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This is (not) psychology

This is (not) psychology
Related:  character & structurespsychology

How walking through a doorway increases forgetting Like information in a book, unfolding events are stored in human memory in successive chapters or episodes. One consequence is that information in the current episode is easier to recall than information in a previous episode. An obvious question then is how the mind divides experience up into these discrete episodes? Dozens of participants used computer keys to navigate through a virtual reality environment presented on a TV screen. The key finding is that memory performance was poorer after travelling through an open doorway, compared with covering the same distance within the same room. But what if this result was only found because of the simplistic virtual reality environment? Another interpretation of the findings is that they have nothing to do with the boundary effect of a doorway, but more to do with the memory enhancing effect of context (the basic idea being that we find it easier to recall memories in the context that we first stored them).

Personality Patterns Based upon the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) Everybody is curious about their personality, so psychology to the rescue! Our personality test is similar to the Myers Briggs (MBTI) and the Jung personality tests, and is based upon an open-source set of personality testing items. These items are based upon scientific research and will provide results typical of a five-factor model of personality. The five factors measured by this test are extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and intellect/imagination. Please remember that these are only personality traits or preferences -- they do not predetermine every action you prefer in every situation. This test consists of just 50 questions and takes about 7 minutes for most people to complete. First, let's get started with some basic demographic information about you... Reference: Goldberg, L.

Neural balls and strikes: Where categories live in the brain Public release date: 15-Jan-2012 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Robert Mitchumrobert.mitchum@uchospitals.edu 773-484-9890University of Chicago Medical Center Hundreds of times during a baseball game, the home plate umpire must instantaneously categorize a fast-moving pitch as a ball or a strike. While monkeys played a computer game in which they had to quickly determine the category of a moving visual stimulus, neural recordings revealed brain activity that encoded those categories. "This is as close as we've come to the source of these abstract signals" said David Freedman, PhD, assistant professor of neurobiology at the University of Chicago. Organizing the chaos of the surrounding world into categories is one of the brain's key functions. "The number of decisions we make per minute is remarkable," Freedman said. During the task, scientists recorded neural activity in PFC and LIP.

Neuroscience of free will Neuroscience of free will is the part of neurophilosophy that studies the interconnections between free will and neuroscience. As it has become possible to study the living brain, researchers have begun to watch decision making processes at work. Findings could carry implications for our sense of agency and for moral responsibility and the role of consciousness in general.[1][2][3] Relevant findings include the pioneering study by Benjamin Libet and its subsequent redesigns; these studies were able to detect activity related to a decision to move, and the activity appears to begin briefly before people become conscious of it.[4] Other studies try to predict activity before overt action occurs.[5] Taken together, these various findings show that at least some actions - like moving a finger - are initiated unconsciously at first, and enter consciousness afterward.[6] A monk meditates. Overview[edit] -Patrick Haggard[6] discussing an in-depth experiment by Itzhak Fried[13] Criticisms[edit]

Western University-led research debunks the IQ myth Public release date: 19-Dec-2012 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Jeff Renaudjrenaud9@uwo.ca 519-661-2111 x85165University of Western Ontario After conducting the largest online intelligence study on record, a Western University-led research team has concluded that the notion of measuring one's intelligence quotient or IQ by a singular, standardized test is highly misleading. The findings from the landmark study, which included more than 100,000 participants, were published today in the journal Neuron. Utilizing an online study open to anyone, anywhere in the world, the researchers asked respondents to complete 12 cognitive tests tapping memory, reasoning, attention and planning abilities, as well as a survey about their background and lifestyle habits. "The uptake was astonishing," says Owen, the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience and Imaging and senior investigator on the project. No one component, or IQ, explained everything. [ Print | E-mail

PsyArt: An Online Journal for the Psychological Study of the Arts The gestalt notion "figure-ground phenomenon" refers to the characteristic organization of perception into a figure that 'stands out' against an undifferentiated background. What is figural at any one moment depends on patterns of sensory stimulation and on the momentary interests of the perceiver. Figure-ground relationship is an important element of the way we organise reality in our awareness, including works of art. Poets may rely on our habitual figure-ground organisations in extra-linguistic reality to exploit our flexibility in shifting attention from one aspect to another so as to achieve certain poetic effects by inducing us to reverse the habitual figure-ground relationships. There was an old joke in Soviet Russia about a guard at the factory gate who at the end of every day saw a worker walking out with a wheelbarrow full of straw. figure-ground phenomenon. Look, for instance, at this "droodle," entitled "Four Ku Klux Klansmen looking down a well, seen from below."

Understanding the Eight Jungian Cognitive Processes / Eight Functions Attitudes Behavioral Science Unit | History of Forensic Psychology Q: What is the history of the Behavioral Science Unit? 1974: The Behavioral Science Unit (BSU) is created to investigate serial rape and homicide cases. There were originally eleven agents and it was a part of the Training Division. 1984: The Behavioral Science Unit split into the Behavioral Science Unit and the Behavioral Science Investigative Support Unit. The Behavioral Science Unit became primarily responsible for the training of FBI National Academy students in the variety of specialized topics concerning the behavior and social sciences, and the Behavioral Science Investigative Support Unit became primarily responsible for the investigation of criminals. 1994: The Critical Incident Response Group integrated the FBI’s crisis management, behavioral, and tactical resources within one entity. 1997: The program then evolved into the Behavioral Analysis Unit. Q: What is the Behavioral Science Unit? Q: Who makes up the unit? Q: What do they teach? Q: Who do they teach? References: Holden, H.

Psychological Studies | Links to hundreds of Psychology studies running on the internet | Online Psychology Research Ltd Théorie des intelligences multiples Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. La théorie des intelligences multiples suggère qu'il existe plusieurs types d'intelligence chez l'enfant d'âge scolaire et aussi, par extension, chez l'Homme. Cette théorie fut pour la première fois proposée par Howard Gardner en 1983. L'origine de la théorie[modifier | modifier le code] Lorsque Howard Gardner publia son livre Frames of Mind: the Theory of Multiple Intelligence en 1983, il introduisit une nouvelle façon de comprendre l'intelligence des enfants en échec scolaire aux États-Unis. Les diverses catégories d'intelligence pour Howard Gardner[modifier | modifier le code] L’intelligence logico-mathématique[modifier | modifier le code] Les personnes qui ont une intelligence logico-mathématique développée possèdent la capacité de calculer, de mesurer, de faire preuve de logique et de résoudre des problèmes mathématiques et scientifiques. L’intelligence spatiale[modifier | modifier le code] Notes et références[modifier | modifier le code]

Psychological sleuths--Criminal profiling: the reality behind the myth For 16 years, "mad bomber" George Metesky eluded New York City police. Metesky planted more than 30 small bombs around the city between 1940 and 1956, hitting movie theaters, phone booths and other public areas. In 1956, the frustrated investigators asked psychiatrist James Brussel, New York State's assistant commissioner of mental hygiene, to study crime scene photos and notes from the bomber. Brussel came up with a detailed description of the suspect: He would be unmarried, foreign, self-educated, in his 50s, living in Connecticut, paranoid and with a vendetta against Con Edison--the first bomb had targeted the power company's 67th street headquarters. While some of Brussel's predictions were simply common sense, others were based on psychological ideas. In the following decades, police in New York and elsewhere continued to consult psychologists and psychiatrists to develop profiles of particularly difficult-to-catch offenders. How does profiling work? Psychology's contributions

'Mind reading' brain scans reveal secrets of human vision Courtesy of Fei-Fei Li Researchers were able to determine that study participants were looking at this street scene even when the participants were only looking at the outline. Researchers call it mind reading. The researchers, however, can usually tell which photo the volunteer is watching at any given moment, aided by sophisticated software that interprets the signals coming from the scan. Now, psychologists and computer scientists at Stanford, Ohio State University and the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign have taken mind reading a step further, with potential impact on how both computers and the visually impaired make sense of the world they see. The researchers, including Stanford computer scientist Fei-Fei Li, removed almost all of the detail from the color photographs, leaving only sparse line drawings of the assorted scenes. The results demonstrate that outlines play a crucial role in how the human eye and mind interpret what is seen. Steve Taylor / Creative Commons

25 Acts of Body Language to Avoid Our body language exhibits far more information about how we feel than it is possible to articulate verbally. All of the physical gestures we make are subconsciously interpreted by others. This can work for or against us depending on the kind of body language we use. Some gestures project a very positive message, while others do nothing but set a negative tone. Most people are totally oblivious to their own body language, so the discipline of controlling these gestures can be quite challenging. Most of them are reflexive in nature, automatically matching up to what our minds are thinking at any given moment. Nevertheless, with the right information and a little practice, we can train ourselves to overcome most of our negative body language habits. Practice avoiding these 25 negative gestures: “ I speak two languages, Body and English. ” — Mae West Holding Objects in Front of Your Body – a coffee cup, notebook, hand bag, etc. Want to know powerful, dominant, confident body language postures?

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