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Project-based learning

Project-based learning
Project-based learning (PBL) is considered an alternative to paper-based, rote memorization, teacher-led classrooms. Proponents of project-based learning cite numerous benefits to the implementation of these strategies in the classroom including a greater depth of understanding of concepts, broader knowledge base, improved communication and interpersonal/social skills, enhanced leadership skills, increased creativity, and improved writing skills. John Dewey initially promoted the idea of "learning by doing." John Dewey, 1902 Markham (2011) describes project-based learning (PBL) as: " PBL integrates knowing and doing. Students learn knowledge and elements of the core curriculum, but also apply what they know to solve authentic problems and produce results that matter. Project-based learning has been associated with the "situated learning" perspective of James G. Structure[edit] Elements[edit] Comprehensive Project-based Learning: Examples[edit] Roles[edit] PBL relies on learning groups.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project-based_learning

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Problem Based Learning Activities Constitution Day projects & Essays resources es/ms/hs Actively seek out alternative information ADA - assessment and action project Alternative Energy Sources and Conservation Attendance Improvement Campaign Benjamin Franklin Extraordinary Project-Based Engineering for Kids Fun, original, and exciting collection of project-based engineering lessons for kids. If you enjoy these projects, then I encourage you to buy my book, Rubber Band Engineer. It's a full-color-photo book full of more project plans that range from the surprisingly simple to the curiously complex, and some have their roots right here at Instructables. These project-based lessons focus on basic principles of physics, structural, and mechanical engineering.

Hybrid Course Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path or pace.[1] While still attending a “brick-and-mortar” school structure, face-to-face classroom methods are combined with computer-mediated activities.[2] Proponents of blending learning cite the opportunity for data collection and customization of instruction and assessment as two major benefits of this approach.[3] Schools with blended learning models may also choose to reallocate resources to boost student achievement outcomes.[4] Terminology[edit] History of the term[edit] The concept of blended learning has been around for a long time, but its terminology was not firmly established until around the beginning of the 21st century. Word usage and context[edit] Blended Learning History[edit]

The PBL Super Highway… Over 45 Links To Great Project Based Learning Welcome to another post that I know you will want to share and bookmark. As I travel the country I constantly have teachers ask me for places to find some engaging PBL ideas! Below you will find the collection of links I have started to assemble. Enjoy and please take a moment to subscribe by email or RSS and also give me a follow on Twitter at mjgormans. I promise you will find some great information coming your way this school year…so Sign Up Now and please pass this on with a retweet! – Mike Gorman (

Microbial Fuel Cells - A Way to Generate Clean Electricity from Water Lack of electricity in many less developed countries prompted us to perform this project to submit to the Google Science Fair. We created a microbial fuel cell (MFC) using easily accessible and cheap materials. The MFC utilized waste water and lactobacillus to create hydrogen peroxide, which when forced through a proton exchange membrane, created electricity cleanly and cheaply. The proton exchange membrane separated the hydrogen peroxide molecules and allowed only hydrogen ions to pass.

One to one computing In the context of education, one-to-one computing (sometimes abbreviated as "1:1") refers to academic institutions, such as schools or colleges, issuing each enrolled student an electronic device in order to access the Internet, digital course materials and digital textbooks. The concept has been actively explored and sporadically implemented since the late 1990s.[1] One-to-one computing is frequently contrasted with a policy of "bring your own device" (BYOD), which encourages or requires students to use their own laptops, smartphones or other electronic devices in class. One-to-one computing offers the benefits of equal access, standardization, easy upgrades, simple networking and the ability to monitor student progress and online behavior. For these reasons, one-to-one computing is a major part of education policy in many countries. However, one-to-one requires substantial institutional investment. Jump up ^ Bebel, Damian; Rachel Kay (2010).

A Better List Of Ideas For Project-Based Learning A Better List Of Ideas For Project-Based Learning At TeachThought, we’re huge fans of project-based learning. While there is no magic bullet of practice, program, or framework that automatically produces progressive and effective learning, what makes project-based learning exceptional is its flexibility. As it is, first and foremost, simply a curriculum planning tool, so much other “good stuff” that can support learning (game-based learning, learning simulations, place-based education, self-directed learning, etc.) can all be “embedded” in project-based learning.

Arachnosaurus - LabVIEW for Lego MINDSTORMS Projects Introduction to the Arachnosaurus project This project is designed to show you how to create linkages and walking mechanisms. The Arachnosaurus is based on Jansen linkage. Theo Jansen came up with these innovative "walking linkages" to allow his kinetic sculptures to come to life. You will also learn how to create while loops, case structures, and motor and touch sensor controls. Linkages are used to convert one type of motion into another.

Self-paced instruction Self-paced instruction is any kind of instruction that proceeds based on learner response. The content itself can be curriculum, corporate training, technical tutorials, or any other subject that does not require the immediate response of an instructor. Self-paced instruction is constructed in such a way that the learner proceeds from one topic or segment to the next at his/her own speed. This type of instruction is becoming increasingly popular as the education world shifts from the classroom to the internet.[1] See also[edit] References[edit]

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