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Cyberbullying Toolkit

Cyberbullying Toolkit
Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% A Free Cyberbullying Toolkit for Educators This free toolkit has the resources schools need to take an effective stand against cyberbullying. Rely on it to start your year off right. Every day, you see how cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture. We created this free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against cyberbullying.

http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/cyberbullying-toolkit

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netsmartz Click on the titles below to print age-appropriate activity cards. These activity cards are related to the online activities and easy to implement with few extra materials. Printable handouts are included. Parents may want to skim through the activities to get ideas for discussing Internet safety with their children. Primary (Ages 5-7) Bad Netiquette Stinks Students will learn the definition of netiquette and discuss the importance of having good manners online. Dispelling the Myths About 1:1 Environments In my last post, I shared what we learned last year during our 1:1 iPad and Google Apps for Education launches. In this post, I’d like to dispel myths about 1:1 environments. My assertions are not based on opinion, but on evidence directly observed in secondary classrooms at Burlington High School and from the students that traverse these halls daily. Our school launched 1,000-plus iPads last year, and we're starting our second year with the device in the hands of all students and teachers. Myth 1: The Digital Generation Needs Technology

do you know these smart learning strategies? Smart learning strategiesWhat’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know. To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. WITS Program Receives National Award The WITS Program received a national award from the Canadian Institute of Health Research Partnership, that was presented by Gov.-Gen. David Johnston Monday night in Ottawa. WITS is an acronym for an anti-bullying program that is presented to elementary school students across the country.

Kids and Mobile Phones What age is appropriate for a kid to have a mobile phone? That's something for you and your family to decide. Consider your child’s age, personality, and maturity, and your family's circumstances. Students and Parents Debrief on Their First Social Media Summer Program Excerpt of Knapp Elementary's summer school calendar, July 2012 Image credit: Joe Mazza Back in May, our team at Knapp Elementary was busy planning our annual summer reading program. Some of us had just participated in a parent-teacher chat via Twitter on maximizing opportunities to keep the learning going over the summer.

11 Sites and Apps Kids Are Heading to After Facebook Remember MySpace? Not so long ago, practically every teen in the world was on it –- and then many left for Facebook. Now, as Facebook's popularity among teens is starting to wane, you might be wondering what the new "it" social network is. But the days of a one-stop shop for all social networking needs are over. Instead, teens are dividing their attention between an array of apps and tools that let them write, share, video chat, and even shop for the latest trends. You don't need to know the ins and outs of every app and site that's "hot" right now (and frankly, if you did, they wouldn't be trendy anymore).

Teaching Children Not to Be Rude! Guest Blog Post by Julia Cook As a school counselor, I would often have kids come into my office and expect me to wave my magic counseling wand and solve their problems for them. A good counselor, a good teacher, a good parent gives the wand to the child and teaches her how to wave it herself!

Lesson Ideas These lesson plans were perhaps the most popular activity for last year's Digital Learning Day. The links provide a ready-made activity that you can use with your students on Digital Learning Day and beyond. You will see that each lesson includes a full lesson plan and a short video introduction from the Digital Learning Day teacher who submitted the lesson. If you plan to use a lesson on Digital Learning Day in your classroom or school, make sure to add this activity to our map. Teens, Social Media, and Privacy Overview Teens are sharing more information about themselves on social media sites than they have in the past, but they are also taking a variety of technical and non-technical steps to manage the privacy of that information. Despite taking these privacy-protective actions, teen social media users do not express a high level of concern about third-parties (such as businesses or advertisers) accessing their data; just 9% say they are “very” concerned. Interactive feature: Sharing Information on Social Media

Blended Learning: We Are All New Teachers The challenges facing a new teacher are clear: how to write a strong lesson plan, how to master the fine art of lesson delivery and how to keep kids engaged in a positive classroom environment are all high on the list. Add to that list the addition of mastering the use of technology tools to support instruction with students, and many a new teacher might go running for the hills! In all seriousness, though, the need for a new teacher to be able to learn the fine art of incorporating Web 2.0 tools to support instruction with students is critical if we are to stay the course of 21st Century instructional reforms. Not only that, the research is clear that strategies that combine the use of traditional face-to-face classroom methods with computer-mediated activities are here to stay. Enter the blended learning model.

Susan Sontag on Literature and Freedom by Maria Popova “Literature can train, and exercise, our ability to weep for those who are not us or ours.” “The humanities give us a chance to read across languages and cultural differences in order to understand the vast range of perspectives in and on this world,” philosopher Judith Butler proclaimed in her fantastic 2013 commencement address on the value of reading, adding, “How else can we imagine living together without this ability to see beyond where we are, to find ourselves linked with others we have never directly known, and to understand that, in some abiding and urgent sense, we share a world?”

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