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6 Books Everyone (Including Your English Teacher) Got Wrong

6 Books Everyone (Including Your English Teacher) Got Wrong
#3. Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Anybody who grew up in the 1960s (and still remembers anything about it) can tell you what Lewis Carroll's classic children's book was really all about: A girl takes a "trip" down the rabbit hole and finds herself in a surreal world where animals start talking to her. After she eats some "mushrooms," everything starts to change sizes before her eyes. She meets an over-stimulated "white rabbit" and a stoned caterpillar smoking a "shitload of drugs." We didn't really need Jefferson Airplane to clarify it; Alice in Wonderland is the Fear and Loathing of fairy tales. What it's really about: Lewis Carroll was the pen name of the very conservative Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Anglican deacon and professor of mathematics. All the weird drug-trippy stuff that's been misinterpreted since Woodstock is, we're sorry to say, really just an elaborate satire of modern mathematics. Dodgson to new mathematics: "Get the hell off my lawn." #2. #1.

http://www.cracked.com/article_18787_6-books-everyone-including-your-english-teacher-got-wrong_p2.html

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Ian Hacking Ian Hacking, CC, FRSC, FBA (born February 18, 1936) is a Canadian philosopher, specializing in the philosophy of science. Life[edit] Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, he has undergraduate degrees from the University of British Columbia (1956) and the University of Cambridge (1958), where he was a student at Trinity College, Cambridge. Hacking also took his Ph.D. at Cambridge (1962), under the direction of Casimir Lewy, a former student of Ludwig Wittgenstein's. He taught at UBC in Canada as an Assistant Professor, then an Associate Professor, spending some time teaching at the Makerere University in Uganda.

What 10 Classic Books Were Almost Called Remember when your high school summer reading list included Atticus , Fiesta , and The Last Man in Europe ? You will once you see what these books were renamed before they hit bookshelves. 1. THE COMPOSITES Casting Study: Miami Blues For the first in this series of comparing character descriptions against actors in adaptations, The Composites will look at Miami Blues, the 1984 novel by Charles Willeford and the 1990 film starring Alec Baldwin. Charles Willeford was unique among crime writers. His novels defied the conventions of the genre with naturalistic pacing, droll wit, and a melancholic worldview. During an exile from crime writing, Willeford self-published experimental poetry and memoir, including a book-length account of his hemorrhoidectomy, before returning to the genre with his Hoke Moseley series, the first of which is Miami Blues. Fresh out of prison and on a spree at the beginning of the novel, Junior Frenger is an engagingly rational sociopath who decides to settle down in suburban Miami—not to retire, but to rob his new neighbors while posing as Detective Moseley.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities The Death and Life of Great American Cities is a 1961 book by writer and activist Jane Jacobs. The book is a critique of 1950s urban planning policy, which it holds responsible for the decline of many city neighborhoods in the United States.[1] Going against the common wisdom of the age, it proposes new ideas that it says would ensure organic vibrancy in urban America. Contents[edit] The 13 scariest books of all time NOT written by Stephen King Yes, we all know King is the Sultan of Scare, and that books like The Shining, Salem's Lot, and It will make you quake in your fuzzy slippers. But here are 13 books that'll start the shivers while spreading the wealth. SILENCE OF THE LAMBS Thomas Harris This isn't the first time we'd meet the psychopathic Hannibal Lecter—that'd be Red Dragon—but it was the most eerie. And what's more, he wasn't the only serial baddie at work: Buffalo Bill took his share of trophies as Silence of the Lambs worked its way into the public's collective cerebral cortex.

Book-A-Minute Classics Got another book report to do? English teachers have the inconsiderate habit of assigning mammoth-sized works of literature to read and then actually expecting you to do it. This wouldn't be so bad except that invariably the requisite reading is as boring as fly fishing in an empty lake. Half of those books don't even have discernible plots. And let's face it -- the Cliff's Notes are pretty time-consuming too.

Amazing Scenery Carved out of the Books A native of Quebec, Canadian Guy Larame – a man fully talented. He is not only a gifted painter and sculptor, but also won the recognition of a musician, composer and director. Guy has devoted more than thirty years, the art of life, his work is known in many art galleries, he has performed in numerous theaters around the world. However, inexplicably, he manages to find time to one of his main hobby – anthropology. Guy Larame carves beautiful mountain landscapes and architectural patterns from old books. His designs are called “Great Wall” and “Byblos” are known around the world. Derecho A shelf cloud along the leading edge of a derecho photographed in Minnesota A derecho (/dəˈreɪtʃoʊ/, də-reh-choh, from Spanish: derecho [deˈɾetʃo], "straight") is a widespread, long-lived, straight-line wind storm that is associated with a land-based, fast-moving band of severe thunderstorms. Derechos can carry hurricanic or tornadic force and can deliver torrential rains and perhaps flash floods as well as strong winds.

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