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10 Most Brilliant Social Psychology Experiments

10 Most Brilliant Social Psychology Experiments
Ten of the most influential social psychology experiments. “I have been primarily interested in how and why ordinary people do unusual things, things that seem alien to their natures.Why do good people sometimes act evil?Why do smart people sometimes do dumb or irrational things?” –Philip Zimbardo Like eminent social psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo (author of The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil), I’m also obsessed with why we do dumb or irrational things. The answer quite often is because of other people – something social psychologists have comprehensively shown. Over the past few months I’ve been describing 10 of the most influential social psychology experiments. Each one tells a unique, insightful story relevant to all our lives, every day. 1. The ‘halo effect’ is a classic social psychology experiment. » Read on about the halo effect -» 2. » Read on about cognitive dissonance -» 3. » Read on about Sherif’s Robbers Cave experiment -» 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

http://www.spring.org.uk/2007/11/10-piercing-insights-into-human-nature.php

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Daniel Smith I believe that people are mostly at different levels of awareness or consciousness in their lives and that we look at life through our own set of glasses. Most of us are functioning based on ideas and theories that have been passed on from generation to generation and so we are seeing the world through our ideas and not necessarily looking at reality. As a species we have advanced tremendously in technology and commerce, but one thing we have neglected to advance in is consciousness, the ability to be awake in the world. Today’s society has become extremely efficient at doing things with little or no awareness, we just run on auto pilot. As we become more aware (wake up), our consciousness will evolve to higher levels and we will live our lives based on the set of values that will benefit everybody and not just ourselves. We will begin to discover our true potential and realise that we are far more than what we appear to be .

The Ten Most Revealing Psych Experiments Psychology is the study of the human mind and mental processes in relation to human behaviors - human nature. Due to its subject matter, psychology is not considered a 'hard' science, even though psychologists do experiment and publish their findings in respected journals. Some of the experiments psychologists have conducted over the years reveal things about the way we humans think and behave that we might not want to embrace, but which can at least help keep us humble. That's something. 1.

What if consciousness is not what drives the human mind? Everyone knows what it feels like to have consciousness: it's that self-evident sense of personal awareness, which gives us a feeling of ownership and control over the thoughts, emotions and experiences that we have every day. Most experts think that consciousness can be divided into two parts: the experience of consciousness (or personal awareness), and the contents of consciousness, which include things such as thoughts, beliefs, sensations, perceptions, intentions, memories and emotions. It's easy to assume that these contents of consciousness are somehow chosen, caused or controlled by our personal awareness – after all, thoughts don't exist until until we think them. But in a new research paper in Frontiers of Psychology, we argue that this is a mistake. We suggest that our personal awareness does not create, cause or choose our beliefs, feelings or perceptions. Put simply, we don't consciously choose our thoughts or our feelings – we become aware of them.

10 Famous Psychological Experiments That Could Never Happen Today Here are the stories behind the nicknames of the NFL’s 32 teams—and what they were almost called. All photos via Getty Images. Getty Images The franchise began play in Chicago in 1898 before moving to St. Louis in 1960 and Arizona in 1988. What Annoying Situations Teach Us About Ourselves “Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to a better understanding of ourselves.” ~Carl Jung He was shorter than me with a mustache, and he was positioning himself in front of me, but just off to the side of the line. He was traveling with a young teen, probably his son. I knew that when the line moved, he would take one assertive step and insert himself and his kid into the line ahead of me.

William James Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact. William James (11 January 1842 – 26 August 1910) was a pioneering American psychologist and philosopher. He developed the philosophical perspective known as radical empiricism, and wrote influential books on the science of psychology, the psychology of religious experience and mysticism, and the philosophy of pragmatism. Quotes[edit] We are all ready to be savage in somecause.

10 Practical Uses For Psychological Research in Everyday Life People love to give each other advice. The web is full to bursting with all types of pseudo-psychological advice about life. The problem is, how much of this is based on real scientific evidence? Scientists discover we have a "force field" around our bodies and you can feel it — myscienceacademy.org Have you ever had the sensation of suddenly closing your eyes only to realize afterwards that an insect was heading straight for your face? Your body reacted instinctively before you had time to think because our brains are aware of the space around us. This phenomenon might have something to do with a personal force field that we have around us. Neuroscientists from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden have used a twist on the rubber hand illusion to help people actually feel this force field. Here’s the proof:

Pavlov’s Dogs by Saul McLeod published 2007, updated 2013 Like many great scientific advances, Pavlovian conditioning (aka classical conditioning) was discovered accidentally. During the 1890s Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov was looking at salivation in dogs in response to being fed, when he noticed that his dogs would begin to salivate whenever he entered the room, even when he was not bringing them food. At first this was something of a nuisance (not to mention messy!). Pavlovian Conditioning

Accept Yourself as You Are, Even When Others Don’t “What other people think of me is none of my business.” ~Wayne Dyer “You’re too quiet.” This comment and others like it have plagued me almost all my life. I don’t know how many times I’ve been told that I needed to come out of my shell, to be livelier, or to talk more.

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