background preloader

The Character Interview as a Writing Tool

The Character Interview as a Writing Tool
When writing a novel it is important to know your characters, and it makes life easier to get to know them early in your writing. There may be things in your character's past that you will not write in your book, but will still influence how the story plays out. One way to glean this information is to interview your characters and ask them some questions about their childhood, events or people who made an impact on their lives and their present circumstances. Ask all your characters these questions and let them answer in first person. Free write what comes to mind without self-editing. You can add questions of your own.

http://donnacsmith.hubpages.com/hub/The-Character-Interview-as-a-Writing-Tool

Related:  creating charactersdianemarycowan3

Creating an Original Character By Maisha Foster-O'Neal You've heard the old maxim before... 'a character can make or break your story.' Okay, okay, so you want to write an interesting character. A Simple Novel Outline – 9 questions for 25 chapters « H.E. Roulo Just as every tree is different but still recognizably a tree, every story is different but contains elements that make it a story. By defining those before you begin you clarify the scope of your work, identify your themes, and create the story you meant to write. At Norwescon 2011 I sat in on a session called Outline Your Novel in 90-minutes led by Mark Teppo. I’ll give you the brief, readable, synthesized version. Answer 9 questions and create 25 chapter titles and you’re there.

Questions to Help in Creating Characters Creating the more complex round characters takes time -- time spent thinking about how your characters look, where they're from, and what motivates them, for instance. The questions below provide structure to this all-important thought process. While the reader will not need to know all the details, it's important that you do. The better you know your characters, the more realistic your story or novel will end up being. 1.

Creating a character profile When you get an idea for a short story or a novel you probably get the basic idea of the characters with it. But in order to build believable characters you need more than just a basic idea of them. You need to really them. How to Write a Character Sketch: Learning More About Your Characters’ Motivations and Personalities Regardless of the type of writing you are doing, knowing who your characters are and knowing them well will add greatly to your work. Understanding your characters’ personalities through a character sketch helps you to understand where they are coming from and what motivates them. This, in turn, helps you understand what drives all of the action in your work, and the clearer this is, the easier your audiences will be able to connect with your writing. But how do you go about writing a character sketch?

How to Create a Character by Holly Lisle All Rights Reserved No matter what sort of fiction you’re writing, you’re going to have to populate your story with characters, and a lot of them, if not all of them, you’re going to have to create from scratch. Unfortunately — or maybe fortunately — there is no Betty Crocker Instant Character-In-A-Can that you can mix with water and pop into the oven for twenty minutes. How to Organize and Develop Ideas for Your Novel What if you have so many ideas for your novel that the idea of an outline completely overwhelms you? It’s good writing practice to keep a notebook or paper close by so that you can jot down ideas for your story as they arise—but when the result is a growing pile of mismatched odds and ends, how do you organize those ideas into some sort of coherent outline that will guide your writing? Or, conversely, what if you have a central idea for your story, but are unsure of where to go from there? Believe it or not, I’ve found the key to getting started from both of these situations can lie in the same simple method of creating scene cards. Say you’re in the first camp, the overwhelmed-by-random-ideas one. To begin with the scene card method, you’ll start by taking out that notebook or file folder filled with little scraps of paper.

Perspectives — The Writer’s Craft In order to fully understand point of view in literature, we need to explore the different perspectives from which a story may be told. Bear in mind that the Perspective is the scene as viewed through the eyes/mind of the chosen character. The story, however, can be told from any one of several points-of-view regardless of the perspective chosen.

Related: