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SOLO taxonomy

SOLO taxonomy
I am pleased to say that John Biggs himself has endorsed this representation of his ideas; "I've just found your website on SOLO et al. via google. I'm delighted! Your diagrams of prestructural-extended abstract are very elegant..." (Unsolicited email, 29 May 2005) The SOLO taxonomy stands for: Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes It describes level of increasing complexity in a student's understanding of a subject, through five stages, and it is claimed to be applicable to any subject area. I confess to a slight distrust of this kind of "progressive" model, which aspires inexorably to a final state. However, the emerging field of work on Threshold Concepts and Troublesome Knowledge links in very effectively with the SOLO taxonomy and offers some points about how the above issues might be addressed. There is a small but enthusiastic group of teachers using the SOLO taxonomy to structure their teaching in schools, and blogging about it. Related:  Solo Taxonomy

SOLO Taxonomy SOLO Taxonomy (structure of observed learning outcomes) provides a simple, reliable and robust model for three levels of understanding – surface deep and conceptual (Biggs and Collis 1982). At the prestructural level of understanding, the task is inappropriately attacked, and the student has missed the point or needs help to start. The next two levels, unistructural and multistructural are associated with bringing in information (surface understanding). At the unistructural level, one aspect of the task is picked up, and student understanding is disconnected and limited. The jump to the multistructural level is quantitative. HookED uses a unique classroom based approach to SOLO Taxonomy. This approach has been endorsed by Professor John Biggs who has been very supportive of the work and outcomes in New Zealand schools by Hooked on Thinking and more recently HookED. ” …very interesting and a new direction for SOLO as far as I know. What am I learning? 1. SOLO is used to: References:

Study Vibe - How to study - study skills for primary and high school students SOLO Taxonomy | John Biggs click to view a bigger version As learning progresses it becomes more complex. SOLO, which stands for the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome, is a means of classifying learning outcomes in terms of their complexity, enabling us to assess students’ work in terms of its quality not of how many bits of this and of that they have got right. SOLO can be used not only in assessment, but in designing the curriculum in terms of the learning outcomes intended, which is helpful in implementing constructive alignment. SOLO was first described by Kevin Collis and myself in Evaluating the Quality of Learning: The SOLO Taxonomy (New York: Academic Press, 1982, now out of print, but available in Chinese).

Top 12 Ways to Increase Student Participation Call it "active learning," or "classroom participation" -- every teacher wants to know how to motivate students to particpate, and how to nurture more involved students and fewer apathetic ones. With a little extra planning, that is possible. Below are four common reasons students don’t participate and techniques to solve those problems and spice up your lessons. Problem: The content is repetitive. Maybe it needs to be repetitive because the students don’t really “get it,” or maybe you’re reviewing for a test. Solution #1: Assess their prior knowledge. This could be as simple as asking students, “What do you know about (topic)?” Technology in the classroom tools that keep parents informed about classroom... To kick off this holiday week, we want to spread a little Thanksgiving joy with... Teaching strategies to help guide your students through a writer’s workshop... Exciting ways to use video conferencing in your classroom. Fed up with building pilgrim hats out of paper bags?

SOLO Taxonomy: giving students a sense of progress in learning Without a sense of progress you cannot be creative, so what language can we offer students that enables them to take control of understanding where they are in their learning? One key notion about creativity is that the ability to calculate progress is an important part of the creative process: knowing when something feels 'done'. Knowing when you're stuck, when you're done, when you're at the end of that chunk of learning is essential. It gives that indication that you need to go back out and get some more insights from someone or something. Knowing where you are in your learning requires a language, a rubric of some sort, and one which fits the bill really well is John Biggs' SOLO Taxonomy (Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes). The SOLO Taxonomy is like a stepping stone progression through the perceived understanding of a given area. The model provides five levels of understanding of a given topic or area of learning: Additional links (14/08/12):

Memory Improvement Techniques - Improve Your Memory with MindToo © VeerPRZEMYSLAW PRZYBYLSKI Use these techniques to improve your memory. The tools in this section help you to improve your memory. They help you both to remember facts accurately and to remember the structure of information. The tools are split into two sections. As with other mind tools, the more practice you give yourself with these techniques, the more effectively you will use them. Mnemonics 'Mnemonic' is another word for memory tool. The idea behind using mnemonics is to encode difficult-to-remember information in a way that is much easier to remember. Our brains evolved to code and interpret complex stimuli such as images, colors, structures, sounds, smells, tastes, touch, positions, emotions and language. Unfortunately, a lot of the information we have to remember in modern life is presented differently – as words printed on a page. This section of Mind Tools shows you how to use all the memory resources available to you to remember information in a highly efficient way.

SOLO Taxonomy The Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes Taxonomy (SOLO) is a notion that describes the stages of learning that students go through to reach a real depth of understanding on a topic. It outlines the journey from surface to deep learning. SOLO is John Hattie’s taxonomy of choice and is currently being studied in depth at his Visible Learning Labs (Osiris Educational Outstanding Teaching Conference, 2014). It is seen by Hattie and other academics as having many advantages over other taxonomies, in particular that of Benjamin Bloom. The SOLO Taxonomy emerged from in-classroom research whereas Bloom’s Taxonomy was theorised from a proposal by a committee of educatorsSOLO is a taxonomy about teaching and learning vs Bloom’s which is about knowledgeSOLO is based on progressively more challenging levels of cognitive complexity. Image via pamhook.com. SOLO works by students progressing from surface learning to deep. Pre-structural- The student has no understanding of the task.

Making Study Plan, Study Schedule A very well-known saying is, “He who fails to plan, he plans to fail”. Planning is very much important, if you want to be a successful student. A schedule helps you in utilizing your time more productively. It helps you to complete your course in a particular time. It tells you how much part of your course should be studied weekly or monthly so that you can complete your course before the exam. A schedule is made on weekly or monthly or daily basis. Count the number of subjects included in your course. Example. • Book-1 = 15 chapters = 185 topics • Book-2 = 20 chapters = 200 topics • Book-3 = 13 chapters = 145 topics • Book-4 = 16 chapters = 190 topics His entire course comprises of 185+200+145+190 = 720 Topics He has 6 month for preparation or 30x6 = 180 Days Divide total topics by total days you have for preparation, 720 topics/180 days = 4 topic/per day. After this calculation he shall make a table (having rows and column) on paper with the help of ruler and pen.

SOLO Taxonomy - Onehunga Primary School The SOLO taxonomy is used throughout our school to help children extend their learning through the use of thinking maps. SOLO maps enhance thinking skills that extend children beyond their current experiences. The children learn to understand and use this language and this sets them on a path for lifelong skills in learning. SOLO is divided into a number of levels of learning: Prestructural where a child needs support in expressing an idea on the topic. Here is an example of a statement at the multi-structural level written by a Year 2 child – this statement was written after the child had completed a 'describe' map. 'Ladybugs are insects and they are a kind of beetle. At this level children are able to give two or more ideas about a topic, and the ideas are not linked. A relational level statement results when children are able to compare, contrast, classify, sequence and analyse. 'In NZ the flag is blue, red and white whereas the Tongan flag is red and white.

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