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Animal Farm

Animal Farm
Animal Farm is an allegorical and dystopian novel by George Orwell, published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalin era in the Soviet Union.[1] Orwell, a democratic socialist,[2] was an outspoken critic of Joseph Stalin and, especially after experiences with the NKVD and the Spanish Civil War, he was actively opposed to the controversial ideology of Stalinism.[3] The Soviet Union, he believed, had become a brutal dictatorship, built upon a cult of personality and enforced by a reign of terror. In a letter to Yvonne Davet, Orwell described Animal Farm as a satirical tale against Stalin "un conte satirique contre Staline", and in his essay "Why I Write" (1946), he wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he had tried, with full consciousness of what he was doing, "to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole". Plot summary Characters Pigs Humans Origin Related:  Books | Authorslibros recomendados / Recommended books

The Metamorphosis The Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung, also sometimes translated as The Transformation) is a novella by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915. It has been cited as one of the seminal works of fiction of the 20th century and is studied in colleges and universities across the Western world. The story begins with a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, waking to find himself transformed (metamorphosed) into a large, monstrous insect-like creature. The cause of Samsa's transformation is never revealed, and Kafka himself never gave an explanation. The rest of Kafka's novella deals with Gregor's attempts to adjust to his new condition as he deals with being burdensome to his parents and sister, who are repulsed by the horrible, verminous creature Gregor has become. Plot[edit] Part I[edit] One day, Gregor Samsa, a traveling salesman, wakes up to find himself transformed into an ungeheures Ungeziefer, literally "monstrous vermin", often interpreted as a giant bug or insect. Part II[edit] Mr. Mr.

Nineteen Eighty-Four History and title[edit] A 1947 draft manuscript of the first page of Nineteen Eighty-Four, showing the editorial development. The Last Man in Europe was an early title for the novel but in a letter dated 22 October 1948 to his publisher Fredric Warburg, eight months before publication, Orwell wrote about hesitating between The Last Man in Europe and Nineteen Eighty-Four.[14] Warburg suggested changing the main title to a more commercial one.[15] Copyright status[edit] The novel will be in the public domain in the European Union and Russia in 2021 and in the United States in 2044.[21] It is already in the public domain in Canada;[22] South Africa,[23] Argentina[24] Australia,[25] and Oman.[26] Background[edit] The banner of the Party in the 1984 film adaptation of the book (I) the upper-class Inner Party, the elite ruling minority, who make up 2% of the population. As the government, the Party controls the population with four ministries: Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Principal characters[edit]

George Orwell English author and journalist Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950),[1] better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic, whose work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.[2][3] Life Early years Blair family home at Shiplake, Oxfordshire Eric Arthur Blair was born on 25 June 1903 in Motihari, Bihar, British India.[7] His great-grandfather, Charles Blair, was a wealthy country gentleman in Dorset who married Lady Mary Fane, daughter of the Earl of Westmorland, and had income as an absentee landlord of plantations in Jamaica.[8] His grandfather, Thomas Richard Arthur Blair, was a clergyman.[9] Although the gentility passed down the generations, the prosperity did not; Eric Blair described his family as "lower-upper-middle class".[10] In 1904 Ida Blair settled with her children at Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire. Policing in Burma Statue

Brave New World Classic 1932 science fiction novel by Aldous Huxley In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World as #5 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[2] In 2003, Robert McCrum, writing for The Observer, included Brave New World chronologically at #53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time",[3] and the novel was listed at #87 on The Big Read survey by the BBC.[4] Title[edit] O wonder! Translations of the title often allude to similar expressions used in domestic works of literature: the French edition of the work is entitled Le Meilleur des mondes (The Best of All Worlds), an allusion to an expression used by the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz[7] and satirised in Candide, Ou l'Optimisme by Voltaire (1759). History[edit] Huxley said that Brave New World was inspired by the utopian novels of H. Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Bernard Marx, a sleep-learning specialist at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. Benito Hoover, Another of Lenina's lovers.

Au Bonheur des Dames Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Contexte historique[modifier | modifier le code] Genèse et sources[modifier | modifier le code] Dès l'automne de l'année 1868, le projet d'Émile Zola d'écrire une grande fresque sur l'ascension sociale d'une famille est clairement établi. Lorsqu'il écrit Pot-Bouille en 1881, il le conçoit comme le premier épisode du roman suivant[6]. Manuscrit d’Au Bonheur des Dames. Sa documentation sur le sujet commence dès 1881: article du Figaro du 23 mars 1881 sur les grands bazars, la faillite du petit commerce, le folie des achats et le problème du vol, article de novembre 1881 de Jean Richepin dans Gil Blas sur le calicot dans les grands magasins, article de janvier 1882 dans Gil Blas sur les demoiselles des grands magasins. Parution et réception[modifier | modifier le code] En novembre 1882, Émile Zola fait paraitre un extrait du roman dans Le Panurge , le Gil Blas l'annonce dans ses colonnes. Résumé[modifier | modifier le code] Chapitre I. Chapitre V.

The Day of the Triffids The Day of the Triffids is a 1951 post-apocalyptic novel about a plague of blindness which befalls the entire world, allowing the rise of an aggressive species of plant. It was written by the English science fiction author John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris, under the pen name John Wyndham. Although Wyndham had already published other novels using other pen-name combinations drawn from his real name, this was the first novel that was published as John Wyndham. It established him as an important writer, and remains his best known novel. Summary[edit] The narrative begins with Bill Masen in hospital, his eyes bandaged after having been splashed with droplets of triffid poison in an accident. After fearfully unbandaging his eyes, he wanders through an anarchic London full of almost entirely blind inhabitants, and witnesses civilisation collapsing around him. The polygamous principles of this scheme appall some of the group, especially the religious Miss Durrant. Influences[edit]

Breakfast of Champions Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday is a 1973 novel by the American author Kurt Vonnegut. Set in the fictional town of Midland City, it is the story of "two lonesome, skinny, fairly old white men on a planet which was dying fast." One of these men, Dwayne Hoover, is a normal-looking but deeply deranged Pontiac dealer and Burger Chef franchise owner who becomes obsessed with the writings of the other man, Kilgore Trout, taking them for literal truth. Plot summary[edit] Kilgore Trout is a widely published, but otherwise unsung and virtually invisible writer who, by a fluke, is invited to deliver a keynote address at a local arts festival in distant Midland City. Background[edit] In the preface, Vonnegut states that as he reached his fiftieth birthday he felt a need to "clear his head of all the junk in there"—which includes the various subjects of his drawings, and the characters from his past novels and stories. Adaptation[edit] Editions[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Island (Huxley novel) Island is the final book by English writer Aldous Huxley, published in 1962. It is the account of Will Farnaby, a cynical journalist who is shipwrecked on the fictional island of Pala. Island is Huxley's utopian counterpart to his most famous work, the 1932 novel Brave New World, itself often paired with George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The ideas that would become Island can be seen in a foreword he wrote in 1946 to a new edition of Brave New World: If I were now to rewrite the book, I would offer the Savage a third alternative. Island explores many of the themes and ideas that interested Huxley in the post-World War II decades and were the subject of many of his nonfiction books of essays, including Brave New World Revisited, Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Common background elements occur in both Island and Brave New World; they were used for good in the former and for ill in the latter. From the Notes on What's What:

L'Œuvre (Émile Zola) Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. Pour les articles homonymes, voir L'Œuvre. Claude Lantier est le fils de Gervaise Macquart et d’Auguste Lantier (voir L'Assommoir, roman où l’on apprend qu’il a été amené à l’âge de huit ans à Plassans par un vieux monsieur séduit par la qualité de ses dessins). Le roman est aussi une histoire d’amour et d’amitié. Margaret Armbrust-Seibert, « Victorine Meurent, prototype d’Irma Bécot dans L’Œuvre », Les Cahiers naturalistes, 1992, no 38 (66), p. 113-22.Patrick Brady, « La Théorie du chaos et L’Œuvre : peinture, structure, thématique », Les Cahiers naturalistes, 1992, no 38 (66), p. 105-12.

One Hundred Years of Solitude One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez that tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía, founds the town of Macondo, the metaphoric Colombia. Biography and publication[edit] Gabriel García Márquez was one of the four Latin American novelists first included in the literary Latin American Boom of the 1960s and 1970s; the other three writers were the Peruvian Mario Vargas Llosa, the Argentine Julio Cortázar, and the Mexican Carlos Fuentes. One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) earned García Márquez international fame as a novelist of the Magical Realism movement within the literatures of Latin America.[4] Plot[edit] One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) is the story of seven generations of the Buendía Family in the town of Macondo. Symbolism and metaphors[edit] The fate of Macondo is both doomed and predetermined from its very existence. Characters[edit] Amaranta

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