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10 Brilliant Social Psychology Studies

10 Brilliant Social Psychology Studies
Ten of the most influential social psychology experiments. “I have been primarily interested in how and why ordinary people do unusual things, things that seem alien to their natures.Why do good people sometimes act evil?Why do smart people sometimes do dumb or irrational things?” –Philip Zimbardo Like eminent social psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo (author of The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil), I’m also obsessed with why we do dumb or irrational things. The answer quite often is because of other people – something social psychologists have comprehensively shown. Over the past few months I’ve been describing 10 of the most influential social psychology experiments. Each one tells a unique, insightful story relevant to all our lives, every day. 1. The ‘halo effect’ is a classic social psychology experiment. » Read on about the halo effect -» 2. » Read on about cognitive dissonance -» 3. » Read on about Sherif’s Robbers Cave experiment -» 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

http://www.spring.org.uk/2007/11/10-piercing-insights-into-human-nature.php

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Your Brain in Love: Scientific American Men and women can now thank a dozen brain regions for their romantic fervor. Researchers have revealed the fonts of desire by comparing functional MRI studies of people who indicated they were experiencing passionate love, maternal love or unconditional love. Together, the regions release neuro­transmitters and other chemicals in the brain and blood that prompt greater euphoric sensations such as attraction and pleasure. Conversely, psychiatrists might someday help individuals who become dan­gerously depressed after a heartbreak by adjusting those chemicals. Institutional review board An institutional review board (IRB), also known as an independent ethics committee (IEC), ethical review board (ERB) or research ethics board (REB), is a committee that has been formally designated to approve, monitor, and review biomedical and behavioral research involving humans. They often conduct some form of risk-benefit analysis in an attempt to determine whether or not research should be done.[1] The purpose of the review process is to assure, both in advance and by periodic review, that appropriate steps are taken to protect the rights and welfare of humans participating as subjects in a research study. A key goal of IRBs is to protect human subjects from physical or psychological harm, which they attempt to do by reviewing research protocols and related materials. IRBs are most commonly used for studies in the fields of health and the social sciences, including anthropology, sociology, and psychology. United States mandate for IRBs[edit]

10 Famous Psychological Experiments That Could Never Happen Today Nowadays, the American Psychological Association has a Code of Conduct in place when it comes to ethics in psychological experiments. Experimenters must adhere to various rules pertaining to everything from confidentiality to consent to overall beneficence. Review boards are in place to enforce these ethics. But the standards were not always so strict, which is how some of the most famous studies in psychology came about. 1. The Top 10 Psychology Studies of 2010 The end of 2010 fast approaches, and I'm thrilled to have been asked by the editors of Psychology Today to write about the Top 10 psychology studies of the year. I've focused on studies that I personally feel stand out, not only as examples of great science, but even more importantly, as examples of how the science of psychology can improve our lives. Each study has a clear "take home" message, offering the reader an insight or a simple strategy they can use to reach their goals , strengthen their relationships, make better decisions, or become happier. If you extract the wisdom from these ten studies and apply them in your own life, 2011 just might be a very good year. 1) How to Break Bad Habits

Daniel Smith I believe that people are mostly at different levels of awareness or consciousness in their lives and that we look at life through our own set of glasses. Most of us are functioning based on ideas and theories that have been passed on from generation to generation and so we are seeing the world through our ideas and not necessarily looking at reality. As a species we have advanced tremendously in technology and commerce, but one thing we have neglected to advance in is consciousness, the ability to be awake in the world. Today’s society has become extremely efficient at doing things with little or no awareness, we just run on auto pilot. As we become more aware (wake up), our consciousness will evolve to higher levels and we will live our lives based on the set of values that will benefit everybody and not just ourselves. We will begin to discover our true potential and realise that we are far more than what we appear to be .

Flow (psychology) Concentrating upon a task is one aspect of flow. In positive psychology, flow, also known as zone, is the mental state of operation in which a person performing an activity is fully immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. In essence, flow is characterized by complete absorption in what one does. Named by Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, the concept has been widely referenced across a variety of fields, though has existed for thousands of years under other guises, notably in some eastern religions.[1] Achieving flow is often referred to as being in the zone.

Experimental psychology Experimental psychology refers to work done by those who apply experimental methods to the study of behavior and the processes that underlie it. Experimental psychologists employ human participants and animal subjects to study a great many topics, including, among others sensation & perception, memory, cognition, learning, motivation, emotion; developmental processes, social psychology, and the neural substrates of all of these.[1] History[edit] Early experimental psychology[edit] From Clever Hans to the modern day - The Berkeley Science Review Clever Hans couldn’t do math, but he was really good at reading human body language. Photo via Wikimedia commons. In the early 1900s, scientific and public attention to animal cognition and intelligence was focused on the performance of one animal, Clever Hans the horse. His owner, a mathematics teacher, claimed that Hans could perform addition, subtraction, multiplication and work with fractions, among other skills. Indeed, Hans could answer math questions correctly (by tapping his hooves the correct number of times) with both his owner and other questioners, which led an investigative panel to conclude that this was not a case of fraud (as reported in the NYTimes: “Berlin’s Wonderful Horse: He Can Do Almost Everything but Talk,” 1904; “Clever Hans Again – Expert Commission Decides that the Horse Actually Reasons,” 1904).

The Problem of Perception First published Tue Mar 8, 2005; substantive revision Fri Feb 4, 2011 Sense-perception—the awareness or apprehension of things by sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste—has long been a preoccupation of philosophers. One pervasive and traditional problem, sometimes called “the problem of perception”, is created by the phenomena of perceptual illusion and hallucination: if these kinds of error are possible, how can perception be what it intuitively seems to be, a direct and immediate access to reality? The present entry is about how these possibilities of error challenge the intelligibility of the phenomenon of perception, and how the major theories of perception in the last century are best understood as responses to this challenge. 1. The Problem of Perception

William James Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living, and your belief will help create the fact. William James (11 January 1842 – 26 August 1910) was a pioneering American psychologist and philosopher. He developed the philosophical perspective known as radical empiricism, and wrote influential books on the science of psychology, the psychology of religious experience and mysticism, and the philosophy of pragmatism. Quotes[edit] We are all ready to be savage in somecause.

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