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Artist Brian Dettmer Carves Old Books into Intricate Narrative Sculptures Brian Dettmer – Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

Artist Brian Dettmer Carves Old Books into Intricate Narrative Sculptures Brian Dettmer – Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World
Most of Dettmer’s focus is on books, favoring out of date encyclopedias, medical journals, illustration books and dictionaries. He begins carving away arbitrarily at the pages, letting the images reveal themselves as he moves through his process. He seals the edges of the books to ensure precision, which also transforms the splayed edges to look like a smooth and sanded piece of wood. Carefully extracting bits and pieces, he creates a narrative within the books’ contents, revealing selected sentences and images. The spines are bent and contorted to juxtapose different sections of the books together. No sections are removed or added, Dettmer simply works with the existing structure of each book. The resulting beautiful sculptures completely reinterpret the original intention of each book. Dettmer’s messages range from narrative to political, with spiral sculptures of butterflies from a lepidoptery journal, or a scene of layered illustrated animals from a children’s book. + Brian Dettmer

http://inhabitat.com/artist-brian-dettmer-carves-old-books-into-intricate-narrative-sculptures/brian-dettmer10/

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Odani Motohiko Sculptures <div class="noscript"><div class="noscript-inner"><p><strong>JavaScript seem to be disabled in your browser.</strong></p><p>You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website.</p></div></div> The page you requested was not found, and we have a fine guess why.

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Quilling - Turning Paper Strips into Intricate Artworks Quilling has been around for hundreds of years, but it’s still as impressive and popular now as it was during the Renaissance. The art of quilling first became popular during the Renaissance, when nuns and monks would use it to roll gold-gilded paper and decorate religious objects, as an alternative to the expensive gold filigree. Later, during the 18th and 19th centuries, it became a favorite pass-time of English ladies who created wonderful decorations for their furniture and candles, through quilling. Basically, the quilling process consists of cutting strips of paper, and rolling them with a special tool. It sounds simple enough, but special skill is required to create more advanced shapes like marquises, arrowheads or holly leaves.

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