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Mobile Learning infokit / Home

Mobile Learning infokit / Home
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Kids and Mobile Phones What age is appropriate for a kid to have a mobile phone? That's something for you and your family to decide. Consider your child’s age, personality, and maturity, and your family's circumstances. Is your child responsible enough to follow rules set by you and the school? When you decide your children are ready for a mobile phone, teach them to think about safety and responsibility. Phones, Features, and Options Decide on options and features for your kid's phone. Your mobile phone company and the phone itself should give you some choices for privacy settings and child safety controls. Be smart about smart phones. Many phones offer web access and mobile apps. Get familiar with social mapping. Many mobile phones now have GPS technology installed: kids with these phones can pinpoint where their friends are — and be pinpointed by their friends. Develop Cell Phone Rules Explain what you expect. Talk to your kids about when and where it's appropriate to use their cell phones. Set an example.

5 Awesome Things You Can Do With an IPad and an LCD Projector netsmartz Click on the titles below to print age-appropriate activity cards. These activity cards are related to the online activities and easy to implement with few extra materials. Printable handouts are included. Parents may want to skim through the activities to get ideas for discussing Internet safety with their children. Primary (Ages 5-7) Bad Netiquette Stinks Students will learn the definition of netiquette and discuss the importance of having good manners online. Intermediate (Ages 8-10) Attitude Overdrive Students will watch the NSTeens video "Attitude Overdrive" and discuss what to do when they encounter "griefers" while playing games online.

Pho.to - online photo editor, fun effects and tools, free software Lesson Ideas These lesson plans were perhaps the most popular activity for last year's Digital Learning Day. The links provide a ready-made activity that you can use with your students on Digital Learning Day and beyond. You will see that each lesson includes a full lesson plan and a short video introduction from the Digital Learning Day teacher who submitted the lesson. If you plan to use a lesson on Digital Learning Day in your classroom or school, make sure to add this activity to our map. Visit the toolkits for more lesson plans, tools to use, and tips from teachers in specific areas! I Am Malala In this innovative lesson plan, students explore the power of social media in calling for change, while also improving their understanding of various cultures and social issues that impact other parts of the world. Video Introduction Lesson Plan Activity Rubric Inquiry-Based Research This great lesson has students practice online research skills by playing timed trivia games. Video Lesson Plan

The "Big Five" IT trends of the next half decade: Mobile, social, cloud, consumerization, and big data "Much or most of these topics are in back burner mode in many companies just now seeing the glimmerings of recovery from the downturn. Much has been written lately about the speed at which technology is reshaping the business landscape today. Except that's not quite phrasing it correctly. As a result, there's a rapidly expanding gap between what the technology world is executing on and what the enterprise can deliver. At the end of the day, businesses must be able to effectively serve the markets they cater to, and doing so means using the same channels and techniques as their trading partners and customers. A tectonic technology shift One only need look at what's on the mind of CIOs these days (60% believe they should be directly driving growth and productivity) versus what they're well known for delivering on. "Easy", highly mobile, and "social" are the mantras of this new generation of IT. But this is not a blame game. Where does technology and IT go from here? Key adoption insight

How to Help Students Create a Positive Digital Footprint Children today are more tech savvy than previous generations and have digital footprints from increasingly earlier ages. Many parents “share” their children online before they are even born, through pregnancy updates and sonograms. Some parents post status updates about their child’s milestones, grades, sports, and activities. According to online security firm AVG in a 2012 study, 81% of U.S. children have a digital footprint before age two. But how can we keep this online imprint positive? Importance of a positive digital footprint: It’s difficult for children to consider their long-term future, like a college acceptance or job opportunities, but as adults we know how vital a first online impression will be. Kids are creating a digital footprint if they are participating on social media. Whether you are a parent or an educator, here are 3 things to consider when teaching children to create a positive digital footprint: 1. 2. 3.

6 Best Practices for Universities Embracing Social Media The Digital Marketing Series is supported by HubSpot, an inbound marketing software company based in Cambridge, Mass., that makes a full platform of marketing software, including social media management tools. For universities, deciding to use social media is a no-brainer. The 18- to 24-year-old college student demographic is all over the social web, and its younger counterpart (the high school crowd) is equally immersed. Alumni, recent and far-removed, use social networks to engage and stay connected with the world. Community members, parents of students, potential donors, faculty and staff and other constituents are just a tweet or "like" away. With so many key populations embracing social media, universities almost have no choice but to integrate these platforms into their marketing and communications plans. [More from Mashable: 20+ Essential Resources for Improving Your SEO Skills] Already, many schools have leveraged social media in a big way. 1. Define your goals, as well. 2. 3. 4.

DIGITAL YOUTH RESEARCH | Kids' Informal Learning with Digital Media What do you want to know? Grand Valley started this week. And, as usual, I began my Introduction to Learning and Assessment course with a workshop called "A Piece of Me" (handout). This involves an activity that was introduced to me over 14 years ago during an Integrated Thematic Instruction class. Activity: Asking and Recording Questions I begin this portion by saying something like, "I reserve the right to decline answering any question. We then move on to the groups asking their questions. Reflection: Looking Back - Small Group Analysis From your list of questions, pick one that you think was an effective question. I end the workshop by getting some feedback from the participants. I follow this workshop up with a home workshop where they apply the same strategy of asking questions to reading the course syllabus (handout). Now it is your turn.

Be a Good Digital Citizen: Tips for Teens and Parents Kids are the creators. It’s all about participating; communicating; making music, images, and videos; and posting written content. And the content that’s there? Kids must be able to know whether it’s credible or not.Everything happens in front of a vast, invisible, and often anonymous audience. Once something is out there, it lasts for a long time. Everything leaves a digital footprint.Information cannot be controlled. With Power Comes Responsibility In the video above, Omaha teens express what they love about their digital lives -- as well as what they struggle with. Digital Citizenship Tips for Teens For teens, we offer five simple rules of digital citizenship to help them create a world they can be proud of -- and inspire others to do the same. Think before you post or text -- a bad reputation could be just a click away. What goes around comes around. Spread heart, not hurt. Give and get credit. Make this a world you want to live in. Digital Citizenship Tips for Parents and Teachers

Digital textbooks open a new chapter South Korea, one of the world's highest-rated education systems, aims to consolidate its position by digitising its entire curriculum. By 2015, it wants to be able to deliver all its curriculum materials in a digital form through computers. The information that would once have been in paper textbooks will be delivered on screen. South Korea's Minister of Education, Science and Technology, Ju-Ho Lee, said that his department was preparing a promotion strategy for "Smart Education", focusing on customised learning and teaching. The project, launched during the summer, will involve wireless networks in all schools to allow students to learn "whenever and wherever", as well as an education information system that can run in a variety of devices including PCs, laptops, tablets and internet-connected TVs. He said the government would support an open content market containing a variety of learning materials, aimed at keeping up quality while keeping down costs. Tech-friendly teenagers Teaching gap

Anatomy of a Lesson Page Whether you're new to Common Sense Media’s Digital Literacy and Citizenship curriculum or have been using it for years, this is a good time to refresh your knowledge of all that's offered within our lesson pages. There are a lot of new resources! What’s New: 1. Unit Assessments. 2. 3. Click on the image to enlarge it. Oldies but Goodies: 4. 5. 6. 7.

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