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His Dark Materials

His Dark Materials
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The Subtle Knife Plot summary[edit] Lyra revisits Dr. Malone the next day, but after accepting a ride from the well-dressed Sir Charles Latrom, she discovers that Sir Charles has stolen her alethiometer and she asks Will to help her retrieve it. When Lyra and Will confront Sir Charles, he readily admits that he has stolen the alethiometer and blackmails the pair into retrieving a mysterious knife from Cittàgazze in exchange for its return. They defeat the youth who holds the knife but Will receives a distinctive wound – the loss of two fingers – which the knife's true guardian explains as the sign that he is now the next true guardian of the Subtle Knife, a tool that cuts windows between worlds and cuts easily through anything – both material and spiritual. He explains further that this world is haunted by soul-eating Spectres, which prey on older children and adults but are invisible to children of their age, and that the knife must not fall into Sir Charles' hands. Mrs. Critical reception[edit] [edit]

WillNye comments on A foreign politician wants to buy my domain name from me. How much do I charge? William Shakespeare William Shakespeare (/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/;[1] 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[nb 1] was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2] He is often called England's national poet, and the "Bard of Avon".[3][nb 2] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 38 plays,[nb 3] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[4] Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.[6][nb 4] His early plays were primarily comedies and histories, which are regarded as some of the best work ever produced in these genres. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. Life Early life London and theatrical career Later years and death man Plays

The Phenomenon of Man The Phenomenon of Man (Le Phénomène Humain, 1955) is a book written by French philosopher, paleontologist and Jesuit priest Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. In this work, Teilhard describes evolution as a process that leads to increasing complexity, culminating in the unification of consciousness. The book was finished in the 1930s, but was published posthumously in 1955. The Roman Catholic Church initially prohibited the publishing some of Teilhard’s writings on the grounds that they contradicted orthodoxy. The foreword to the book was written by one of the key scientific advocates for natural selection and evolution of the 20th Century, and co-developer of the modern synthesis in biology, Julian Huxley. Summary[edit] The development of science and technology causes an expansion of the human sphere of influence, allowing a person to be simultaneously present in every corner of the world. In Teilhard’s view, evolution will culminate in the Omega Point, a sort of supreme consciousness.

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist. Early life[edit] Huxley began his learning in his father's well-equipped botanical laboratory, then went to Hillside School, Malvern. I believe his blindness was a blessing in disguise. Career[edit] Bloomsbury Set[edit] United States[edit] Post World War II[edit] Association with Vedanta[edit]

The Amber Spyglass The Amber Spyglass is the third and final novel in the His Dark Materials series, written by English author Philip Pullman, and published in 2000. The Amber Spyglass won the 2001 Whitbread Book of the Year award, a British literature award, making it the first children's novel to receive the honour.[1] It was named Children's Book of the Year at the 2001 British Book Awards, and was also longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, again the first time this had happened to a children's book.[2] Plot[edit] At the end of The Subtle Knife, Marisa Coulter captured Lyra. In Cittàgazze, two angels, Balthamos and Baruch, tell Will, the bearer of the Subtle Knife, that they are taking him to Lord Asriel. Three forces – Will, Iorek, and Balthamos; Lord Asriel's army; and the army of the Magisterium – converge on Mrs. "Lyra+Will" carved in the bench in the Oxford Botanic Garden. Lyra returns to Jordan College. Changes to U.S. edition[edit] The changed lines are italicized below: Chapter headings[edit]

I feel pain. | Karen Cheng A while back I went through a breakup. This one was especially painful. But as I lay there I remembered a story a teacher once told me. Over the next few days I said it to myself over and over again. There was an old man who lived in a village with his son. I concocted my own version of this story for my newly fresh breakup. It’s so easy to go through life labeling everything that happens as good or bad. It’s so easy to label emotions, too. There’s a girl who literally cannot feel pain. Appreciate joy. It’s not good or bad, it just is. F. Scott Fitzgerald Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are the paradigmatic writings of the Jazz Age, a term he coined. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.[1] Fitzgerald is considered a member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby (his most famous), and Tender Is the Night. A fifth, unfinished novel, The Love of the Last Tycoon, was published posthumously. Life and career[edit] Born in 1896 in Saint Paul, Minnesota, to an upper-middle-class family, Fitzgerald was named after his famous second cousin, three times removed, Francis Scott Key,[2] but was referred to by the familiar moniker Scott Fitzgerald. In 1908, his father was fired from Procter & Gamble, and the family returned to Minnesota, where Fitzgerald attended St. Zelda Fitzgerald[edit] "The Jazz Age"[edit] F.

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