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Shotcut Google for Education: Computational Thinking Computational Thinking (CT) is a problem solving process that includes a number of characteristics and dispositions. CT is essential to the development of computer applications, but it can also be used to support problem solving across all disciplines, including math, science, and the humanities. Students who learn CT across the curriculum can begin to see a relationship between subjects as well as between school and life outside of the classroom. CT involves a number of skills, including: These skills are supported and enhanced by a number of dispositions or attitudes that include: Confidence in dealing with complexity Persistence in working with difficult problems Tolerance for ambiguity The ability to deal with open ended problems The ability to communicate and work with others to achieve a common goal or solution See our Computational Thinking Concepts Guide for a printable version of this list, along with teaching tips for each concept.

Journal of Educational Technology & Society DigCompEdu. Digital Competence Framework for Educators The teaching professions face rapidly changing demands, which require a new, broader and more sophisticated set of competences than before. The ubiquity of digital devices and applications, in particular, requires educators to develop their digital competence. The European Framework for the Digital Competence of Educators (DigCompEdu) is a scientifically sound framework describing what it means for educators to be digitally competent. DigCompEdu details 22 competences organised in six Areas. The DigCompEdu study builds on previous work carried out to define citizens' Digital Competence in general, and Digitally Competent Education Oragnisations (DigCompOrg).

Open Video Annotation Project IGDA Game Access Clementine Innovative Learning Environments The Innovative Learning Environments (ILE) project has analysed how young people learn. It has studied which conditions and dynamics allow them to be able to learn better. By identifying concrete cases of innovative learning environments from all over the world, ILE has informed practice, leadership and reform through generating analysis of innovative and inspiring configurations of learning for children and young people. The distinctive contribution of the ILE project has been to analyse - with numerous international examples - innovative ways of organising learning at the micro level (learning environment) and how this connects to the meso level (networks and communities of practice) and strategies to implement learning change at the macro, system level. The goals of this project have been to serve the educational reform agenda by:

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