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Germanic mythology and religion

Germanic mythology and religion
Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a system of interlocking and closely interrelated religious worldviews and practices rather than as one indivisible religion" and as such consisted of "individual worshippers, family traditions and regional cults within a broadly consistent framework".[1] Germanic paganism took various forms in different areas of the Germanic world. The best documented version was that of 10th and 11th century Norse religion, although other information can be found from Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic sources. Scattered references are also found in the earliest writings of other Germanic peoples and Roman descriptions. The information can be supplemented with archaeological finds and remnants of pre-Christian beliefs in later folklore. History[edit] Pre-Migration Period[edit] Caesar[edit] Tacitus[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanic_paganism

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Norse mythology An undead völva, a Scandinavian seeress, tells the spear-wielding god Odin of what has been and what will be in Odin and the Völva by Lorenz Frølich (1895) For the practices and social institutions of the Norse pagans, see Norse paganism Norse mythology, or Scandinavian mythology, is the body of mythology of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition. Most of the surviving mythology centers on the plights of the gods and their interaction with various other beings, such as humanity and the jötnar, beings who may be friends, lovers, foes and/or family members of the gods.

List of Germanic deities In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from numerous sources, including works of literature, various chronicles, runic inscriptions, personal names, place names, and other sources. This article presents a comprehensive list of these deities. Gods[edit] Goddesses[edit] Enormous megaliths discovered in Siberia Click here to view the original image of 610x400px. By April HollowayHave enormous megaliths been discovered in Southern Siberia, or are they a rare product of nature?A series of incredible photographs have been released by Dr Valery Uvarov, Head of the Department of Palaeoscience, Palaeotechnology, and UFO Research of the National Security Academy of Russia, following an expedition to the mountains of Gornaya Shoria in Southern Siberia. The photographs appear to depict a set of enormous megaliths and Dr Uvarov is convinced they are man-made structures.

Norse cosmology The cosmology of Norse mythology has "nine homeworlds", unified by the world tree Yggdrasill. Mapping the nine worlds escapes precision because the Poetic Edda often alludes vaguely. The Norse creation myth tells how everything came into existence in the gap between fire and ice, and how the gods shaped the homeworld of humans. Yggdrasill[edit] A cosmic ash tree, Yggdrasill, lies at the center of the Norse cosmos. Three roots drink the waters of the homeworlds, one in the homeworld of the gods, the Æsir, one in the homeworld of the giants, the Jǫtnar, and one in the homeworld of the dead. Dís The annual Disting fair still carries the name of the dísir. A scene from the Disting of 2008. Etymology and meaning[edit] 'Britain's Atlantis' found at bottom of North sea - a huge undersea kingdom swamped by a tsunami 5,500 years ago Divers have found traces of ancient land swallowed by waves 8500 years agoDoggerland once stretched from Scotland to DenmarkRivers seen underwater by seismic scansBritain was not an island - and area under North Sea was roamed by mammoths and other giant animalsDescribed as the 'real heartland' of EuropeHad population of tens of thousands - but devastated by sea level rises By Rob Waugh Published: 23:32 GMT, 2 July 2012 | Updated: 10:49 GMT, 3 July 2012

Anglo-Saxon mythology and religion Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology. History[edit]

Sleipnir – Eight-Legged War Horse August 15, 2011 by T.F.Walsh Mythical Creatures Series As one of the most well known runice stone pictures in Scandanavia, the image below depicts Sleipnir, Odin’s horse, with a serpent twining between his legs, Odin on his back wearing a sword and holding a drinking horn. Finnish mythology Finnish mythology is the mythology that goes with Finnish paganism, of which a modern revival is practiced by a small percentage of the Finnish people. It has many features shared with fellow Finnic Estonian mythology and its non-Finnic neighbours, the Balts and the Scandinavians. Some of their myths are also distantly related to the myths of other Finno-Ugric speakers like the Samis. Finnish mythology survived within an oral tradition of mythical poem-singing and folklore well into the 19th century. Although the gradual influence of surrounding cultures raised the significance of the sky-god in a monolatristic manner, the father god "Ukko" (Old Man) was originally just a nature spirit like all the others. Of the animals, the most sacred was the bear, whose real name was never uttered out loud, lest his kind be unfavorable to the hunting.

The Walling of Asgard and the Birth of Sleipnir Summary How It (Supposedly) Went Down One day, some time after the gods built Valhalla (the hall where warriors killed in battle get to feast with Odin) and Middle-Earth (the world of humans), a large man who claims to be a stone-mason arrives in Asgard (the land of the Aesir gods).The stone-mason offers to build a huge wall around Asgard to keep out the giants (called Jotuns). But his work won't come cheap. As payment, he asks for the beautiful goddess Freyja, the sun, and the moon.The gods hold counsel and decide to give the stone-mason what he asks for, but only if he succeeds in building the wall in a single season, entirely on his own. If he doesn't finish it by the first day of summer, then the gods won't pay him. The stone-mason asks if he can have the help of his stallion, Svadilfari.

Aztec mythology Mictlantecuhtli (left), god of death, the lord of the Underworld and Quetzalcoatl (right), god of wisdom, life, knowledge, morning star, patron of the winds and light, the lord of the West. Together they symbolize life and death. Aztec mythology is the body or collection of myths of Aztec civilization of Central Mexico.[1] The Aztecs were Nahuatl speaking groups living in central Mexico and much of their mythology is similar to that of other Mesoamerican cultures. Sleipnir Additionally, Sleipnir is mentioned in a riddle found in the 13th century legendary saga Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks, in the 13th century legendary saga Völsunga saga as the ancestor of the horse Grani, and book I of Gesta Danorum, written in the 12th century by Saxo Grammaticus, contains an episode considered by many scholars to involve Sleipnir. Sleipnir is generally accepted as depicted on two 8th century Gotlandic image stones; the Tjängvide image stone and the Ardre VIII image stone. Scholarly theories have been proposed regarding Sleipnir's potential connection to shamanic practices among the Norse pagans. In modern times, Sleipnir appears in Icelandic folklore as the creator of Ásbyrgi, in works of art, literature, software, and in the names of ships.

Moai Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue.

The Parts of the Self Today, we tend to think of the self as having two or three components: a body, a mind, and perhaps a soul. These few parts form a coherent single whole that can be clearly and cleanly separated from its environment, at least conceptually. The line that separates self and other is fairly absolute and unalterable. In the Norse worldview, however, the self is a more complicated entity. While the Norse certainly had a concept of the self – there is no bland “oneness” in their perspective – that self is comprised of numerous different parts that are all semi-autonomous and can detach themselves from one another under certain circumstances. None of these parts quite correspond to the concept of a “soul” in the traditional Christian sense – an absolutely unique and nontransferable essence of a person.

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