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How to Make an Infographic: Free Visual E-Book for Beginners

How to Make an Infographic: Free Visual E-Book for Beginners
On average, Americans consume 63 gigabytes of information per person per day. That’s roughly half of all the storage space in a new MacBook Air laptop. With so much information bombarding us on a daily basis, it’s no wonder we’ve become desensitized to even the most shocking statistics. For example, what if I told you that the 74 million richest people in the world possess 50% of its wealth? The real meaning of this statement would probably be lost on most of us. The moment you translate it into a visual format, however, it suddenly becomes a much more palpable — and shocking — reality: That’s the power of infographics. A Step-By-Step Guide for Beginners Those who survive information overload will be those who search for information with broadband thinking but apply it with a single-minded focus. In a world of information overload, the ability to visualize information is more than just a nice-to-have skill — it’s now a necessity. Steps to Creating a Persuasive Infographic 2 Define your goals.

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15 Most Common Types of Data Visualisation — Datalabs With the growing amount and accessibility of data, data visualisation is becoming increasingly important. Not only does visualised data represent large quantities of data coherently, it doesn’t distort what the data has to say and helps the user discern relationships in the data. According to the writers of A Tour Through the Visualization Zoo, “The goal of visualization is to aid our understanding of data by leveraging the human visual system’s highly-tuned ability to see patterns, spot trends, and identify outliers.” In general, there are two basic types of data visualisation: exploration, which helps find a story the data is telling you, and explanation, which tells a story to an audience. Both types of data visualisation must take into account the audience’s expectations.

5 Activities for Peer Observation Martyn Clarke has worked in ELT classrooms as a teacher and trainer for over twenty years and in more than fifteen countries. He has taught English at all levels and in many contexts from one-to-one in financial institutions to rural schools with classes of eighty students. There are many reasons why peer observations with our teaching colleagues can be useful. They often share your background and so understand your students, books, pressures, etc. They usually approach problems from the same practical perspective as you. They probably know you and so often understand the best way to approach you.

Global Carbon Footprints About this graphic Graphics by Stephen Rountree and Adam Marr Source: World Resources Institute CAIT 2.0 climate data explorer Emissions data and national boundaries are from 2010. For current emissions, per capita emissions, and intensity, the data are measured in tons of "carbon dioxide equivalent." That is, they include carbon dioxide and five other greenhouse gases (methane, nitrous oxides, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride) as measured by their global warming potential. Cumulative emissions are measured in tons of carbon dioxide only. The emissions of Brazil and Indonesia may be understated because the numbers do not include calculations on land use change and forestry. There are high uncertainties in current measures of deforestation's contribution to greenhouse gas emissions, as international authorities work to develop a consistent methodology.

Oral Exam: Monologue Based on One or More Pictures. Some Tips and Ideas to Get Started In the intermediate and more advanced exam you will be presented with one, two or more pictures about the same topic but in clear contrast. It’s important to remember that you are not supposed to give a detailed description of everything that is happening in the picture(s). On the contrary, what is important is that you talk about the topic or idea suggested in the picture(s). If you are given for example 3 minutes to talk, use just one minute of this time to describe in general, using appropriate language and structures; the rest of the time should be dedicated to talking about the topic and giving your opinion. Make a list of the most common topics asked in the exam.Brainstorm vocabulary you can use related to this topic. Mind mapping works perfect here.

Seven dirty secrets of data visualisation net magazine is the number one choice for the professional web designer and developer. It’s here that you find out about the latest new web trends, technologies and techniques – all in one handy package. Each issue boasts a wealth of expert tips and advice, including in-depth features and over 30 pages of advanced front- and backend tutorials on subjects as diverse as CSS, HTML, JavaScript, WordPress, PHP, and plenty more. net compiles the hottest new sites from around the web, and being the voice of web design, our mission is to source the best articles written by the best people in the industry and feature interviews and opinions crammed with inspiration and creative advice. In short, If you're serious about web design and development, then net is the magazine for you. Editorial

50 Tips, Tricks and Ideas for Teaching Gifted Students - WeAreTeachers Gifted kids can be a joy to teach when you know how to identify what engages them. These 50 tips and tricks come from my own experience and from around the Web. They’re good to have in your bag of tricks whether you’re a newbie or an old hand at teaching these high-level thinkers. 1. Know Their Interests Every year, I start by having my students complete an interest inventory.

Radar graphs: Avoid them (99.9% of the time) Stephen Few doesn't like radar graphs, and he's not the only one who has written against them. In a recent discussion on Twitter, Jon Peltier said that they are "worse than pies" —ouch! Even Andy Kirk, who is usually as polite as a British gentleman can be, doesn't have nice words about this kind of display. Most of the arguments against radar graphs can be summarized in a couple of sentences from this post by Graham Odds: "Even with a common scale between axes, comparing values across them remains cumbersome and error-prone. This is because rather than the simple straight-line comparison our visual perception is hard-wired to perform that is found in “conventional” chart types, comparison in radar charts requires conscious thought to mentally project a sort of arc of rotation to map a value from one axis onto another, something we are not particularly adept at."

25 Easy Ways to Use Technology in the Classroom Although many technology-based teaching methods and resources effectively engage students and build their skills, many educators encounter difficulties. Maybe a specific technology is too hard to introduce. Or maybe it won’t run on your devices. Despite the challenges, you likely want to enjoy the benefits that education technology can deliver. Using the ones that best apply to you and your students, and keeping the condensed list on your desk for quick reference, consider these 25 easy ways to use technology in the classroom:

Bring virtual reality field trips to your school with Google Expeditions At the Bronx Latin School in New York City, teacher Katrina Roman says the topic of ancient history doesn’t usually set students abuzz. But this week, they took a field trip to ancient Mayan ruins using Google Expeditions, a virtual reality teaching tool built with Google Cardboard. Normally, their assignment would involve poring over photocopied photographs, but instead, they stood at the top of Chichen Itza, then examined detailed carvings at Tenochtitlan. Amid “oohs” and “aahhs,” the students shouted out details they noticed and shot hands up to answer Ms. Roman’s questions. Starting today, we’re bringing this experience to thousands of schools around the world with the new Expeditions Pioneer Program.

How to Make an Interactive Network Visualization Networks! They are all around us. The universe is filled with systems and structures that can be organized as networks. Recently, we have seen them used to convict criminals, visualize friendships, and even to describe cereal ingredient combinations. We can understand their power to describe our complex world from Manuel Lima's wonderful talk on organized complexity.

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