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Multiple Alleles

Multiple Alleles
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Mendelian inheritance Gregor Mendel, the German-speaking Augustinian monk who founded the modern science of genetics. Mendelian inheritance was initially derived from the work of Gregor Johann Mendel published in 1865 and 1866 which was re-discovered in 1900. It was initially very controversial. History[edit] The laws of inheritance were derived by Gregor Mendel, a nineteenth-century Austrian monk conducting hybridization experiments in garden peas (Pisum sativum).[1] Between 1856 and 1863, he cultivated and tested some 5,000 pea plants. Mendel's conclusions were largely ignored. Mendel's findings allowed other scientists to predict the expression of traits on the basis of mathematical probabilities. Mendel's laws[edit] Mendel discovered that when crossing purebred white flower and purple flower plants, the result is not a blend. Mendel summarized his findings in three laws: the Law of Segregation, the Law of Independent Assortment, and the Law of Dominance. Law of Segregation (The "First Law")[edit] Notes[edit]

The Biology Corner Bright Ideas That Work What's even better than a bright idea? A bright idea that works! Educators from across the country have discovered excellent ways to tackle some common classroom stumbling blocks. Below are their step-by-step suggestions on how to handle issues like the fourth-grade slump or the development of critical thinking skills. Take advantage of their experience and put these ideas to use in your own classroom — and if you have a bright idea of your own, let us know! Essential Actions: 15 Research-based Practices to Increase EL Student Achievement In this article written for Colorín Colorado, Bright Ideas author Kristina Robertson offers an overview of WIDA's new Essential Actions handbook and shares a step-by-step process for using this valuable tool as part of a professional learning community focused meeting ELLs' academic language needs. Common Core and ELLs: Key Shifts in Language Arts and Literacy (Part II) Teaching Tips: Summer School for English Language Learners 'Welcome Kit' for New ELLs

good layman ecology books? | Ecology and the environment Depending on how narrowly you want to focus on ecology, several authors come to mind (kind of obvious) - Edward O. It might be a good idea to read stuff on the ecology of your own region, if you can, stuff you can go out and see for yourself. Your local nature center might have some. And you can't go wrong with Darwin. Heredity - Genes and Alleles As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation

ENSI/SENSI: Evolution/Nat.of Sci.Home Page 19 February 2017 ATTENTION, FILMMAKERS! A chance to make a film about evolution and win a prize! Scientists and science educators of all stripes -- students, postdocs, faculty, and full- or part-time science communicators -- are invited to enter the Seventh Annual Evolution Video Competition, sponsored by the Duke Initiative for Science & Society, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action. To enter, please submit a video that explains a fun fact, key concept, compelling question, or exciting area of evolution research in three minutes or less. The finalists will be screened at the Evolution 2017 meeting in Portland, Oregon. For information about the contest, visit:

How To Teach The Language Of Opinions Teaching the language that students need in order to give and ask for opinions, rather than just asking them to do so. Written by Alex Case for EnglishClub I think it is fair to say that most language learners are asked to give their opinion much more in class than in the rest of their lives. This is true of British and American education – with formal debates and essays giving your own opinion being common in secondary education and the beginning of university but almost non-existent in real life – but even more so in “communicative” EFL settings. I am in the fairly typical position of being someone who has never taken part in a debate even in English. One possible reaction to all this would simply be to use more of a range of ways of speaking in class, e.g. more personal questions and extended speaking tasks, to keep the number of opinions given and asked for down. What students need to know about the language of opinions

Scripps Ranch Senior High General Review Websites for all Biology Students:On-line Biology BookBioReviewThe Biology Project-University of ArizonaStudying Guides and Study StratagiesFun Biology Games to play after your Biology Homework is done!If you are a visual learner--these are great Biology Animations Does the University or College YOU want to attend accept AP Credit:AP Credit Policy (Caution, types of credit may vary and this list may not be complete)General Review Notes for AP Biology Students:Bozeman Biology Lecture Series – These are Great! A huge THANK YOU to Mr. SPECIFIC REVIEW BY TOPIC: Chemistry Biochemistry Basics pH Video Lecture:pH Water Video Lecture:Water Video Lecture:Chemical Bonds Amino Acids and Proteins Library of 3-D Molecular Structures Chemistry Tutorial ChemiCool Periodic Table WebElements Periodic Table Chemical Bonding Water Resources of the United States Protein Structures (cool but very complex) Macromolecules Cells Cell Size Cell Biology Basics Amazing Cells Cell Function Cell Membranes Cell Anatomy

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