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[K-6] Doing Internet Research at the Elementary Level

[K-6] Doing Internet Research at the Elementary Level
One of the hardest things to teach, in my opinion, is research. I have been teaching in a computer lab for going on five years and I have never taught research the same way twice. This is partially because I never teach anything the same way twice, but it's also because each year I learn something new. Sometimes I learn the hard way when things don't pan out the way I planned in the classroom, sometimes I learn because something I didn't plan arose and worked out well, and sometimes its due to my own self-education as I prepare to teach my annual research unit. I begin teaching research skills in third grade -- just at the time where my students' reading skills are such that they can feel successful and just at the time when they have mounds and mounds of natural curiosity. In the past, I have done your typical find-information-and-regurgitate-it-to-me kinds of projects, all in the name of teaching students how to locate information. Choosing a Topic, Creating Keywords and Search Terms Related:  Teaching Research

Put an End to Plagiarism in Your Classroom According to a report by Plagiarism.org, "Studies indicate that approximately 30 percent of all students may be plagiarizing on every written assignment they complete." Kids plagiarize for a variety of reasons. Some kids are lazy, some are unmotivated, some are disorganized, and some just don't understand what plagiarism really is. In 2002, a high school teacher in Piper, Kansas, resigned after the local school board ordered her to raise the grades of 28 students who had failed her course after being caught plagiarizing on a semester-long research project. Whatever the facts, the case dramatically illustrates a problem that has become increasingly common with the growing use of the Internet in our nation's classrooms. Why do kids plagiarize? When assigning research paper, teachers can employ strategies to minimize plagiarizing in their classrooms, no matter what their students' reasons might be: Make sure your students know that plagiarism will not be tolerated.

The 6 Online Research Skills Your Students Need 1. Check Your Sources The Skill: Evaluating information found in your sources on the basis of accuracy, validity, appropriateness for needs, importance, and social and cultural context The Challenge: While most kids know not to believe everything they read online, the majority also don’t take the time to fully evaluate their sources, according to the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The same study showed that, on average, kids as young as 11 rate themselves as quite proficient Internet users, which may inflate their confidence. The Solution: As a class, discuss the benchmarks for evaluating a website: currency (Is the information up to date?) 2. The Skills: Developing and refining search queries to get better research results The Challenge: Students will enter a search term, say, “Abraham Lincoln,” and comb through pages of results that aren’t related to their research (think Lincoln beards, Lincoln Logs), rather than narrowing their original query (“Lincoln assassination”).

Frontiers for Young Minds Purdue OWL This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice. Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. Important notice on the MLA 9 Update: The OWL plays no role in style guide changes. If you are having trouble locating a specific resource, please visit the search page or the Site Map. The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. For more information about services for the Purdue University community, including one-to-one consultations, ESL conversation groups and workshops, please visit the Writing Lab site. Mission A Message From the Assistant Director of Content Development The Purdue OWL is committed to supporting students and instructors of writing courses during this difficult time. All the best,Garrett

The National High School Journal of Science Elementary Research Rubric University of Wisconsin - Stout — Schedule of Online Courses, Online Certificate Programs, and Graduate Degree Follow us on Teaching materials Teaching materials Evolution is essential to our curriculum and to scientific literacy. Imagine teaching social science without teaching history; students would lack perspective on events going on today. Similarly, to understand the big picture of biology, students need to understand life on Earth in terms of its history and its future — the changing life forms and ecosystems that have arisen and changed over billions of years, as well as the mechanisms that have brought about those changes. The Understanding Evolution project aims to help instructors develop student understanding of: We've assembled a variety of resources to help you increase student understanding of evolution.

TeachersFirst: Embracing Reseach - Primary Students Research/Information literacy projects with primary students Do your students understand the difference between reading fiction and reading informational texts? How much practice have your students had reading for information? It is essential that students have some background knowledge of the text features they are likely to encounter in reading non-fiction texts while doing research. If you have not already taught a series of mini-lessons about the table of contents, index, sidebars, captions, guide words, diagrams, glossary, comparisons, cross-sections/cutaways, maps, and charts you should consider doing so before asking students to complete research. Knowing the purpose of each of these features or conventions and how they help the reader gives your students a distinct advantage in tackling many informational texts. Will you introduce the idea of giving credit to sources?

TeachersFirst: Embracing Reseach - Middle School Research/Information literacy projects with students in middle grades How will you help students to build a good search? You might want to begin by showing the short video Web Search Strategies in Plain Englishproduced by Common Craft. Search terms, keywords, relevant vocabulary and related topics can be organized using a mindmapping tool like MindMeister or Drop Mind. How will your students know whether the web content they find is worthwhile? Help students organize the information they gather. Tools like Evernote, Simplybox, and iCyte allow students to collect information, images, links, notes and keep them all in one place. Practical tip: Choose ONE notetaking/collection tool to use throughout the school year for projects, preferably with all teachers on your teaching team (or throughout the school) using the same tool. Help students to track their resources. Don’t wait until the research is done before announcing this requirement.

TeachersFirst: Embracing Reseach - Grades 3-5 Research/Information literacy projects with students grades 3-5 Do your students understand the difference between reading fiction and reading informational texts? How much practice have your students had reading for information? It is essential that students have some background knowledge of the text features they are likely to encounter in reading non-fiction texts while doing research. If you have not already taught a series of mini-lessons about the table of contents, index, sidebars, captions, guide words, diagrams, glossary, comparisons, cross-sections/cutaways, maps, and charts you should consider doing so before asking students to complete research. Knowing the purpose of each of these features or conventions and how they help the reader gives your students a distinct advantage in tackling many informational texts. Will you introduce the idea of giving credit to sources? Practical tip: share this process as you model other research steps, such as on the frist day of research time!

Keeping it Honest: Effective Study Skills | The P.A. - News, Stories, and More from Virtual High School Let’s examine key study skills so you can avoid the temptation to take short cuts when writing papers, listening to instructional videos or lectures, or studying for quizzes, tests, or exams. Working with credible sources will allow you to create writing and presentations that reflect valid ideas and research. Consider the following questions: Who created the source? For effective note-taking: Avoid copying research word-for-word. To paraphrase means to write a text that is similar to the original, but the new passage must be written in your words. Reread unclear sections at least twice. Learning effective study skills will lead to academic success during your time at Virtual High School. This post is part of our Academic Integrity Series. Let’s examine key study skills so you can avoid the temptation to take short cuts when writing papers, listening to instructional videos or lectures, or studying for quizzes, tests, or exams. Who created the source? For effective note-taking:

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