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No-till Gardening

No-till Gardening
Gardeners traditionally dig, or turn over the top layer of soil before planting to get rid of weeds, and make it easier to use fertilizers and to plant crops. This also speeds up the decomposition of crop residue, weeds and other organic matter. Tilling the soil is often the most strenuous of a gardener’s tasks. A complex, symbiotic relationship exists between the soil surface and the underlying micro-organisms, however, which contributes to a natural, healthy soil structure. With ‘no-till’ gardening, once the bed is established the surface is never disturbed. Benefits of no-till gardening Promotes natural aeration and drainage. Worms and other soil life are important to healthy soil structure, their tunnels providing aeration and drainage, and their excretions bind together soil crumbs. Saves water. Thick layers of mulch allow water to pass through easily while shading the soil. Reduces or eliminates the need to weed. Saves time and energy. No-till gardening helps soil retain carbon. Related:  Homesteading Garden

5 Secrets To A ‘No-Work’ Garden It took over 20 years of gardening to realize that I didn’t have to work so hard to achieve a fruitful harvest. As the limitless energy of my youth gradually gave way to the physical realities of mid-life, the slow accretion of experience eventually led to an awareness that less work can result in greater crop yields. Inspired in part by Masanobu Fukuoka’s book, One Straw Revolution, my family experimented with gardening methods which could increase yields with less effort. Here are the strategies we used which enabled us to greatly increase our garden yield, while requiring less time and less work. 1. ‘No-till’ gardening is a series of methods in which the soil is never disturbed, thereby protecting the complex subsoil environment for the benefit of growing plants. With ‘no-till’ gardening, weeding is largely eliminated. By switching to ‘no-till’ methods, you won’t have to do the heavy tilling or shovel work which so many gardeners suffer through each spring. 2. 3. Displaces weeds. 4.

VERTICAL HERB GARDENS - gardening, planting, nature, garden, sustainable lifestyle, do-it-yourself, creative environmental options, craft, organics, gardening, planting, flower pots, reusing, old and vintage, nature, environmental news comments on 04/22 at 01:35 AM Oh wow, I like this too. on 04/22 at 12:56 PM Hey! I want to build one too! on 04/22 at 01:00 PM My question would be how to water it. on 04/22 at 01:02 PM Inside the house environment. on 04/29 at 12:33 PM Wow, that's pretty awesome (not really a word I use that often!). on 05/26 at 03:40 AM Idon't know if you can do vertical planting, but I am doing an art project in which I give out seeds of trees that survived the atomic bombing to the people of US and the world. on 05/28 at 01:14 PM Saw this article and it made me think of your post...

Homemade Hummingbird Nectar Recipe Attracting Wild Birds No need to buy the powdered Hummingbird Nectar mix from the store for this rewarding hobby. Instead, make your with this simple hummingbird nectar recipe. You only need water and white sugar – super simple and easy to make. Use the following proportion: 1 part regular white sugar to 4 parts water. Example: 1 cup sugar, 4 cups water 1. 2. 3. 4. Using a microwave works too. Nothing extra: There is no need to add anything extra to the mixture, i.e. coloring, honey, etc. Storing hummingbird nectar: I store all varieties of my wild bird (Orioles, Hummingbirds, Butterflies, etc) “juice” up to two weeks in the fridge, but generally need to make it more often than that. Tip: I use a Rubbermaid container or a clean milk carton, clearly marked, to store my hummingbird juice in the refrigerator. Discard: If the juice in the feeder(s) becomes cloudy, or mucky, empty, clean and refill. Cleaning: Make sure bird feeders are cleaned every few days to a week to prevent any ickies.

Vertical Gardening Ideas....Tube Planters - Gardening Gone Wild I was transformed into a lover and student of vertical gardening after seeing Patrick Blanc’s vertical wall designs years ago in a magazine. I’ve written about vertical gardening on GGW over the past few years. Since then, the field has continued to grow at a quick pace. The horticultural industry is focusing more and more on green roofs and vertical gardening, realizing that these two forms of gardening are not only environmentally beneficial but can help expand peoples’ horizons of how to create a garden when dealing with an unconventional space. In he 1980s, Pat McWhinney noticed that many rock and waterfall type projects were lacking plant life around the rock formations. Consequently, he created a unique plant system called Tube Planters. Tube planters are made of an industrial cloth: Patrick has them sown up by a seamstress into circular tubes and lengths of varying dimensions. Five tube planters secured to a latticed screen, ready to be planted.

10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests 10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests Please be sure to Join our email list and receive all our latest and best tutorials daily – free! Background photo – Yummifruitbat (Wikipedia) lic. under CC 2.5 We’ve been doing some research into plants that repel pests and have compiled a list of 10 plants that can be planted together with other plants as a simple form of insect control. The idea of selecting plants for insect control is not a new one – and is part of the overall subject of companion planting. As time passes by, it seems that more and more people are getting concerned (rightly!) Another of the ironies of the use of insecticides is that not only do they kill the “bad insects” (the ones that eat crops), but they also wipe out “good insects” – the ones that feed on the bad insects! Companion planting for insect control can work in two ways a) plants that deter the pests and b) plants that attract the “good insects” that eat the ones that harm the plants. Marigold Borage Carrots Dill Sage

August gardening tips: storing fruit, harvesting onions, sowing fall veggies | Big Blog Of Gardening ~ organic gardening and organic lawn care By Charlie Nardozzi, Horticulturist and Leonard Perry, University of Vermont Extension Horticulturist Sowing fall vegetables, storing summer fruits, and harvesting onions are some of the gardening activities for August. August harvest includes sweet corn, tomatoes, carrots, beans, scallions and herbs. August is the time to sow veggie seeds for a late summer or fall harvest: Lettuce, broccoli, beets, carrots, radishes, and other short-season crops. Shade lettuce, if possible, during late afternoon to keep young plants cooler, or grow them next to larger plants, such as tomatoes, that provide some shade. Freezing berries and other fruits Don’t let fresh fruits and berries go to waste. Onions and garlic drying in the sun Harvest onions Begin harvesting onions when about half to three quarters of the leaves have died back. Harvest sweet corn Harvest sweet corn early in the day for the best flavor. Begin to sow cover crops Let rose hips develop This article originally appeared on Perry’s Perennials

5 Easy To Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants As the outdoor season approaches, many homeowners and outdoor enthusiasts look for ways to control mosquitoes. With all the publicity about the West Nile virus, mosquito repelling products are gaining in popularity. But many commercial insect repellents contain from 5% to 25% DEET. There are concerns about the potential toxic effects of DEET, especially when used by children. Children who absorb high amounts of DEET through insect repellents have developed seizures, slurred speech, hypotension and bradycardia. There are new DEET-free mosquito repellents on the market today which offer some relief to those venturing outdoors in mosquito season. Here are five of the most effective mosquito repelling plants which are easy to grow in most regions of the US: 1. Citronella is the most common natural ingredient used in formulating mosquito repellents. Citronella is a perennial ‘clumping’ grass which grows to a height of 5 – 6 feet. 2. Horsemint leaves can be dried and used to make herbal tea.

Just in Time for Winter: How to Build Your Own Mini-Greenhouse | Living on GOOD Gardeners looking to extend the growing season into winter can do so with a cold frame. These handy mini-greenhouses trap heat and keeping cool-season veggies growing in spite of frosty weather. Cold frames are inexpensive to build and don't consume a lot of energy. They yield fresh, local vegetables when mediocre grocery store fodder is being shipped from afar. This modular cold frame design offers two frame options: single- and double-tier. The lid should be kept shut on cold days and propped open for ventilation on unseasonably warm days. WOOD SELECTION: Cedar is best. WOODCUTTING 1 — Each 10-foot, 1 x 12-inch board will yield one 60-inch front/back panel and one 40-inch side panel. 2 — For the two-angled side panels, choose the most flawless 40-inch side panel and mark a diagonal line lengthwise, from corner to corner. 3— Set the saw to a blade angle of 15 degrees and run the center of the blade down the inside of the outer edge of the upper back panel. Text by Wilder Quarterly.

Lasagna Gardening 101 There's no hard and fast rules about what to use for your layers, just so long as it's organic and doesn't contain any protein (fat, meat, or bone). Before I go any further, let me just say that the basics of making garden lasagnas are simple: Don't remove the sod or do any extra work, like removing weeds or rocks. Mark the area for your garden using a water hose or a long rope to get the desired shape. Cover the area you've marked with wet newspapers, overlapping the edges (5 or more sheets per layer). You need less loose material to plant in than you might think. First, we covered the area with lime, then laid whole sections of wet newspaper on top of the pine needles and covered the paper with peat moss. We pulled the layers apart and planted 31 tomato plants, four squash, six cucumber, four basil, two rosemary, four parsley, and twelve cosmos. Once the harvest was finished, I pulled the stems and disturbed the layers for the first time. Site and soil. Planting and harvest.

How To Grow An Organic Straw Bale Garden Easily This is actually the easy part! Once your bales are prepped and ready to go you can begin planting. I recommend planting fairly well established young plants. Before planting in the straw bales acclimate your plants be setting them outside on top of the bales during the day and bringing them in at night. Once you plant your garden you should soak your plants at the base of the plants very thoroughly. Every few weeks you will want to feed your plants. Weed your garden as needed, however you will find that very little weeding is required and when it is it is very easy since your plants are so high up off of the ground. That's it – easy, inexpensive, and a lot of fun!

Intensive Gardening: More Food: Less Space, Less Work Related Content Speak Out Against NAIS Tell the U.S. Whether you grow food on a spacious homestead or are digging into your first urban garden, ditching the plant-by-rows approach and instead adopting intensive gardening techniques can help you grow a more productive garden that’s also more efficient to manage. Comparing 2 Popular Intensive Gardening Methods Two gardening authors and their systems of intensive vegetable gardening have been highly influential in North America for more than 30 years. Bartholomew’s aim with square-foot gardening is a simple, foolproof system that anyone can master (no companion planting, no crop rotation and no soil preparation). Jeavons’ biointensive gardening system is based on developing fertile soil in permanent garden beds that you initially dig to a depth of 2 feet. 4 Principles of Intensive Gardening Despite such differing approaches, both sets of techniques deliver high-yielding food gardens thanks to four common features, all of which I recommend. 1.

Top 10 Most Dangerous Plants in the World 1. Most likely to eat a rat Giant Pitcher Plant: Nepenthes attenboroughii Discovered more than 5000 feet above sea level on Mount Victoria in the Philippines, the giant, carnivorous pitcher plant secretes a nectar-like substance to lure unsuspecting prey into a pool of enzymes and acid. 2. Castor Bean Plant: Ricinus communis Castor-bean plants can be purchased at just about any garden center, despite containing the deadly poison ricin. 3. Western Water Hemlock: Cicuta douglasii Deemed the most "violently toxic plant that grows in North America" by the USDA, the water hemlock contains the toxin cicutoxin, which wreaks havoc on the central nervous system, causing grand mal seizures--which include loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions--and eventually death, if ingested. 4. White snakeroot: Eupatorium rugosum Drinking milk from a cow that decided to chow down on white snakeroot could lead to deadly milk sickness, as was the case with Abraham Lincoln's mother Nancy Hanks. 5. 6.

How to Identify Poison Ivy - Infographic - Outdoor Information Resource Posted by Treks on Friday, August 24, 2012 · 7 Comments Use This Graphic for FREE on Your Site! You may use the infographic above on your website, however, the license we grant to you requires that you properly and correctly attribute the work to us with a link back to our website by using the following embed code. Embed Code <a href=" /> <img src=" alt="How to Identify Poison Ivy - Infographic" /></a> <br/> Infographic authored by <a href=" Treks In The Wild</a>. Infographic Thumbnail Treks In The Wild operates in beautiful Ontario, Canada. Come and join us for an adventure – experience life, experience the outdoors.

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