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Is Google Making Us Stupid?

Is Google Making Us Stupid?
The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level. The Internet promises to have particularly far-reaching effects on cognition. When the Net absorbs a medium, that medium is re-created in the Net’s image. The Net’s influence doesn’t end at the edges of a computer screen, either. Never has a communications system played so many roles in our lives—or exerted such broad influence over our thoughts—as the Internet does today.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/

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