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List of French words and phrases used by English speakers

List of French words and phrases used by English speakers
Here are some examples of French words and phrases used by English speakers. English contains many words of French origin, such as art, competition, force, machine, police, publicity, role, routine, table, and many other anglicized French words. These are pronounced according to English rules of phonology, rather than French. Around 28% of English vocabulary is of French or Oïl language origin, most derived from, or transmitted by, the Anglo-Norman spoken by the upper classes in England for several hundred years after the Norman Conquest, before the language settled into what became Modern English. This article, however, covers words and phrases that generally entered the lexicon later, as through literature, the arts, diplomacy, and other cultural exchanges not involving conquests. Used in English and French[edit] A[edit] à gogo in abundance. à la in the manner of/in the style of[1] à la carte lit. à la mode à propos regarding/concerning (note that the correct French syntax is à propos de) adieu Related:  writing stuffdouggood

500 Storyboard Tutorials & Resources Once the script is written – how do you effective communicate the visual direction of your film? The answer is storyboards – essentially a scene-by-scene visual guide to the screenplay of the film. Storyboards are a vital part of the pre-visualization process, as well as being an important tool for preproduction and on the set. Developed in the 1930s by Walt Disney company for their animated cartoons, they grew in popularity during the early 40s. Here are over 500 storyboarding tutorials, resources and tools to help you better communicate your vision. Celtx Celtx is the world’s first all-in-one media pre-production system. 110 Celtx Tutorials FrameForge 3D The software creates virtual cameras, actors and objects in photo-accurate 3D scaled sets for previsualization. Toon Boom: Storyboard Pro This software is used to create storyboards. PowerProduction: StoryBoard Artist Productivity merged with creativity. PowerProduction: StoryBoard Quick

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email You will improve your English in only 5 minutes per day, guaranteed! 21 Responses to “100 Exquisite Adjectives” Rebecca Fantastic list! Top 10 first lines in children's and teen books | Children's books The boy and the old man arrived at the port at night. That's the first line in my debut novel, Close to the Wind, and I'm rather proud of it. The line doesn't shout out at you, but it does a lot of work establishing the tone of the book and giving you the setting and characters without any fuss. It's always difficult to know how to begin a book. Originally, I had a much bolder first line but during an editorial meeting it was suggested I lose it and start with the second line in. Of course, I objected. An opening sentence should draw the reader from their own head and take them somewhere completely different. It was a dark, blustery afternoon in spring, and the city of London was chasing a small mining town across the dried out bed of the old North Sea. 1. Is this the best ever opening line from a children's book? The first thing you find out when yer dog learns to talk is that dogs don't got nothing much to say. 2. A great book that's all about the voice and he nails it in the first line.

Word Spy Get Me Writing » 5 Interactive Fiction Authoring Tools EmailEmail If you want to get into writing Interactive Fiction (IF) it can be hard to know where to get started. So here is a list of five IF authoring tools so you can pick the approach that’s best for you. This is an update of a post I wrote way back in 2010. Because this is a long one, here are some quick links in case you came here for a specific tool:Twine Inform TADS Quest ADRIFT Twine (Mac, Windows, Linux) Summary Visual interfaceProduces HTML-based stories (that require javascript)Has limited support for basic programmingGood entry-level system Twine is the simplest way to create a text adventure, and therefore the easiest to use. The work is compiled in HTML format, and works on any browser that supports javascript (and has it turned on. The graphical interface makes it immediately obvious what is going on. Twine uses a graphical interface to show its simple text and links concept. If you want to “go deep” with Twine, you can add your own HTML and stylesheets. There is a caveat.

Unusual Words Unusual Words A by no means exhaustive list of rare, obscure, strange and sometimes funny words and their meanings that only seem to crop up in crosswords and dictionaries. Words that are used so seldom, you wonder who invented them and why. Home ~ The Stories ~ Diversions ~ Links ~ Contact Creating memorable fictional characters UWA Extension Fictional characters must possess sufficient strength of character to handle difficult dilemmas. In other words, they must be up to the demands of the plot. John Harman will show you how to create convincing characters, even those of the opposite gender. A story may be structured like a journey with a: Compass – the premise, theme, threadsMap – the plotEngine – the motivation of the protagonist (plus other central characters)Fuel – the dialogue The depth, dimensionality and authenticity of the story’s characters are vital. What comes first: plot or character? Students will benefit from watching the film ‘Thelma and Louise’ prior to attending this course. This course is held at Love House, on the Corner of Broadway and Cooper Street in Crawley. Lunch is not provided but you are welcome to bring your your lunch or to purchase from a nearby cafe.

50 Obscure English Words to Impress Your Friends According to the Global Language Monitor, English has more than 1,000,000 words (although even large dictionaries tend to contain about a third or a fourth), more than any other language spoken on Earth (that's more than thrice the amount of words in Spanish alone, another leading language in amount of words). Yet, most people only know 5,000 - 6,000! Of course, often, not much more than that is needed; English has an incredible amount of words with the exact same meaning. As said by About.com, English has only 250,000 - 300,000 when only "normal" words are counted; the rest are obsolete words, technical terms, or jargon that has more or less entered our language. A lot of these words are so bizarre, that you wonder why they were ever coined. Here are fifty of such words that never quite caught on. Abacinate: to blind someone using red-hot metal. Chance of using in conversation sometime: 1/10 Maybe if you're talking about a news story where this happens to someone, but highly unlikely.

Connecting Your Characters to Settings in Your Novel We’ve been looking at settings in your novel: the overall milieu or locale that your story takes place in, as well and the various locations your scenes are set in. I’ve encouraged you to take the time to come up with fresh, significant settings instead of defaulting to the easiest and first location types that come to mind, such as restaurants and coffee shops. We spend a lot of our time at work and home, and occasionally at those restaurants and coffee shops, but that is ordinary life. And while we want to show our characters in their ordinary lives (at least sometimes), readers don’t want “boring.” So the challenge for novelists is to come up with settings that are interesting. Settings That Trigger Emotion I had you think about places in your past that are emotionally charged to you. Does your protagonist, for example, have a strong emotional connection to one or both parents (who may still be living or have died before your story starts)? Conflict, Conflict, Conflict!

Cide Words (killing) BORED? Play our free word games – INTERACTIVE HANGMAN Have you ever noticed the connection between words like suicide, homicide, genocide, pesticide and fungicide? They all end in –cide, of course, but their meanings are linked too. The five examples above are not the only –cide words, however. The words below are divided into the following eight categories: Killing One's Relatives, Murdering Other People, Killing Animals, Killing Insects, Medicine (Killing Diseases), Killing Plants, Miscellaneous Killing, and Extreme Killing. Killing One's Relations Here are 13 words for killing members of one's family. Killing Other People – Murder Killing Animals – Slaughter There are terms for the killing of many types of animal. Killing Insects Medicines And Drugs That Exterminate In the same way that fungicide is used to kill fungal spores, there are thousands of medicines and drugs used to kill all manner of bacteria and diseases. Killing Plantlife Other Death, Annihilation, and Obliteration

101 of the Best Fiction Writing Tips, Part I What if someone went through the biggest and best blogs on the internet, and pulled out the very best-of-the best tips for fiction writers? That’s what I’ve attempted to do here. I can’t guarantee there aren’t some amazingly helpful writing tips that I haven’t included, but this is a good start. I’ve also tried to steer clear of really obvious tips like “show, don’t tell” or “make your characters unforgettable,” in favour of ones that are less often discussed. To learn more about the tips, click through to their original articles. Thanks to all these amazing bloggers for their valuable advice! Now, head over to: The Idiom Connection Medical and Health Idioms Idiom Of The Day - to be well and healthy My aunt is ninety years old and she is very much alive and kicking. The worker was alive and well after the accident. - to be healthy and physically fit My grandfather is ninety years old but he is as fit as a fiddle. - extremely pale My grandfather was as pale as a ghost when he entered the hospital. The woman in the hospital waiting room was as pale as death. - very near death The sales manager was at death's door after his heart attack. - physically healthy again My mother is back on her feet after being sick for two weeks. - an unpleasant fact that one must accept Losing the election was a bitter pill to swallow for the candidate. - bruised, showing signs of having been physically harmed My arm was black-and-blue after falling down the stairs. - to lose consciousness, to faint, to pass out The football player blacked out after being hit by the other player. - to lose control of one's emotions, to have a nervous collapse - to die

The Top 10 Elements of Setting In a Story No matter if you are just getting started or want to break into fiction writing, setting is a crucial element to any story. In order to create an imaginary world for your story, you’ll need to know the fundamental elements of setting first. Discover the basic elements of setting in a story from Between the Lines. Fiction has three main elements: plotting, character, and place or setting. While writers spend countless hours plotting and creating characters and then imagining their character’s arcs and dilemmas, often too little attention is paid to place. But setting is more than a mere backdrop for action; it is an interactive aspect of your fictional world that saturates the story with mood, meaning, and thematic connotations. Here is a list of the specific elements that setting encompasses: Locale. Plus, read more daily writing tips. This excerpt comes from Between the Lines by Jessica Morrell, from which you can learn more about the craft of writing. Buy Between the Lines now!

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