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Scene-Creation Workshop — Writing Scenes that Move Your Story Forward

Scene-Creation Workshop — Writing Scenes that Move Your Story Forward
As the atom is the smallest discrete unit of matter, so the scene is the smallest discrete unit in fiction; it is the smallest bit of fiction that contains the essential elements of story. You don’t build a story or a book of words and sentences and paragraphs — you build it of scenes, one piled on top of the next, each changing something that came before, all of them moving the story inexorably and relentlessly forward. You can, of course, break the scene up into its component pieces — words, sentences, and paragraphs — but only the scene contains the vital wholeness that makes it, like an atom of gold, a building block of your fiction. It contains the single element that gives your story life, movement, and excitement. Without this one element, you don’t have a scene, you merely have a vignette. So what is this magical element that gives your scene its life and makes it the brick with which you build your fiction? Change. When is a scene a scene? Okay. Now it’s your turn. Okay. Back?

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7 Essential Elements of Scene + Scene Structure Exercise Today’s post is excerpted from The Plot Whisperer Workbook (Adams Media, 2012) by Martha Alderson. Two lucky commenters were chosen to receive a free copy of the book: Tanette Smith and Mindy Halleck. Congratulations! In a scene, a character acts and reacts to people, places, and events. Dark Treasury: World Building World Building is fun. It can also be a nightmare. How can one person possibly create an entire world? There's just so much to consider. If you miss something, your world may not feel real to your readers then, your story fails. Hopefully, the links below will make the process a little easier. Five Open Source Apps For Writers and Authors by Lisa Hoover - Jul. 17, 2009Comments (9) Even if you have the perfect idea for the next Great American Novel, getting it down on paper is never easy. While you could always use standard word processors like OpenOffice Write or AbiWord, they don't have the bells and whistles that make writing books, manuals, and theses as easy as possible. Fortunately, there are a few open source applications that help budding authors get stories out of their heads and into the hands of readers.

Writing a Multiple Viewpoint Novel Let's start with the basics... A multiple viewpoint novel is one in which two or more members of your cast list are viewpoint characters – that is, those characters through whose eyes we witness the events of the novel and whose thoughts and feelings we have direct access to. Or to put it even more simply... If different chapters are narrated by different characters – chapter one from John's point of view, chapter two from Helen's – you're writing a multi-viewpoint novel. Multiple viewpoints are common in novels, so it would hardly be a risky choice if you chose to write one yourself. Before you can decide, though, you need to understand...

102 Resources for Fiction Writing « Here to Create UPDATE 1/10: Dead links removed, new links added, as well as Revision and Tools and Software sections. Are you still stuck for ideas for National Novel Writing Month? Or are you working on a novel at a more leisurely pace? Using Effective Diction "The difference between the almost-right word and the right word is really a large matter—it’s the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning." —Mark Twain Writing teachers often tell their students to "show--don't tell." To make your writing effective, "show" something to readers that they can imaginatively experience; don't just "tell" readers an abstract idea. Notice, for example, the two sentences below, both conveying the same basic idea. (The second sentence is from Craig B.

A quick overview of the Hero’s Journey Planning out a novel? Be sure to join my newsletter for a FREE plotting/revision roadmap, and check out the full series on plotting novels in a free PDF! Over the last two weeks, we’ve looked at two plotting methods. One helped us parse our story into parts, the other helped us grow it from an idea. But a weakness of both is that neither really tells us what kind of events we need in a story—especially in the sagging middle. The Hero’s Journey is based on the universal archetype work of Carl Jung, as applied by Joseph Campbell.

The Complete Guide to Interior Monologue Interior monologue is the fancy literary term for a character's thoughts in a novel. In real life, the stream of thoughts we all have running through our heads at any given moment is more often referred to as internal monologue, though the two terms mean precisely the same thing. While we are dealing with definitions, a couple of closely-related literary terms are... Stream of Consciousness. How to Make Readers Feel Emotion on January 30th, 2011 by Fiction Editor Beth Hill and last modified on February 8, 2011 I wrote an article on the importance of creating emotions in readers, but I’ve noticed that writers are looking for specifics on how to accomplish that. So, this article complements that first one, presents practical tips on how to stir the reader’s emotions. Readers like to be touched, moved, by story. They like to imagine themselves in worlds and situations that challenge them, that give them opportunity to do and be something other than what they do or are in their real lives.

9 Rules For Writing Dialogue Want to know the most important thing about writing dialogue in fiction? If it sounds like a conversation you'd hear in the real world, you've gone horribly wrong somewhere. Seriously. The next time you're on a crowded bus or sitting by yourself in a bustling restaurant, just listen to the two people closest to you talking. You'll hear them... 7 Things How I Met Your Mother Can Teach Us About Writing If you’re like us on the WD staff (okay, maybe just Brian and I—internet high five!), then you were enthralled, captivated, and head over heels in love with the television show How I Met Your Mother. For nine years, this legend- (wait for it) -dary sitcom was unlike anything else.

The Art of Descriptive Writing Why is descriptive writing so important in a novel? Because unlike movies, novels are not visual. When you watch a film, all of the "description" is done for you by a camera and a microphone.

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