lists of items. Length is not much of an issue, it can be your shopping list if 10 items or it can be a list with 50, 100 or even 1000. And in a forthcoming post I'll show you how you how to apply this technique to learning new languages. The technique we'll be learning is called the memory palace, and is also known as the method of loci (for the latin word locus meaning place) and also the mind palace. The memory palace The memory palace technique began in the 5th century B.C., when Simonides of Ceos, poet, was attending an unfortunate banquet in Thessalia. Think about it: It is not hard to remember who sits beside the host, where your friends sit, who is beside them and so on. The memory palace is well suited to how our brains have evolved. Your first memory palace: building and filling

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