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Musei Vaticani - vatican museum

Musei Vaticani - vatican museum

http://www.museivaticani.va/content/museivaticani/en.html

Related:  romeAncient EgyptMUSEESMusées italiens

Vatican Museums The Vatican Museums (Italian: Musei Vaticani) are the museums of the Vatican City and are located within the city's boundaries. They display works from the immense collection built up by the Roman Catholic Church throughout the centuries including some of the most renowned classical sculptures and most important masterpieces of Renaissance art in the world. Pope Julius II founded the museums in the early 16th century. The Sistine Chapel with its ceiling decorated by Michelangelo and the Stanze della Segnatura decorated by Raphael are on the visitor route through the Vatican Museums. They were visited by 4,310,083 people in the year 2007.[1] The Vatican Museums broke attendance records in 2011 with just over 5 million people.

Digital Karnak: Welcome The colossal site of Karnak is one of the largest temple complexes in the world, with an incredibly rich architectural, ritual, religious, economic, social and political history. The Amun-Ra precinct, which includes an astonishing number of individual temples, shrines and processional ways, stands as a micro-cosmos of ancient Egypt. We invite you to experience Karnak – to learn about an ancient site that still resonates today because of its monumental pylons, towering columns, stunning reliefs and architectural marvels.

Vatican Museums - Official web site The Friday evening openings of the Vatican Museums will be even more accessible to residents of Rome thanks to the renewed agreement with Atac. For the third consecutive year, Metrebus and èRoma cards holders, accompanied by one guest, may obtain a special reduced ticket at the price of 17.00 Euros, and enjoy preferential skip the line access (plus complimentary DVD, "Art and Faith, the Treasures of the Vatican", an evocative review in images of 2000 years of the history of the Church and art). The initiative, for which booking is not obligatory, is valid until 28 October 2016 – August not included – every Friday from 7 to 11 p.m. (last entry 9.30 p.m.).

Pliny the Elder For my part I deem those blessed to whom, by favour of the gods, it has been granted either to do what is worth writing of, or to write what is worth reading; above measure blessed those on whom both gifts have been conferred. In the latter number will be my uncle, by virtue of his own and of your compositions.[1] Pliny is referring to the fact that Tacitus relied on his uncle's now missing work on the History of the German Wars. Pliny the Elder died on August 25, AD 79, while attempting the rescue by ship of a friend and his family from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that had just destroyed the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

Index Click here to return to index of art historical sites. Click here to return to index of artists and architects. Click here to return to chronological index. Click here to see the home page of Bluffton College. Tampa Museum of Art The first artwork purchased by the Tampa Museum of Art was an ancient Greek vase—an Attic black-figure column krater bought in 1981 —and this has remained an important area of collecting for the Museum ever since. The Museum’s most notable acquisition of antiquities came five years later, in the form of the Joseph Veach Noble Collection, a significant private collection of over 150 objects amassed primarily in the 1950s and ‘60s. A collector and scholar interested in the techniques of ancient painted pottery, Mr. Noble had assembled a collection especially strong in the black- and red-figure pottery of Greece (particularly Athens and Attica) and South Italy, including numerous vases of interest for technical reasons as well as for their beauty and interesting iconography.

Trevi Fountain History before 1629[edit] Trevi Fountain in Rome, Italy Legends[edit] Legend holds that in 19 BC thirsty Roman soldiers were guided by a young girl to a source of pure water thirteen kilometers from the city of Rome. The discovery of the source led Augustus to commission the construction of a twenty-two kilometer aqueduct leading into the city, which was named Aqua Virgo, or Virgin Waters, in honor of the legendary young girl. The aqueduct served the hot Baths of Agrippa, and Rome, for over four hundred years.

Internet History Sourcebooks Internet Ancient History Sourcebook: Egypt See Main Page for a guide to all contents of all sections. General MEGA Abzu: Guide to Resources for the Study of the Ancient Near East Available on the Internet [Website] MEGA Egyptology Resources [Website-Cambridge] WEB History of Ancient Egypt Page [At Charleston] WEB Neferchichi's ClipArt [Website] Images of divinities, and much more. Maps Chronologies There are myriad competing "high, middle, and low" chronologies for Egyptian history. Book titles with full text online "The 1688 Paradise Lost and Dr. Aldrich": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 6 (1972) Boorsch, Suzanne (1972) 20th-Century Art: A Resource for Educators Paul, Stella (1999) List of tourist attractions in Rome The Colosseum, Rome's second and the world's 39th most popular tourist attraction, with 4 million tourists a year.[1] List[edit] Religious edifices[edit]

Music & Dance in Ancient Egypt Music and dance were highly valued in ancient Egyptian culture, but they were more important than is generally thought: they were integral to creation and communion with the gods and, further, were the human response to the gift of life and all the experiences of the human condition. Egyptologist Helen Strudwick notes how, "music was everywhere in Ancient Egypt - at civil or funerary banquets, religious processions, military parades and even at work in the field" (416). The Egyptians loved music and included scenes of musical performances in tomb paintings and on temple walls, but valued the dance equally and represented its importance as well. The goddess Hathor, who also imbued the world with joy, was associated most closely with music, but initially, it was another deity named Merit (also given as Meret). In some versions of the creation story, Merit is present with Ra or Atum along with Heka (god of magic) at the beginning of creation and helps establish order through music. 1.

Reading Room The Reading Room is a special corner of lacma.org dedicated to catalogues and brochures of exhibitions past. These are out-of-print, hard-to-find publications available here in full for free. From a unique set of publications focused on the Southern California art scene to rare books about German Expressionism, modern art, Southeast Asian art, and more, the catalogues and brochures here reflect the depth and breadth of LACMA’s collection and exhibition history. We continue to add new publications on an ongoing basis. Richard Brettell, Scott Schaefer, et al. Spanish Steps The Spanish Steps (Italian: Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti) are a set of steps in Rome, Italy, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top. The Scalinata is the widest staircase in Europe.[1] History[edit] Following a competition in 1717 the steps were designed by the little-known Francesco de Sanctis,[2] though Alessandro Specchi was long thought to have produced the winning entry. Generations of heated discussion over how the steep slope to the church on a shoulder of the Pincio should be urbanised preceded the final execution.

Cosmetics, Perfume, & Hygiene in Ancient Egypt For the ancient Egyptians life was a celebration, and so, just as one would want to look one's best at any party, personal hygiene was an important cultural value. The Egyptians bathed daily, shaved their heads to prevent lice or other problems, and regularly used cosmetics, perfumes, and breath mints. So important was one's personal appearance that some spells from The Egyptian Book of the Dead stipulate that one cannot speak them in the afterlife if one is not clean and presentable, and it is clear this means in a physical sense. Spell 125 prohibits one from speaking it unless one is "clean, dressed in fresh clothes, shod in white sandals, painted with eye-paint, anointed with the finest oil of myrrh." The gods are regularly depicted wearing eye make-up, as are the souls in the afterlife, and cosmetics are among the most common items placed in tombs as grave goods. Cosmetics were not only used to enhance personal appearance but also for one's health.

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