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23 Writing Websites to Improve Your Writing

23 Writing Websites to Improve Your Writing
We are all apprentices in a craft where no one ever becomes a master. ~Ernest Hemingway How strong is your writing? No matter how good you think it is, there’s always room for improvement. In most cases, plenty of room. Luckily, there are some amazing websites that’ll help you improve your writing, and take it to the next level. (***By the way, have you seen this amazing online creative writing course, “Story Is a State of Mind,” created by Giller finalist Sarah Selecky? Want to strengthen your story, empower your performance, and beef up on the publishing business? Here are 23 sites (in no particular order) I look to for daily inspiration and advice: PS If you find this list useful, please share it on Twitter, Facebook or StumbleUpon – I’d really appreciate it! 4) Query Shark A query critique site you don’t want to miss. 5) Men with Pens Fantastic articles on copywriting and freelancing. 6) Ask Allison Writing and publishing Q&A by novelist Allison Winn Scotch.

https://writeitsideways.com/23-websites-that-make-your-writing-stronger/

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Stupidity Rules for Creative Professionals I'm having trouble being stupid. Productively stupid, that is. I have infinite reserves of unproductive stupidity—ignoring my car's oil light, losing my wallet, hiring the wrong person. The Secret of Writing Funny Writing funny Do you want to learn the secrets of writing funny? Check out the five tips below. Laughter has instantaneous health benefits including relaxation, lowering blood pressure, curing male pattern baldness and increasing immune system response. Almost all of these health benefits can all be obtained by making your reader giggle, laugh, guffaw or otherwise shoot beverages out an unexpected orifice.

These ‘Color Thesaurus’ Charts Let You Correctly Name Any Color Imaginable Ingrid Sundberg, a writer and children’s book illustrator, created a very useful infographic chart for anyone struggling with color names. The writer says that she loves to collect words that can help give her stories variety and depth. Show Full Text “I’ve learned that we all have different associations with color words,” Sundberg told Bored Panda. “For example the color sapphire is a light blue to me (since that’s the color of the sapphire on my engagement ring), but a sapphire can also be a very dark blue.

Writing communities and networking strategies in the Digital Age When you first started composing your masterpiece, you probably thought the biggest hurdle was actually getting it done. By now, you’ve learned there are many more challenges than just the writing process. You need to find an editor, a publisher, a peer review group. And, you need to engage in some serious marketing – of yourself and your book.

25 Things You Should Know About Character - StumbleUpon Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Personal Creativity Lives in All of Us philmckinney | June 24, 2013 We have all heard someone say, “Oh, I am not a creative person at all. I don’t paint, draw, write, or do anything like that.” 25 Things You Should Know About Word Choice 1. A Series Of Word Choices Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices. Words are the building blocks of what we do. They are the atoms of our elements.

Time Tracking by Brenda Anderson Do you have trouble keeping track of time while writing your book? Brenda Anderson has a couple of tips for you. -- Sandy Brenda: My Coming Home Series follows a family—one couple in particular—through a period of eight years. It’s difficult enough keeping track of characters and dates for a single book, much less through four books and several years. 5 Apps That Can Improve Your Writing Skills As a writer, if you want to get better, the biggest thing you can do is to keep writing. The more you write, the more consistent you become, and the better a writer you’ll be. Having a great writing environment is a huge part of that, but the biggest thing is to keep writing.

Fifteen Ways to Write a Novel Every year I get asked what I think about NaNoWriMo, and I don’t know how to answer, because I don’t want to say, “I think it makes you write a bad novel.” This is kind of the point. You’re supposed to churn out 50,000 words in one month, and by the end you have a goddamn novel, one you wouldn’t have otherwise. If it’s not Shakespeare, it’s still a goddamn novel. In Defense of Polymaths - Kyle Wiens by Kyle Wiens | 8:54 AM May 18, 2012 Polymath is one of those words more likely to show up on the SAT than in everyday conversation. But the reason we don’t use the word much these days has less to do with vocabulary than it has to do with practicality: there aren’t a lot of polymaths around anymore. In case you don’t have your pocket dictionary handy, a polymath is a person with a wide range of knowledge or learning. Think people like Leonardo da Vinci (artist and helicopter designer), Benjamin Franklin (founding father, inventor, and all-around lady-killer), Paul Robeson (scholar, athlete, actor, and civil rights activist), and even Steve Jobs (engineer, businessman extraordinaire, and marketing mastermind). Still, while we admire the select “geniuses” that can do it all, we tend to disparage the regular folk who attempt to spread their knowledge around a little.

Four Ways to Cut Your Novel's Draft (and Make Your Story Stronger) Image from Flickr by adrperez Is your novel looking a little bloated? Do you have a sneaking feeling you’ve repeated yourself a few times? 8 Essential Habits for Effective Writing When it comes to blogging we all know that content is king and keeping things updated is the number one priority. But how do you do that when you (at times literally) have a monkey on your back? Between children, coworkers, construction, and other c words that stand for chaos, it is a wonder we can get anything written at all.

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