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What Your Students Really Need to Know About Digital Citizenship

The greatest software invented for human safety is the human brain. It's time that we start using those brains. We must mix head knowledge with action. In my classroom, I use two essential approaches in the digital citizenship curriculum that I teach: proactive knowledge and experiential knowledge. Proactive Knowledge I want my students to know the "9 Key Ps" of digital citizenship. 1. Do students know how to create a secure password? 2. Do students know how to protect their private information like address, email, and phone number? 3. While this information (like the number of brothers and sisters you have or your favorite food) can't be used to identify you, you need to choose who you will share it with. 4. Are students aware that some private things may show up in photographs (license plates or street signs), and that they may not want to post those pictures? 5. Do students understand copyright, Creative Commons, and how to generate a license for their own work? 6. 7. 8. 9.

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/digital-citizenship-need-to-know-vicki-davis

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A Look at 6 Digital Citizenship Myths That Must Be Dispelled When digital citizenship cemented itself into the public consciousness only a few years ago, it definitely had its critics. That remains true even today as we strive to understand what it means and how to practice it in our homes and classrooms. Many digital citizenship myths still have some of us doubting the intrinsic need for its practices. One thing is certain: today, we acknowledge that the digital citizen is a global citizen. Since the explosion of the Internet into our lives, there has been a need for a definition of checks and balances that will govern our use of it. While it certainly can’t be a governing set of laws that’s really enforceable, digital citizenship is still a framework for model behavior in all online environments and scenarios.

Growing Good Digital Citizens For anyone trying (like me) to get their head around the DigiTech curriculum, hopefully this can help get you. I plan on sharing some of the things I do in my school that address this proposed curriculum at a grade 2 level. My school’s Digital Learning Team has identified the area of “Promote and model digital citizenship and responsibility” as one of the areas for improvement after a staff survey on the ISTE standards showed that this was the areas where staff felt unconfident and had less knowledge than others. As a result, all students have downloaded an eBook (Common Sense Media’s Digital Literacy and Citizenship curriculum and workbook) that provides a lesson-by-lesson curriculum for teachers to implement with their students. I’m finding it to have some good resources but mostly it is a little dry. I feel a little more confident about this area than just following a text book, so I wanted to share a lesson I did with my Grade 2s about being a responsible digital citizen.

Moving Students From Digital Citizenship To Digital Leadership Moving Students From Digital Citizenship To Digital Leadership by TeachThought Staff Digital Citizenship has become one of the more symbolic phrases that represents the significant impact technology has made on our behavior and interactions.

Digital Citizenship for Elementary Kids: 6 Awesome Activities On one of our many walks to school, my 11-year-old son asked, “What are you blogging about these days, Dad?” I replied, “Digital Citizenship and elementary kids. So, what is it that kids do on computers most?” Global Digital Citizen Foundation 6 Sensational STEM Blogs for Your Students (and You) to Follow As STEM becomes more embedded in the educational consciousness, it's not surprising that more and more blogs on the subject are cropping up all over the Web. Teachers and students will always need tools, resources, and advice on the subjects that interest them. The... read more A Better Roadmap to Global Digital Citizenship Practices There’s lots to think about when it comes to ensuring guidelines for safety and proper etiquette for our digital students in their tech-oriented lives. What’s the best way to guide students towards the practices of global digital citizenship? Let’s begin at the beginning. Digital Citizenship without the “global” can be seen as 9 elements under three headings: Respect self/others

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4 Global Digital Citizenship Myths—Debunked! Today, we acknowledge that the digital citizen is a global citizen. Consider the explosion of the Internet into our lives. There has been a need for a definition of checks and balances that will govern this “new” world-wide technology. Enter the digital citizen. Digital citizenship is, as Karen Mossberger puts it, “representing capacity, belonging, and the potential for political and economic engagement in society in the information age.” While it certainly is not a governing set of laws or even enforceable, digital citizenship nevertheless defines the model behaviour of today’s Global Digital Natives.

Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum – Know your web – Good to Know – Google At Google we believe in the power of education and the promise of technology to improve the lives of students and educators -- leading the way for a new generation of learning in the classroom and beyond. But no matter what subject you teach, it is important for your students to know how to think critically and evaluate online sources, understand how to protect themselves from online threats from bullies to scammers, and to think before they share and be good digital citizens. Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe, and also worked with educators themselves to develop lessons that will work in the classroom, are appropriate for kids, and incorporate some of the best advice and tips that Google's security team has to offer. Class 1: Become an Online Sleuth In this class, students will identify guidelines for evaluating the credibility of content online.

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