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How to make soap at home: 5 tips

How to make soap at home: 5 tips
Until around 1916, making soap at home was commonplace. Using wood or plant ashes and leftover animal fats, families produced their own soap for cleaning their clothes and themselves. During World War I, when animal fats were in limited supply, German scientists developed synthetic detergents — and commercial soap was born. Homemade soap became less of a necessity, and gradually the practice dwindled. In recent years, back-to-the-landers and simple-living adherents have revived the homemade soap-making process — but it’s not only in favor with those who leave the big city for rural life or those with an anti-commercialist bent. Homemade soap is good for your wallet: you can make big batches of soap from scratch for less than it costs to buy bar after bar at your local drugstore, and you can reuse leftover bits to make new soap. Step-by-step instructions for making soap at home are widely available online and in various DIY books. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. More resources: Photo credits Related:  FOODS I WANT TO TRY

Make your own natural body lotion If you’re tired of all the chemicals and synthetic fragrances in most store-bought creams and lotions, you might want to consider making your own. Most people think that making creams and body lotions is difficult but it’s actually fairly easy. I frequently make my own and give them as gifts to friends and family members who seem to love them. If you can, I recommend that you keep an old blender, a small- to medium-size glass bowl, and a spatula that you use solely for making natural aromatherapy products. While you can use your kitchen blender, the beeswax found in natural creams can leave a residue on the blender and utensils used. Here’s what you’ll need: • 3/4 cup of pure oil (I like sweet almond oil since it absorbs well and doesn’t leave a greasy film. • 1 cup of pure water (or you can use rose water — available in health food stores) • 2 tablespoons of shaved beeswax (most health food stores sell plain beeswax. • A glass jar or small glass jars for storing the lotion That’s it.

DIY hand-milled soap With the holiday season growing ever closer, your party-planning mom will love a handmade gift that doubles as a special treat for guests. Homemade soap is a beautiful — and environmentally friendly — alternative to the bar soap purchased at the drugstore or grocery store. But making soap is a fairly precise process that involves working with a caustic substance (lye), and if you’ve never done it before, it can be intimidating. Making hand-milled soap allows you to experiment with soap making while bypassing many of the more complex steps in making handmade soap. The process of hand milling soap is also known as rebatching. Basic supplies for hand-milled soap: 3 bars of plain white unscented soapStainless steel or glass bowlCheese graterWater or coconut milkSmall saucepanWooden spoonAdditive (essential oil, natural fragrance oil, colloidal oatmeal, jojoba beads, lavender, etc.)Plastic container or candy moldsBaking rack Instructions for hand-milled soap: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Homemade Perfume A fine perfume can have a hundred ingredients — but sometimes simple is just as sweet. While you can make perfumes with combinations of essential oils, or with complex top notes, middle notes, and base notes, a delicate water-based perfume with a floral scent is deliciously direct — and an ideal gift for a romantic at heart. Not to mention that making your own perfume is a way to eliminate the harmful chemicals or preservatives often found in synthetic fragrances, such as phthalates, some of which have been shown to cause health problems. A homemade, all-natural, water-based perfume is the best Earth-friendly option. When making perfume as a gift, it’s important to keep in mind the recipient’s tastes and preferences. Basic supplies for making perfume: 1 1/2 cups chopped flowersCheeseclothMedium-size bowl with lid2 cups distilled waterSmall saucepanWashed and sterilized vanilla extract bottle, or another small colored bottle with a lid or an airtight stopper Instructions for making perfume:

Extensive List of Easy Home-made Household Products for Frugal Living Make a Frugal Living By Making Your Own! This is my extensive list of simple and easy home-made household products recipes...with a seasoning of frugal living advice, and an occasional dash of scientific explaination. Besides being fun to make, these do-it-yourself recipes will help you save hundreds or thousands of dollars per year. These may improve your health too (a good example is the Homemade Deodorant Recipe below). Click here to jump down to the home made recipes index. Mixing up these recipes will also give you the satisfaction of becoming more self-sufficient - which is one of the corner stones of making a frugal living. You will find many of these simple home-made alternatives to be much safer and more effective than their store-bought toxic alternatives. You can choose a product category from the menu below or use the search box to find more recipes. Frugal Mad Scientist At Your Service I enjoy reverse engineering products to create cheaper and safer alternatives. Less Debt.

Natural face care from the fridge? Facials are great for the skin, as they remove free radicals, get rid of oil and do wonders for your pores and your face's natural moisture. I, like many men and women out there, love the idea and pampering of facials, but don't trust the chemicals and artificial ingredients in the packets and mixes that are the most reasonable at the store. So I did some "Youtubing" and found a wonderful channel called MichellePhan. She has some great (and easy!) You will need: 1 Organic Egg 2 bowls A spoon Natural face wash A towel Take the egg and crack it. The benefit of the whites is that it gets rid of excessive oils and firms the skin. Before sharing this, I wanted to make sure this really works.

Easy homemade soap As the last generations of Depression-era children or back-to-the-landers take their leave of this world, their DIY skills go with them. When we try to learn from scratch, we soon discover that recipes in books don't tell half the story. DIY soap making and other skills slipping away I have never figured out why this knowledge started slipping away from us, but I am trying to re-learn some of the basics. I now make my own soap, hand lotion, yogurt and bread. My soap recipe is customized to use full bottles of most of the oils, so you don't have a lot of inventory lying around, and you don't have to do a lot of measuring. Making homemade soap can be dangerous Before we begin, let me stress that soap-making can be dangerous. Here is some general homemade soap information Soap is made in two parts, lye and water, plus a mixture of oils. The oils must be gently heated. Lye is VERY caustic, so don't get any on your skin. You will also need a mold. Homemade soap: The hardest step Pour into mold.

The kitchen spa Help your skin survive unpredictable weather with these two essential steps: exfoliation and moisturization. Skin-cell buildup leads to dryness, poor circulation and blemishes. Exfoliation eliminates these dead cells, revealing fresh skin that is better able to absorb moisture. Food: Avocado Purpose: Moisturizer The scoop: Loaded with vitamins A, B, C and E, as well as potassium and fat, avocado is the perfect moisturizer. Recipe: Take a spent avocado peel and using gentle upward strokes, lightly massage your face with the inside of the peel. Food: Cucumber The scoop: Cucumbers contain compounds known to tighten pores and reduce inflammation, which is why they’re the classic choice for minimizing puffiness around the eyes. Recipe: Puree 1 tablespoon each of cucumber and parsley. Food: Oatmeal Purpose: Exfoliant and moisturizer The scoop: Oats are especially soothing for wind-worn or itchy skin, due to their anti-inflammatory properties. Food: Peach Purpose: Exfoliant Food: Strawberry

Dessert, Re-Designed Trends in sweets come and go, but for some time now it seems Americans have been moving beyond the notion of dessert with every meal in favor of the occasional premium indulgence. With high-quality ingredients, customizable options and upscale twists on traditional items, the newest franchises are offering treats that satisfy refined tastes--and betting they'll be more than just the flavor of the month. Of all the love-hate relationships Americans have--Facebook, celebrities, soccer--the most fraught is our relationship with sugar. We've embraced it, rejected it, distilled it, created dozens of substitutes for it--and still consume about 75 pounds of it per person every year. In the franchising world, entire segments rise and fall on the public's attitudes toward sugar. While that may seem counterintuitive--and a recipe for disaster among an increasingly obese population--the new concepts may actually demonstrate an evolution in the public's conclusions about sugar.

Gardening through the seasons Eating fresh food from your garden is a bit like drinking good coffee: Once you’ve had it, you can never go back to drinking freeze-dried instant or to eating tasteless fare from the frozen food aisle. But what if your growing season is woefully short? (When I lived in a Colorado mountain town at an altitude of 8,750 feet, we joked that the seasons were composed of “July, August, and winter.”) Spring Start your seedlings indoors a month or two before the date of your last frost. Don’t get frosted! Summer Keep sowing. Keep weeding. Plant veggies for fall. Keep picking. Fall Grow cool-weather-loving greens under your cold frame, if your area’s climate allows. Save cash and precious genes by saving seeds. seed packets in a jar in the refrigerator. Winter Enjoy the food you’ve stored. Depending on where you live, you might still be plucking salads from your cold frame. Go ahead and try your hand at an indoor herb garden. Make your “fireside read” a book about sustainable food. See also:

{Recipes} Homemade Summer Popsicles & Free Printables! It’s summer time and what better way to cool off than with homemade popsicles! These are my two favorite popsicle recipes and have never been able to pick which one I liked better, the strawberry coconut or the honeydew lime, so I decided to share them both with you! Need a reason to make these popsicles? Make for dessert at the summer BBQHave as an afternoon treat with your kidsPlanning a summer birthday party? Not only are both recipes easy peasy, but your kids will love them and so will you! Strawberry Coconut Popsicle Recipe PRINT Recipe {Recipe adapted from With Style and Grace} Ingredients 1 cup strawberries1 cup blueberries1 can light coconut milk1 cups water1 cup apple juice1/2 cup honey5 ounce Dixie cups20-30 Popsicle sticks Directions Add strawberries, blueberries, coconut milk, water, apple juice and honey in a blender. Place in the freezer for 30 minutes (set your timer), insert your wooden sticks, and continue to freeze until the popsicles are completely frozen, about 6 hours.

The Frugal Life News: Make Your Own Antimicrobial Spray I've been making my countertop and bathroom sprays for many years. Now there are many recipes for homemade cleaners and that's an exciting thing! People are now more aware of the dangers of cleaning supplies and the Make Cleaning Products Safe Campaign gives us a way to participate in encouraging the manufacturers to inform the public what is in their cleaners. The post on Toxic Dryer Sheets & Cleaning Supplies makes us well aware of the dangers of these toxic products so it's nice to see more natural ones coming into the marketplace. 20 drops Lavender Fine Essential Oil20 drops Tea Tree Essential Oil10 drops Lemon Essential Oil There's a long list of Uses For Tee Tree Oil.

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