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6 Books Everyone (Including Your English Teacher) Got Wrong

6 Books Everyone (Including Your English Teacher) Got Wrong
#3. Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Anybody who grew up in the 1960s (and still remembers anything about it) can tell you what Lewis Carroll's classic children's book was really all about: A girl takes a "trip" down the rabbit hole and finds herself in a surreal world where animals start talking to her. After she eats some "mushrooms," everything starts to change sizes before her eyes. She meets an over-stimulated "white rabbit" and a stoned caterpillar smoking a "shitload of drugs." We didn't really need Jefferson Airplane to clarify it; Alice in Wonderland is the Fear and Loathing of fairy tales. What it's really about: Lewis Carroll was the pen name of the very conservative Reverend Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Anglican deacon and professor of mathematics. All the weird drug-trippy stuff that's been misinterpreted since Woodstock is, we're sorry to say, really just an elaborate satire of modern mathematics. Dodgson to new mathematics: "Get the hell off my lawn." #2. #1. Related:  Filosofie & Leven

12 Must-See Skywatching Events in 2012 | 2012 Skywatching Events Guide &... This story was updated on Jan. 2. As the year 2011 comes to a close, some might wonder what is looming sky-wise for 2012? What celestial events might we look forward to seeing? I've selected what I consider to be the top 12 "skylights" for this coming year, and list them here in chronological order. Hopefully your local weather will cooperate on most, if not all, of these dates. Jan. 4: Quadrantid meteor shower peaks This meteor shower reaches its peak in the predawn hours of Jan. 4 for eastern North America. From the eastern half of North America, a single observer might count on seeing as many as 50-to-100 "Quads" in a single hour. The first major meteor shower of 2012 takes place on the night of Tuesday, Jan. 3 and the morning of Wednesday, Jan. 4. Feb. 20 to March 12: Best evening apparition of Mercury In February and March, the "elusive" innermost planet Mercury moves far enough from the glare of the sun to be readily visible soon after sunset. March 3: Mars arrives at opposition

5 Terrible Situations for the Socially Awkward Man You probably know how to function in society. You know how to talk to new people, how to order food in restaurants, and you know exactly what time you're supposed to show up at parties. I'm here to let you know that there's an entirely separate class of people that doesn't know all of those things. They show up too early to things, they disappointingly eat full meals they never ordered because they're too afraid to tell the waiter to send it back, and they have no idea how to shake hands with black people. They are socially awkward, they are everywhere, and these are their nightmares. Massages are probably really great. Getting a massage means being mostly naked while getting intensely rubbed by a complete stranger while something shitty, probably Enya, plays in the background. "Look, your head is full-on inside her vagina, there's no way this is against the rules, I'm gonna stop by and say Hi." And that will never make sense to you. Standing Next to Someone at a Urinal *You feel cold.

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 30 Books Everyone Should Read Before Their 30th Birthday The Web is grand. With its fame for hosting informative, easy-to-skim textual snippets and collaborative written works, people are spending more and more time reading online. Nevertheless, the Web cannot replace the authoritative transmissions from certain classic books that have delivered (or will deliver) profound ideas around the globe for generations. The 30 books listed here are of unparalleled prose, packed with wisdom capable of igniting a new understanding of the world. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse – A powerful story about the importance of life experiences as they relate to approaching an understanding of reality and attaining enlightenment.1984 by George Orwell – 1984 still holds chief significance nearly 60 years after it was written in 1949. Related True Measure of Understanding: Ignorance Generates Negativity In the absence of understanding human reaction is generally negative. August 27, 2007 In "Aspirations" 18 Great Reads That Changed My Life August 9, 2010 In "Hacks"

Science Fiction and Fantasy Book Reviews - StumbleUpon The 5 Strangest Things Evolution Left in Your Body If you don't believe in evolution, you have to spend a lot of time wondering about the useless shit the creator threw into our bodies. Why don't our wisdom teeth fit in our heads? Why do we need an appendix? The answer is that evolution is a sloppy and haphazard process. There is a little girl standing behind you with dark, sunken eyes and a deadpan expression. Did you feel that slight tingling sensation on the back of your neck? But mostly when scared and 11. They can also appear when we feel sexually aroused or when we feel in awe of something, like listening to a moving piece of music, or if you're the type, watching monster trucks smash smaller cars (to each his own). But Why? Ever see the fur on the back of a scared or angry animal suddenly stand straight up? It's that. Like this. There is really no reason to have this reaction anymore as it's of no use to us. Goosebumps raise the hairs on an animals for two main reasons. Above: not bear-food. For... um, warmth. We warned you.

Ian Hacking Ian Hacking, CC, FRSC, FBA (born February 18, 1936) is a Canadian philosopher, specializing in the philosophy of science. Life[edit] Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, he has undergraduate degrees from the University of British Columbia (1956) and the University of Cambridge (1958), where he was a student at Trinity College, Cambridge. Hacking also took his Ph.D. at Cambridge (1962), under the direction of Casimir Lewy, a former student of Ludwig Wittgenstein's. He taught at UBC in Canada as an Assistant Professor, then an Associate Professor, spending some time teaching at the Makerere University in Uganda. Works[edit] In his later work (from 1990 onward), his focus has shifted somewhat from the natural sciences to the human sciences, partly under the influence of the work of Michel Foucault. Awards and lectures[edit] In 2002, he was awarded the first Killam Prize for the Humanities, Canada's most distinguished award for outstanding career achievements. Selected works[edit]

74 Books to Read if You Love the Hunger Games If you haven't read the Hunger Games you really should! They're pretty awesome. Check them out: If you're already a fan of the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins... You should add these books to your to be read pile! (The recommendations are in no particular order.) Matched Trilogy by Ally Condie In a world where Officials pick your perfect mate, what happens when you’ve two choices? Maze Runner Trilogy by James Dashner A boy wakes up in a Glade with other boys knowing only his name, not how he got there, or how to escape the enclosed walls. Giver Quartet by Lois Lowry A young boy is given the job to retain the Community’s memories and to advise them using that knowledge, but he doesn’t like what he sees when he knows the past. Books of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau A city of light amidst the darkness begins to go black and survival means finding a way out by going through the unknown. Uglies Quartet by Scott Westerfeld Selection Trilogy by Kiera Cass UPDATE: Novellas added to series: The Prince , The Guard

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