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Top 10 sites to help students check their facts

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Related:  COLLECTION: Media Literacy and Fake NewsCredibility Assessment ToolkitTruth or FictionFALSE/Misleading Information

Special Report: The Changing Face of Literacy There has never been a generation of young people more immersed in digital media than this one, many of whom learned to use a mobile device before they even started school. This special report examines how literacy instruction is changing in the digital age, from learning to sound out words in elementary school to grappling with “Macbeth” in high school. It finds that, while experts quibble over what it means to be digitally literate, they agree on one thing: even the youngest children should be learning literacy with a mix of print and digital texts. Is the digital revolution transforming literacy instruction in the nation’s schools?

Beers & Probst: Responsible Reading and Fake News By Kylene Beers & Robert Probst How do we teach kids across the grades to read responsibly? Close attention to an author’s words – the responsibility a reader shows to the text – implies and requires a responsibility to oneself as well as the words on the page. Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones.

Bias already exists in search engine results, and it’s only going to get worse The internet might seem like a level playing field, but it isn’t. Safiya Umoja Noble came face to face with that fact one day when she used Google’s search engine to look for subjects her nieces might find interesting. She entered the term “black girls” and came back with pages dominated by pornography. Noble, a USC Annenberg communications professor, was horrified but not surprised. Fake News: Recommendations - Media Literacy Clearinghouse If you read any news story about “fake news” in the past 18 months, you no doubt came across the phrase “media literacy.” From the various news stories and blog posts, I have compiled the following recommendations and advice. (NOTE: lesson plans, handouts and related videos are posted near the bottom of this list) Newest materials are posted last. Do you have suggestions for content that could be added here?

Fake news? Bias? How colleges teach students not to be duped Media literacy — some say media illiteracy — is having a moment. And professors are ready to respond. Advertisment 1 of 2 Gallery: Fake news? Bias? The End of Reality In a dank corner of the internet, it is possible to find actresses from Game of Thrones or Harry Potter engaged in all manner of sex acts. Or at least to the world the carnal figures look like those actresses, and the faces in the videos are indeed their own. Everything south of the neck, however, belongs to different women.

To Test Your Fake News Judgment, Play This Game : NPR Ed Fake news has been on Maggie Farley's mind further back than 2016 when President Trump brought the term into the vernacular. Farley, a veteran journalist, says we've had fake news forever and that "people have always been trying to manipulate information for their own ends," but she calls what we're seeing now "Fake news with a capital F." In other words, extreme in its ambition for financial gain or political power. "Before, the biggest concern was, 'Are people being confused by opinion; are people being tricked by spin?' s guide to fake news websites and what they peddle At first look, BostonTribune.com certainly seems a trustworthy source. So does KMT11.com. And ABCNews.com.co. Even 24wpn.com has an official ring to it.

Determining the real from the fake health news - Philly The American Dialect Society voted “fake news” its Word of the Year for 2017, saluting the phrase for its double meanings as “disinformation or falsehoods presented as real news” and “actual news that is claimed to be untrue.” Fake news of either kind is a problem in politics, to be sure. But misleading or erroneous medical news is potentially even worse.

'Fiction is outperforming reality': how YouTube's algorithm distorts truth It was one of January’s most viral videos. Logan Paul, a YouTube celebrity, stumbles across a dead man hanging from a tree. The 22-year-old, who is in a Japanese forest famous as a suicide spot, is visibly shocked, then amused. “Dude, his hands are purple,” he says, before turning to his friends and giggling.

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