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Wave–particle duality

Wave–particle duality
Origin of theory[edit] The idea of duality originated in a debate over the nature of light and matter that dates back to the 17th century, when Christiaan Huygens and Isaac Newton proposed competing theories of light: light was thought either to consist of waves (Huygens) or of particles (Newton). Through the work of Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Louis de Broglie, Arthur Compton, Niels Bohr, and many others, current scientific theory holds that all particles also have a wave nature (and vice versa).[2] This phenomenon has been verified not only for elementary particles, but also for compound particles like atoms and even molecules. For macroscopic particles, because of their extremely short wavelengths, wave properties usually cannot be detected.[3] Brief history of wave and particle viewpoints[edit] Thomas Young's sketch of two-slit diffraction of waves, 1803 Particle impacts make visible the interference pattern of waves. A quantum particle is represented by a wave packet. Related:  spacetime

Quantum tunnelling Quantum tunnelling or tunneling (see spelling differences) refers to the quantum mechanical phenomenon where a particle tunnels through a barrier that it classically could not surmount. This plays an essential role in several physical phenomena, such as the nuclear fusion that occurs in main sequence stars like the Sun.[1] It has important applications to modern devices such as the tunnel diode,[2] quantum computing, and the scanning tunnelling microscope. The effect was predicted in the early 20th century and its acceptance as a general physical phenomenon came mid-century.[3] Tunnelling is often explained using the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and the wave–particle duality of matter. Pure quantum mechanical concepts are central to the phenomenon, so quantum tunnelling is one of the novel implications of quantum mechanics. History[edit] After attending a seminar by Gamow, Max Born recognised the generality of tunnelling. Introduction to the concept[edit] The tunnelling problem[edit] or

Photon Nomenclature[edit] In 1900, Max Planck was working on black-body radiation and suggested that the energy in electromagnetic waves could only be released in "packets" of energy. In his 1901 article [4] in Annalen der Physik he called these packets "energy elements". The word quanta (singular quantum) was used even before 1900 to mean particles or amounts of different quantities, including electricity. Later, in 1905, Albert Einstein went further by suggesting that electromagnetic waves could only exist in these discrete wave-packets.[5] He called such a wave-packet the light quantum (German: das Lichtquant). The name photon derives from the Greek word for light, φῶς (transliterated phôs). Physical properties[edit] The cone shows possible values of wave 4-vector of a photon. A photon is massless,[Note 2] has no electric charge,[13] and is stable. Photons are emitted in many natural processes. Since p points in the direction of the photon's propagation, the magnitude of the momentum is

Uncertainty principle Introduced first in 1927, by the German physicist Werner Heisenberg, it states that the more precisely the position of some particle is determined, the less precisely its momentum can be known, and vice versa.[1] The formal inequality relating the standard deviation of position σx and the standard deviation of momentum σp was derived by Earle Hesse Kennard[2] later that year and by Hermann Weyl[3] in 1928: (ħ is the reduced Planck constant, h / 2π). Since the uncertainty principle is such a basic result in quantum mechanics, typical experiments in quantum mechanics routinely observe aspects of it. Certain experiments, however, may deliberately test a particular form of the uncertainty principle as part of their main research program. These include, for example, tests of number–phase uncertainty relations in superconducting[10] or quantum optics[11] systems. Introduction[edit] Click to see animation. The superposition of several plane waves to form a wave packet. (Ref [9]) . with yields . and

Complementarity (physics) In physics, complementarity is a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, closely associated with the Copenhagen interpretation. It holds that objects governed by quantum mechanics, when measured, give results that depend inherently upon the type of measuring device used, and must necessarily be described in classical mechanical terms. Further, a full description of a particular type of phenomenon can only be achieved through measurements made in each of the various possible bases — which are thus complementary. The complementarity principle was formulated by Niels Bohr, the developer of the Bohr model of the atom, and a leading founder of quantum mechanics.[1] Bohr summarized the principle as follows: ...however far the [quantum physical] phenomena transcend the scope of classical physical explanation, the account of all evidence must be expressed in classical terms. For example, the particle and wave aspects of physical objects are such complementary phenomena. Physicists F.A.M. Dr.

Everything is Connected | Cosmic Variance More recently, though, another excerpt from this lecture has been passed around, this one about ramifications of the Pauli Exclusion Principle. (Headline at io9: “Brian Cox explains the interconnectedness of the universe, explodes your brain.”) The problem is that, in this video, the proffered mind-bending consequences of quantum mechanics aren’t actually correct. Some people pointed this out, including Tom Swanson in a somewhat intemperately-worded blog post, to which I pointed in a tweet. Which led to some tiresome sniping on Twitter, which you can dig up if you’re really fascinated. Much more interesting to me is getting the physics right. One thing should be clear: getting the physics right isn’t easy. And finally, when one translates from the relative clarity of the equations to a natural-language description in order to reach a broad audience, it’s always possible to quibble about the best way to translate. Of course the answer is “none whatsoever.” Absolutely nothing.

Ionization Ionization (or ionisation, see American and British English spelling differences) is the process by which an atom or a molecule acquires a negative or positive charge by gaining or losing electrons. Ionization, often, results from the interaction of an atom or a molecule with an ionizing particle, including charged particles with sufficient energies and energetic photons. A rare case of ionization in the absence of an external particle is the internal conversion process, through which an excited nucleolus transfers its energy to one of the inner-shell electrons and ejects it with high kinetic energy. The ionization process is of particular interest in fundamental science. Ionization energy of atoms and the periodic table[edit] Figure 1. The trend in the ionization energy of atoms is often used to demonstrate the periodic behavior of atoms with respect to the atomic number, as summarized by ordering atoms in Mendeleev's table. Ionization to negatively charged ions[edit] is given by where .

Thermal radiation This diagram shows how the peak wavelength and total radiated amount vary with temperature according to Wien's displacement law. Although this plot shows relatively high temperatures, the same relationships hold true for any temperature down to absolute zero. Visible light is between 380 and 750 nm. Thermal radiation in visible light can be seen on this hot metalwork. Its emission in the infrared is invisible to the human eye and the camera the image was taken with, but an infrared camera could show it (See Thermography). Thermal radiation is electromagnetic radiation generated by the thermal motion of charged particles in matter. Examples of thermal radiation include the visible light and infrared light emitted by an incandescent light bulb, the infrared radiation emitted by animals and detectable with an infrared camera, and the cosmic microwave background radiation. Thermal radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms of heat transfer. Overview[edit] Surface effects[edit] Here,

Introduction to quantum mechanics Many aspects of quantum mechanics are counterintuitive[3] and can seem paradoxical, because they describe behavior quite different from that seen at larger length scales. In the words of quantum physicist Richard Feynman, quantum mechanics deals with "nature as She is – absurd".[4] For example, the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics means that the more closely one pins down one measurement (such as the position of a particle), the less accurate another measurement pertaining to the same particle (such as its momentum) must become. The first quantum theory: Max Planck and black-body radiation[edit] Hot metalwork. Thermal radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted from the surface of an object due to the object's internal energy. Heating it further causes the colour to change from red to yellow, white, and blue, as it emits light at increasingly shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies). Predictions of the amount of thermal radiation of different frequencies emitted by a body.

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