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List of wars and anthropogenic disasters by death toll

List of wars and anthropogenic disasters by death toll
This is a list of wars and anthropogenic disasters by death toll. It covers the lowest estimate of death as well as the highest estimate, the name of the event, the location, and the start and end of each event. Some events may belong in more than one category. In addition, some of the listed events overlap each other, and in some cases the death toll from a smaller event is included in the one for the larger event or time period of which it was part. Wars, armed conflicts, and genocides[edit] These figures of one million or more deaths include the deaths of civilians from diseases, famine, etc., as well as deaths of soldiers in battle and massacres and genocide. The United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) defines genocide in part as "acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group". Deadly prisons and camps[edit] Famine[edit] Floods and landslides[edit] Other deadly events[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars_and_anthropogenic_disasters_by_death_toll

Related:  2) DS1: WW2War & Peace

1945: US drops atomic bomb on Hiroshima 1945: US drops atomic bomb on Hiroshima The first atomic bomb has been dropped by a United States aircraft on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. President Harry S Truman, announcing the news from the cruiser, USS Augusta, in the mid-Atlantic, said the device was more than 2,000 times more powerful than the largest bomb used to date. An accurate assessment of the damage caused has so far been impossible due to a huge cloud of impenetrable dust covering the target. The Guantanamo Files In its latest release of classified US documents, WikiLeaks is shining the light of truth on a notorious icon of the Bush administration’s "War on Terror" — the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, which opened on January 11, 2002, and remains open under President Obama, despite his promise to close the much-criticized facility within a year of taking office. In thousands of pages of documents dating from 2002 to 2008 and never seen before by members of the public or the media, the cases of the majority of the prisoners held at Guantánamo — 765 out of 779 in total — are described in detail in memoranda from JTF-GTMO, the Joint Task Force at Guantánamo Bay, to US Southern Command in Miami, Florida. These memoranda, known as Detainee Assessment Briefs (DABs), contain JTF-GTMO’s recommendations about whether the prisoners in question should continue to be held, or should be released (transferred to their home governments, or to other governments). (Andy Worthington) 1. Personal information

1945: Atom bomb hits Nagasaki 1945: Atom bomb hits Nagasaki American forces have dropped an atomic bomb on Nagasaki - the second such attack on Japan in three days. The bomb was dropped by parachute from an American B29 Bomber at 1102 local time. It exploded about 1,625 ft (500m) above the ground and is believed to have completely destroyed the city, which is situated on the western side of the Japanese island of Kyushu. In a statement issued from Guam, General Carl A Spaatz, Commander of the US Strategic Air Forces in the Pacific, said: "The second use of the atomic bomb occurred at noon, August 9, at Nagasaki. "Crew members report good results.

Kabul War Diary Sunday, July 25 5pm EST. WikiLeaks today released over 75,000 secret US military reports covering the war in Afghanistan. The Afghan War Diary is an extraordinary secret compendium of over 91,000 reports covering the war in Afghanistan from 2004 to 2010. The reports describe the majority of lethal military actions involving the United States military. Why did World War II Start? - Children's British History Encyclopedia Since 1933, Germany had been ruled by Adolf Hitler and his political party, the Nazis. They wanted to take revenge for Germany’s defeat in the Great War by expanding Germany’s empire. In 1938, the Nazis invaded Austria and on 15th March 1939 they invaded Czechoslovakia. Next, on 1st September 1939, over a million Nazi troops then invaded Poland. The UK and France had promised to help the Poles if they were attacked so gave Hitler an ultimatum (final demand) by threatening war if his troops did not withdraw by 3rd September. Hitler ignored this threat and so war was declared.

Rogue State Official website of the author, historian, and U.S. foreign policy critic. A Guide to the World’s Only Superpower If you believed that the NATO (read U.S.) bombing of Yugoslavia for 78 days and nights in 1999 was a “humanitarian” act, Rogue State hopefully can serve as a wake-up call to both your intellect and your conscience. 5 Things You Don't Know About Anne Frank and Her Diary 1. Pseudonyms When Anne Frank readied her diary for eventual publication, she created pseudonyms for the people she wrote about in her diary. Although you are familiar with the pseudonyms of Albert Dussel (the real life Freidrich Pfeffer) and Petronella van Daan (the real life Auguste van Pels) because these pseudonyms appear in most published versions of the diary, do you know what pseudonym Anne chose for herself?

Baghdad War Diary At 5pm EST Friday 22nd October 2010 WikiLeaks released the largest classified military leak in history. The 391,832 reports ('The Iraq War Logs'), document the war and occupation in Iraq, from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2009 (except for the months of May 2004 and March 2009) as told by soldiers in the United States Army. Each is a 'SIGACT' or Significant Action in the war. They detail events as seen and heard by the US military troops on the ground in Iraq and are the first real glimpse into the secret history of the war that the United States government has been privy to throughout. The reports detail 109,032 deaths in Iraq, comprised of 66,081 'civilians'; 23,984 'enemy' (those labeled as insurgents); 15,196 'host nation' (Iraqi government forces) and 3,771 'friendly' (coalition forces).

World War 2: Thousands of children sent to safety Throughout the day thousands of boys and girls were sent by bus, tram, trolley bus, underground and on foot to the main-line railway terminal where they were entrained for the reception areas all over the country. Until the trains reached their destinations neither the children nor the adults who accompanied them knew whither they had been bound. “Is there going to be a war?”

The Threat of a Good Example, by Noam Chomsky (Excerpted from What Uncle Sam Really Wants) No country is exempt from U.S. intervention, no matter how unimportant. In fact, it's the weakest, poorest countries that often arouse the greatest hysteria. Take Laos in the 1960s, probably the poorest country in the world. Most of the people who lived there didn't even know there was such a thing as Laos; they just knew they had a little village and there was another little village nearby.

Children of the wartime evacuation In January 1941, Sheila Shear and her sister were evacuated from east London to the Chilterns and billeted with a bachelor called Harry Mayo. They came from very different backgrounds – the Shears were Jewish, he was Christian – but an affectionate bond developed between them. Weekly visits and holidays with Uncle Harry, as they came to know him, continued long after the war had ended. When Harry died, Sheila and her mother went to the funeral: "When we got to Chesham, we were treated like the closest members of his family.

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