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Eat. Live. Laugh. and sometimes shop!: 50 most beautiful English words.

Eat. Live. Laugh. and sometimes shop!: 50 most beautiful English words.
A few weeks ago I ran across a list, which I shared with you, of 33 Ways to Stay Creative. One suggestion was to read a page in the dictionary. That one stuck with me. It made me pause and think: When was the last time I even looked up a word in a real {not online} dictionary? A very long time ago is the answer to that query. I certainly do not fancy myself a wordsmith {an expert in the use of words}, but I am interested by words, especially unused or underused words. Where were the kids you ask? I have no idea. So today I bring you a few of my favorite words. Becoming - attractive. I'm off to gambol around with my children as we enjoy the halcyon days of summer! Cheers!

http://www.eatlivelaughshop.com/2011/07/50-most-beautiful-english-words.html

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