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Flipped Classroom - digitalsandbox

Flipped Classroom - digitalsandbox

Part 1: Flipping The Classroom? … 12 Resources To Keep You On Your Feet Welcome to another post rich in resources. If you have come here looking for links that will guide you to videos and multimedia to use in a Flipped Classroom that is coming in a future post. Perhaps you have tried a little Flip of your own and want to learn more. If you are beginning to investigate what a Flipped Classroom is, with the thought of possibly trying some kind of Flip yourself… then this is also the right place. I have researched and tried to find you the very best resources to get educators in all positions thinking about what a Flipped Classroom” really is”? Many educators are beginning to become aware of the growing teaching method referred to as “Flipping The Classroom”. You see, at first this definition does make a lot of sense, and like so many “best practices” I see great value in the idea. Yes, I am a proponent of incorporating various multimedia and online learning in a blended environment. The Twelve Resources To Better Understand Flipping the Classroom Like this:

The Flipped Classroom: Explanation & Resources The flipped classroom model, in which traditional teaching methods and the order of a student’s day are basically reversed to make use of resources online and/or outside of class while moving what we know as traditional “homework” into actual classroom time, has been slowly gaining steam around the country since its unofficial inception in 2004, but the recent onslaught of high quality educational resources being released from the likes of Khan Academy, MIT, and others has really kicked the movement into high gear. What is the flipped classroom model? Does it work? Background on the flipped classroom: The Daily Riff: How the flipped classroom was born The Atlantic: Flipped classrooms promote personalization in higher education The Washington Post: The flip: Turning a classroom upside down Articles on the flipped classroom in action: The classroom flip: a rural case Zanesville, OH teachers use technology to flip classrooms Homework stays at school in flipped classrooms Dean’s training resources

8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet? YouTube This might be the most popular tool teachers have used for flipped instruction. You don’t have to establish a class list to allow for student discussion. Other services, such as those that approximate a LMS, require a lot of preparation before a teacher can use it. You can edit the video online (somewhat). Evernote Tutorial as a Cartoon Trim and stabilize Swap audio tracks Change the look of the video (for instance, make it look like a cartoon) Add annotations Add captions Download the new version of the video for offline use It’s easy to share with colleagues, friends, and professional development organizations. I would assume that teachers might want to share their videos with other teachers or use them when they present at professional development conferences. Edmodo Schoology

There's More Than One Way to Flip a Classroom - Digital Education In a packed session this afternoon at ISTE 2012 here in San Diego, a panel of nine educators, as well as two moderators presented their ideas and experiences with "flipping" their classrooms. The session was led by Aaron Sams and Jonathan Bergmann, two chemistry teachers who pioneered the flipped learning model back in 2006. The pair recently co-wrote a book, published by ISTE and ASCD, called Flip Your Classroom. Defining what "flipping your classroom" meant was the first topic of conversation, which proved to be somewhat more difficult than you might expect. The flipped classroom has become somewhat synonymous with using videos to have students view lectures at home while in-class time is used for applied knowledge. Many of the educators talked about pre-recording certain topics that students consistently ask about, such as "How do I get to Google Docs?" "We needed to level the playing field for all students," said Dawn Sanchez, the director of the 9th-grade center for the school.

4 Ways Flipping Forces Fundamental Change - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - edchat, edreform, flipped classroom Email Share June 14, 2012 - by Susan Lucille Davis 0 Email Share Photo Courtesy of Flickr: kkimpel I generally like the idea of turning things upside-down if only to see what happens as a result. Flip #1: When and where should learning happen? At its core, flipping the classroom forces us to question the who-what-where-when-and-why of what we do. Flip #2: Why are we lecturing anyway? Too many teachers have confessed to me that they lecture because that’s what they think teaching is, or they lecture because the students won’t read assigned textbook selections and they have to deliver the content somehow (ironically, transferring one boring method of delivery into another). So, why do we feel compelled to do something that we know we do – let’s admit it – rather badly? Flip #3: How can we partner with parents? Let’s face it. Flip #4: Why not be more transparent? Flipping the classroom forces us to reckon with this kind of completely naked exposure of our teaching selves.

The flip: Turning a classroom upside down Roshan, her AP Calculus teacher at the private Bullis School in Potomac, told students that they would be learning their lessons at home with help from videos and other materials that she had made, and then would do “homework” problems in class. Roshan had “flipped” her class — a trend in teaching and classroom management that has been adopted by thousands of teachers across the country for a variety of different subjects. It is a reimagination of life in a classroom. The philosophy behind the flip is that teachers can spend time working with students who need their help in the classroom — and students can work together to solve problems — rather than sitting home alone with work they might not understand and with nobody to ask for help. Skeptics raise questions about flipped classrooms: How many subjects are really appropriate for this technique? “My AP Calc class was a really anxious environment,” said Roshan. Gutschick said she thinks her teacher has succeeded.

Flipping for fitness By Jason Hahnstadt Read more by Contributor The flipped learning model can be applied in physical education classes with great success. Physical education (PE) teachers are often on the short end of the stick when it comes to technology innovations in school. When the battle of the bulge is fought every day in our schools, the conversations are usually more about removing the symptoms of childhood obesity, like limiting soda pop in vending machines and offering healthier school lunch options, than addressing the true cause of the problem–lack of overall physical activity. I know what you’re thinking – “Technology in PE? While I admit that PE is likely the last educational frontier you would expect to see being reshaped by the digital revolution, this is exactly what is happening at my school. I’m no technological pioneer. It’s amazing what happens when you embrace emerging technology in school. Flipping my PE class was actually pretty simple.

The Flipped Classroom is Hot, Hot, Hot There are news stories and web articles about reverse instruction, or ‘flipping the classroom’, published just about every day lately. Here’s 15 news stories from the last 4 weeks focused on this instructional technology phenomenon. Many of these articles mention ‘the flip’ in their title (and for every one of these, there have been one or two additional articles that discuss the concept). In addition to listing these articles here, I’ve also created and shared a video and a Slideshare deck to help to bring attention to this powerful idea and spread the word about it to educators everywhere. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 11. 13. 14. 15. It’s exciting to me to see this high level of interest in this topic, since I’ll be presenting on the subject at the Campus Technology 2012 Conference in Boston in July in my session, “Flipping the Classroom – Succeeding With Reverse Instruction”. About Kelly Walsh Print This Post

Moving the Flipped Class « Educator I have not written for almost two weeks now. Half of the reason is because of writer’s block, another half because school is crazy, and a third half because of some family issues that came up unexpectedly. I opened up my blog a few times with intention to write, but I could not get anything to form. But that’s okay. It gave me time to reflect on other’s posts and thoughts while trying to get all of mine to fit in my head. There has been a lot happening with the Flipped Classroom recently…almost too much to list. The Flipped Classroom book by Jon and Aaron being published by ISTE had its release date moved up a month because of high demand.Ted-Ed launched.The Flipped Learning Network began.The Flipped Class Network NING passed 4000 registered members.The #flipclass hashtag on Twitter is exploding with links, articles, and connections. Plus, dozens of articles on the flipped classroom. Flickr CC, Viernest

To Flip Or Not Flip? To flip or not to flip? That is not the essential question. In assessing the optimal classroom dynamics, I would argue that we need to take a good look at what our classrooms look like right now, what activities our students gain the most from, what we wished we had more time for, and what things about our class we wish we could eliminate. Do I flip: yes. Would I recommend it: enthusiastically. But let’s start by rewinding for a minute, to my 2009 AP Calculus class. Running Out Of Time Worst of all, I felt that I never got to hear from my students because they were trying their best to digest the newly presented material. So I asked myself the same questions that I posed at the beginning of this essay: what is working, what is not, and what do I wish I had more time for? Planning In math, we often have the preconceived notion of a boring, rigid learning environment where the teacher lectures and the students do endless practice problems until the skill is mastered.

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