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4 Groups that Gotta Go - George Carlin

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Love American Skin | Photography Last week German photographer and filmmaker Diana Scheunemann unveiled her probing debut film, Love American Skin, a road trip across America that documented the many contrasting characters and viewpoints that make up one of the biggest nation’s in the world. Compelling watching, the film throws up opinions that may ruffle a few feathers but adds to our understanding of the vastness of the country, and the differences that one encounters from state to state. We catch up with Diana to talk through her experiences of making the film. Me and my partner had been living in NYC for a few years. You hear all these partisan views on the TV but we wanted to see for ourselves what this country we now live in is like, and form an opinion based on our own experience instead of from Hollywood movies and charged news commentators. We found nearly all of the Americans we met to be really open. There are some states where you can be shot just for stepping on someone’s property. That people are people.

Is Ignorance Really Bliss? A regular blog reader, Mitch Kosowski, sent along an interesting question: “Is ignorance truly bliss? Are people with lower intelligence happier than those with higher intelligence?” Let’s start with a quick literature review. Lisa Simpson: “As intelligence goes up, happiness goes down. Despite her formidable unhappiness, I don’t think Lisa is right on this one. But that’s theory; let’s crunch some numbers. The General Social Survey asks about happiness and also contains a simple vocabulary test, which we’ll use as a proxy for intelligence. There’s also a small reasoning-based test: Armed with these data, Lisa can make more graphs, and she’ll discover that those with stronger vocabularies or stronger analytic reasoning skills are more likely to be very happy, and less likely to be unhappy. These differences were also statistically significant. Even so, these happiness differences look small.

Gods and Goddesses [Gods and Aliens] When you study the mythologies of ancient civilizations, you realize they are all designed by the same geometric blueprint that follows into humanity's current timeline. In the physical we find duality on all levels, especially in the pantheons of creational forces linked to one another. We further find the pattern of creation and destruction ... repeating in the cycles of time ... embracing the human experience. Designing the gods and goddesses falls into the same categories of duality - good and bad - light and dark - forever seeking balance and the return to full consciousness. The study of Ancient Alien Theory allows one to understand that creator gods more than likely were aliens who created the race presently called humans, in its various forms, by biogenetic experimentation and manipulation. Always we find Gods who came from the sky (higher frequency) and those that came from the sea of creation (collective unconsciousness).

Marxism–Leninism Marxism–Leninism is a political ideology combining Marxism (the scientific socialist concepts theorised by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels) and Leninism (Vladimir Lenin's theoretical expansions of Marxism which include anti-imperialism, democratic centralism, and Vanguardist party-building principles).[1] Marxism–Leninism was the official ideology of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and of the Communist International (1919–43), making it the guiding ideology of the world communist movement. As such, it is the most prominent ideology associated with communism. The ultimate goal of Marxism–Leninism is the development of socialism into the full realisation of communism, a classless social system with common ownership of the means of production and with full social equality of all members of society. The phrase "Marxism–Leninism" was introduced by Joseph Stalin in the 1930s to distinguish the new synthesis of Marxism with the theories of Lenin. Values Etymology Historical Current usage

Un Certain Regard Un Certain Regard (French pronunciation: ​[œ̃ sɛʁtɛ̃ ʁəɡaʁ]; a certain regard) is a section of the Cannes Film Festival's official selection. It is run at the salle Debussy, parallel to the competition for the Palme d'Or. This section was introduced in 1978 by Gilles Jacob. Each year, it presents a score of films with various types of visions and styles; "original and different" works which seek international recognition. §Main Winners[edit] In 1998, the Prize Un Certain Regard (French: prix un certain regard) was introduced to the section to recognize young talent and to encourage innovative and daring works by presenting one of the films with a grant to aid its distribution in France.[1] Since 2005, the prize consists of €30,000 financed by the Groupama GAN Foundation.[2] * Denotes first win for a country §Complete List of Winners[edit] §References[edit]

Personal space Personal space is the region surrounding a person which they regard as psychologically theirs. Most people value their personal space and feel discomfort, anger, or anxiety when their personal space is encroached.[1] Permitting a person to enter personal space and entering somebody else's personal space are indicators of perception of the relationship between the people. There is an intimate zone reserved for lovers, children and close family members. There is another zone used for conversations with friends, to chat with associates, and in group discussions; a further zone is reserved for strangers, newly formed groups, and new acquaintances; and a fourth zone is used for speeches, lectures, and theater; essentially, public distance is that range reserved for larger audiences.[2] Entering somebody's personal space is normally an indication of familiarity and at times of intimacy. Size[edit] Two people not affecting each other's personal space Adaptation[edit] Interpersonal space[edit]

Manifesting the Mind THE WORD ‘PSYCHEDELIC’ means ‘manifesting the mind’. This documentary presents an analysis of Shamanism, psychedelics, drug addiction, DMT, communication with plant spirits, modern monotheism vs. Shamanism, culture and the drug war, the ancient mysteries, the amanita muscaria, Soma, and much more! Interviews include—Robert Bussinger, Mike Crowley, Timothy Freke, Peter Gandy, Alex Grey, Clark Heinrich, Nick Herbert, John Major Jenkins, Dennis McKenna, Terence McKenna, Daniel Pinchbeck, and Dr. If you watch this video, you’ll realise within the first few minutes why our governments are so desperate to prohibit the use of ‘psychedelics’… See also: ManifestingTheMind.com | BouncingBearFilms.com | DMT: The Spirit MoleculeGraham Hancock—The Drug War | Caminho Sagrado Xamanismo | Ayahuasca (Search) 1Czbe1ty2UQNHYxvpJqfJEdeaL2cYmzc5T

Engels on the English working class (by L. Proyect) Engels on the English working-class "The Condition of the Working Class in England" is a profoundly important book because it reveals the raw empirical data that confronted the young Engels. Out of the panorama of misery and class oppression that he observed in England in the 1840s, he came to the conclusion that proletarian revolution was necessary. He wrote the book when he was 24 years old and working at a branch of his father's cotton mills in Manchester, England. During a trip to Cologne in 1841, Engels met with the editors of the Rheinische Zeitung, a radical newspaper founded by industrialists to spread their liberal, free-trade ideas. In David McLellan's introduction to the Penguin edition of the "The Condition of the Working Class in England", he groups the work with such literary masterpieces as Charles Dicken's "Hard Times" or Elizabeth Gaskell's "Mary Barton". In the opening chapter "The Great Towns", Engels describes the alienation that afflicts the London of 1840.

Documentary List - The best documentaries to watch online The Viking Warriors The Vikings (from Old Norse víkingr) were seafaring north Germanic people who raided, traded, explored, and settled in wide areas of Europe, Asia, and the North Atlantic islands from the late 8th to the mid-11th centuries. The Vikings employed wooden longships with wide, shallow-draft hulls, allowing navigation in rough seas or in shallow river waters. The ships could be landed on beaches, and their light weight enabled them to be hauled over portages. These versatile ships allowed the Vikings to travel as far east as Constantinople and the Volga River in Russia, as far west as Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland, and as far south as Nekor.

Doodle A doodle is an unfocused or unconscious drawing made while a person's attention is otherwise occupied. Doodles are simple drawings that can have concrete representational meaning or may just be abstract shapes. Stereotypical examples of doodling are found in school notebooks, often in the margins, drawn by students daydreaming or losing interest during class. Other common examples of doodling are produced during long telephone conversations if a pen and paper are available. Popular kinds of doodles include cartoon versions of teachers or companions in a school, famous TV or comic characters, invented fictional beings, landscapes, geometric shapes, patterns and textures. Etymology[edit] The word doodle first appeared in the early 17th century to mean a fool or simpleton.[1] It may derive from the German Dudeltopf or Dudeldop, meaning simpleton or noodle (literally "nightcap").[1] In the movie Mr. Effects on memory[edit] Notable doodlers[edit] See also[edit] [edit] References[edit] Gombrich, E.

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