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Germanic mythology and religion

Germanic mythology and religion
Germanic paganism refers to the theology and religious practices of the Germanic peoples from the Iron Age until their Christianization during the Medieval period. It has been described as being "a system of interlocking and closely interrelated religious worldviews and practices rather than as one indivisible religion" and as such consisted of "individual worshippers, family traditions and regional cults within a broadly consistent framework".[1] Germanic paganism took various forms in different areas of the Germanic world. The best documented version was that of 10th and 11th century Norse religion, although other information can be found from Anglo-Saxon and Continental Germanic sources. Scattered references are also found in the earliest writings of other Germanic peoples and Roman descriptions. The information can be supplemented with archaeological finds and remnants of pre-Christian beliefs in later folklore. History[edit] Pre-Migration Period[edit] Caesar[edit] Tacitus[edit] Related:  legend

Germanic Mythology: Texts, Translations, Scholarship Is the doctrine of the Trinity pagan? Zeus, Hera and Athena This is another commonly cited 'pagan trinity.' As with most, it's a random assemblage of three gods. "Later, Kronos forced himself upon Rheia, And she gave birth to a splendid brood: Hestia and Demeter and gold-sandalled Hera, Strong, pitiless Hades, the underworld lord, The booming Earth-shaker, Poseidon, and finally Zeus, a wise god, our Father in heaven Under whose thunder the wide world trembles." Rheia craftily substituted a stone for infant Zeus, a substitution which Kronos failed to notice: "She came first to Lykos, travelling quickly by night, And took the baby in her hands and hid him in a cave, An eerie hollow in the woods of dark Mount Aigaion. Athena continues the family tradition of abnormal births, springing fully formed from Zeus' forehead, clad in battle armor: "Now king of the gods, Zeus made Metis his first wife, Wiser than any other god, or any mortal man. At Random Notice especially the 'trinities' labelled as 'Greek' and 'Roman.' Diana Bus Herds

Norse mythology An undead völva, a Scandinavian seeress, tells the spear-wielding god Odin of what has been and what will be in Odin and the Völva by Lorenz Frølich (1895) For the practices and social institutions of the Norse pagans, see Norse paganism Norse mythology, or Scandinavian mythology, is the body of mythology of the North Germanic people stemming from Norse paganism and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia and into the Scandinavian folklore of the modern period. The northernmost extension of Germanic mythology, Norse mythology consists of tales of various deities, beings, and heroes derived from numerous sources from both before and after the pagan period, including medieval manuscripts, archaeological representations, and folk tradition. Most of the surviving mythology centers on the plights of the gods and their interaction with various other beings, such as humanity and the jötnar, beings who may be friends, lovers, foes and/or family members of the gods. Sources[edit]

Ancient paganism and the dangers of compromise Search and find articles and topics quickly and accurately! See different advanced ways to search for articles on this site. The following article was sent to me by my two dear friends Rami Abdallah and Qais Ali; may Allah Almighty always be pleased with them. Ancient paganism and the dangers of compromise: This section will discuss the Dangers of Compromise. In this section, we shall demonstrate that most of the practices of today's "Christianity" as well as most of its beliefs were only introduced into the religion as a regrettable outcome of an excessive undue willingness to compromise with the surrounding pagans in order to attain their support and conversion. The expanse of land between the river Nile and the river Euphrates was home to the Jews for centuries before the coming of Jesus . The following information has been obtained from the books "Bible myths and their parallels in other religions" by T. Let us start with the very symbol of Christianity itself, the "cross." The Cross:

Norse cosmology The cosmology of Norse mythology has "nine homeworlds", unified by the world tree Yggdrasill. Mapping the nine worlds escapes precision because the Poetic Edda often alludes vaguely. The Norse creation myth tells how everything came into existence in the gap between fire and ice, and how the gods shaped the homeworld of humans. Yggdrasill[edit] A cosmic ash tree, Yggdrasill, lies at the center of the Norse cosmos. The root in the Æsir homeworld taps the sacred wellspring of fate, the Well of Urðr. Animals continually feed on the tree, threatening it, but its vitality persists evergreen as it heals and nourishes the vibrant aggression of life. Creation[edit] In the beginning, there were two regions: Muspellsheimr in the south, full of fire, light and heat; and Niflheimr in the north, full of arctic waters, mists, and cold. Búri's son Borr had three sons, the gods Odin, Vili and Vé. Norse Gods[edit] The realm of the Norse gods, the Æsir, is called Ásgarðr or the "Court of the Ás". Völuspá 2

Witches fear being driven out of town following 'hostility from Christians' By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 10:51 GMT, 3 July 2011 It sounds like a horror story straight from medieval times. Two witches descend on an ancient market town - only to be targeted by terrified Christians calling for them to be burned at the stake. But for father-of-one Albion and his partner Raven, 39, this is no historical event - it is a modern nightmare. Hostility: Witches Albion and Raven claim to have been subject to a hate campaign The Pagan couple opened their shop The Whispering Witch in the quaint town of Alcester, Warwickshire, around 15 months ago and claim to have been subjected to a hate campaign ever since. 'People shout 'burn the witches' as they go past and we've had others urinating up the window,' said Albion, 51. 'I found a pile of wood stacked in front of the door one morning. 'We've also had letters quoting extracts from the Bible telling us not to 'promote the work of darkness' in 'their town'. 'I can only assume this is the work of Christians.

Anglo-Saxon mythology and religion Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed] The right half of the front panel of the seventh century Franks Casket, depicting the pan-Germanic legend of Weyland Smith also Weyland The Smith, which was apparently also a part of Anglo-Saxon pagan mythology. History[edit] Mythology[edit] Cosmology[edit] Deities[edit]

Finnish mythology Finnish mythology is the mythology that goes with Finnish paganism, of which a modern revival is practiced by a small percentage of the Finnish people. It has many features shared with fellow Finnic Estonian mythology and its non-Finnic neighbours, the Balts and the Scandinavians. Some of their myths are also distantly related to the myths of other Finno-Ugric speakers like the Samis. Finnish mythology survived within an oral tradition of mythical poem-singing and folklore well into the 19th century. Although the gradual influence of surrounding cultures raised the significance of the sky-god in a monolatristic manner, the father god "Ukko" (Old Man) was originally just a nature spirit like all the others. Study of Finnish mythological and religious history[edit] Cristfried Ganander's Mythologia Fennica, published in 1789, was the first truly scholarly foray into Finnish mythology. The origins and the structure of the world[edit] Structure of the world, according to Finnish mythology.

Native American mythology Coyote and Opossum appear in the stories of a number of tribes. The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. Algonquian (northeastern US, Great Lakes)[edit] Abenaki mythology – Religious ceremonies are led by shamans, called Medeoulin (Mdawinno).Anishinaabe traditional beliefs – A North American tribe located primarily in the Great LakesCree mythology – A North American tribe most commonly found west of Ontario in the Canadian Prairies, although there are tribes located in the Northwest Territories and Quebec.Leni Lenape mythology – A North American tribe from the area of the Delaware River. Plains Natives[edit] Alaska and Canada[edit] South America[edit]

Aztec mythology Mictlantecuhtli (left), god of death, the lord of the Underworld and Quetzalcoatl (right), god of wisdom, life, knowledge, morning star, patron of the winds and light, the lord of the West. Together they symbolize life and death. Aztec mythology is the body or collection of myths of Aztec civilization of Central Mexico.[1] The Aztecs were Nahuatl speaking groups living in central Mexico and much of their mythology is similar to that of other Mesoamerican cultures. According to legend, the various groups who were to become the Aztecs arrived from the north into the Anahuac valley around Lake Texcoco. The Mexica/Aztec were said to be guided by their god Huitzilopochtli, meaning "Left-handed Hummingbird" or "Hummingbird from the South." Creation myth[edit] Huitzilopochtli is raising up the skies of the South, one of the four directions of the world, surrounded by their respective trees, temples, patterns and divination symbols. Pantheon[edit] Bibliography[edit] Grisel Gómez Cano (2011).

Moai Moai facing inland at Ahu Tongariki, restored by Chilean archaeologist Claudio Cristino in the 1990s Moai i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.[1] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors (aringa ora ata tepuna).[2] The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most were cast down during later conflicts between clans. Description[edit] The moai are monolithic statues, their minimalist style related to forms found throughout Polynesia. Six of the fifteen moai at Ahu Tongariki Characteristics[edit] Eyes[edit] Symbolism[edit] Dr.

List of mythologies This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region. Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit] Central Africa[edit] East Africa[edit] Horn of Africa[edit] Somali mythology North Africa[edit] West Africa[edit] Southern Africa[edit] Arctic[edit] overlaps with North Asia, Northern Europe and North America. Asia[edit] Southwestern Asia[edit] Middle East, Persia, Anatolia, Caucasus. Ancient Medieval to Modern South Asia[edit] East Asia[edit] Southeast Asia[edit] Central and Northern Asia[edit] (overlaps with Eastern and Northern Europe) Australia and Oceania[edit] Europe[edit] Classical Antiquity[edit] Northern Europe[edit] Eastern Europe[edit] Southern Europe[edit] Western Europe[edit] North Caucasus[edit] Nart saga (Covers Abazin, Abkhaz, Circassian, Ossetian, Karachay-Balkar and Chechen-Ingush mythologies)Ossetian mythologyVainakh mythology (Covers Chechen and Ingush mythology) South Caucasus/Transcaucasia[edit] British Isles[edit] Americas[edit] North America[edit] Post-Columbian Folklore of the United States

Greek mythology Greek mythology is explicitly embodied in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts. Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature. Archaeological findings provide a principal source of detail about Greek mythology, with gods and heroes featured prominently in the decoration of many artifacts. Sources Literary sources The poetry of the Hellenistic and Roman ages was primarily composed as a literary rather than cultic exercise. Finally, a number of Byzantine Greek writers provide important details of myth, much derived from earlier now lost Greek works. Archaeological sources Survey of mythic history Origins of the world and the gods

Roman mythology Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. "Roman mythology" may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period. The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The study of Roman religion and myth is complicated by the early influence of Greek religion on the Italian peninsula during Rome's protohistory, and by the later artistic imitation of Greek literary models by Roman authors. The nature of Roman myth[edit] Because ritual played the central role in Roman religion that myth did for the Greeks, it is sometimes doubted that the Romans had much of a native mythology. Founding myths[edit] Other myths[edit] Religion and myth[edit] Foreign gods[edit]

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