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Primary History - Indus Valley

Primary History - Indus Valley
Related:  Harrappan Civilization

History and Politics, Indus Valley Indus Valley Civilization. The earliest traces of civilization in the Indian subcontinent are to be found in places along, or close, to the Indus river. Excavations first conducted in 1921-22, in the ancient cities of Harappa and Mohenjodaro, both now in Pakistan, pointed to a highly complex civilization that first developed some 4,500-5,000 years ago, and subsequent archaeological and historical research has now furnished us with a more detailed picture of the Indus Valley Civilization and its inhabitants. The Indus Valley people were most likely Dravidians, who may have been pushed down into south India when the Aryans, with their more advanced military technology, commenced their migrations to India around 2,000 BCE. Some kind of centralized state, and certainly fairly extensive town planning, is suggested by the layout of the great cities of Harappa and Mohenjodaro. The Indus Valley civilization raises a great many, largely unresolved, questions. Back to Ancient India

Online screening: Journey To The End Of Coal A project powered by Klynt Editing & publishing app. Journey To The End Of Coal tells you the story of a sacrifice. A sacrifice millions of Chinese coal miners are making everyday, risking their lives and spoiling their land to satisfy their own country’s appetite for economic growth. Your journey begins in Datong which is located just a couple hours away West from Beijing. You travel from there all around the region and visit its major coal mines, from the “best” state-owned complex to the worst private coal plants. In and around the coal mines, you get the story first hand from the mingong, the rural migrants traveling their country looking for work. At your own pace and will, you meet them and learn more about how they live in this valley of death and pollution, sometimes even literally bumping into them as they leave their home for their night shift, in the frozen winter of Northern China. Ultimately, you might discover China forbidden mines in which happen most of the accidents.

Ancient Africa for Kids - Kingdom of Ghana The kingdom of Ghana lasted about 800 years, until the kingdom of Mali took over. The kingdom of Ghana was rich! Ancient Ghana is located in a different place than the modern country of Ghana in West Africa. The ancient kingdom of Ghana was a key part of the Trans-Sahara Trade Route. But even earlier than the trading that went on between east and west Africa, the kingdom of Ghana acted as guards for the traders from the north, and the traders from the south. Ghana charged a fee for their protection in gold and in salt and in other goods. The people in Ghana were very happy. They had plenty to eat. They were creative people. Their storytellers were called Griots. The people of Ghana were peace loving. Ghana was so good at protection and trade that the kingdoms to the north and south of Ghana, along with Ghana herself, became known as the Gold Coast.

Harappan Civilization Week 16: Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilization I. History of Rediscovery of the Indus Valley Civiliza- tion A. II. A. III. A. IV. A. 1. 9-m-wide N-S avenue 2. D. Questions for Film "Pakistan: Mound of the Dead" 1. Over the Top - A First World War Free Online Adventure Game Introduction Over the Top is an interactive adventure game that allows YOU to experience life in the trenches during the First World War. As a young Canadian soldier stationed somewhere along the Western Front in the late Fall of 1916, you will live through some of the excitement, despair, brutality and sheer horror of trench warfare. Over the Top is based on the real-life experiences of Canadians who lived and died in the trenches during the First World War. Part history and part adventure story, Over the Top is divided into sections. Throughout the story, you will come across many words and expressions that were quite common at the time. Your goal in Over the Top is the same as that of thousands of Canadians who served in the trenches during the First World War: merely to survive. So pick up your rifle, put on your helmet and get ready for a truly unique experience! *Flash Player version 6 required Best viewed at 800x600 resolution Low-Graphics Version Virtual Museum of Canada.

Primary History - Ancient Greeks Who were the ancient Greeks? Who were the ancient Greeks? Discover different ancient Greek cities and find out how they were ruled. How did the Olympic Games begin? Learn how the Olympic Games began over 2,700 years ago! What was it like to live in an ancient Greek family? What was everyday life like in ancient Greece? Who were the ancient Greek gods and heroes The Greeks believed in many gods and goddesses. The ancient Greeks at war Learn about ancient Greek soldiers, the Spartan soldier state and read about famous Greek battles. What do we know about ancient Greek culture? Find out what ancient Greek theatre was like and learn about different ancient Greek festivals and art How did the ancient Greeks change the world? What did the ancient Greeks do for us? 3 class clips We have a selection of great videos for use in the classroom Links BBC History for Kids

Early Civilization in the Indus Valley Aryans probably used the Khyber Pass to cross the mountains during their Indian invasion. Located in present day Pakistan, the pass is about 16 yards wide at its narrowest point. The phrase "early civilizations" usually conjures up images of Egypt and Mesopotamia, and their pyramids, mummies, and golden tombs. But in the 1920s, a huge discovery in South Asia proved that Egypt and Mesopotamia were not the only "early civilizations." In the vast Indus River plains (located in what is today Pakistan and western India), under layers of land and mounds of dirt, archaeologists discovered the remains of a 4,600 year-old city. A thriving, urban civilization had existed at the same time as Egyptian and Mesopotamian states — in an area twice each of their sizes. The people of this Indus Valley civilization did not build massive monuments like their contemporaries, nor did they bury riches among their dead in golden tombs. Copyright J.M. The Twin Cities Photo courtesy of Carolyn Brown Heinz

Primary History - Vikings Index ECONOMICS OF THE INDUS VALLEY CIVILIZATION How did this civilization make its living? Like the older civilizations proceeding Indus in Egypt and Mesopotamia, these ancient people farmed. The people of Indus prospered on the foundations of an agriculture based system of irrigation and fertility, maintained by silt-bearing floods (Hawkes 1973: 267). Wheat and six-row barley were grown, as were melon seeds, oil crops like sesame and mustard, and dates (petrified dates have been found in the excavation of the Valley). From every crop that a farmer grew, a large portion of it had to be paid into public granaries. It appears that the people of Indus did in fact hunt the abundant wildlife in their midst. Aside from the subsistence of agriculture and hunting, the Indus people supported themselves by trading goods. The Indus seaboard has been commended by anthropologists for its efforts of oversea commerce. Nearing the end of the Indus Valley Civilization, the cities began to wither and the strong economy slowly deteriorated. Khan, Omar

Study Sheds More Light on Collapse of Harappan Civilization | Archaeology Climate change, violence and disease played a key role in the collapse of the Harappan civilization more than 3,000 years ago, according to a new study. This is an artist’s reconstruction of the gateway and drain at the city of Harappa. Image credit: Chris Sloan. Harappan civilization, or the Indus Valley civilization, developed in the middle of the third millennium BC, at the same time as contemporaneous civilizations in Egypt and Mesopotamia. The city of Harappa and the city of Mohenjo-Daro – the greatest achievements of this culture – are well known for their impressive, organized layout. Recent excavations have demonstrated that the cities grew rapidly from 2200-1900 BC, when they were largely abandoned. “The collapse of the Indus Civilization and the reorganization of its human population has been controversial for a long time,” said Dr Robbins Schug of Appalachian State University, who is the lead author of the study appearing in the open-access journal PLoS ONE.

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