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Astarte

Astarte
Astarte riding in a chariot with four branches protruding from roof, on the reverse of a Julia Maesa coin from Sidon Astarte /æˈstɑrti/ (Ancient Greek: Ἀστάρτη, "Astártē") is the Greek name of the Mesopotamian (i.e. Assyrian, Akkadian, Babylonian) Semitic goddess Ishtar known throughout the Near East and Eastern Mediterranean from the early Bronze Age to Classical times. It is one of a number of names associated with the chief goddess or female divinity of those peoples.[1] She is found as Ugaritic 𐎓𐎘𐎚𐎗𐎚 (ʻṯtrt, "ʻAṯtart" or "ʻAthtart"); in Phoenician as 𐤕𐤓𐤕𐤔𐤀 (ʻštrt, "Ashtart"); in Hebrew עשתרת (Ashtoret, singular, or Ashtarot, plural); and appears originally in Akkadian as 𒀭𒊍𒁯𒌓 D, the grammatically masculine name of the goddess Ishtar; the form Astartu is used to describe her age.[2] The name appears also in Etruscan as 𐌖𐌍𐌉 𐌀𐌔𐌕𐌛𐌄 Uni-Astre (Pyrgi Tablets), Ishtar or Ashtart. Overview[edit] Astarte was connected with fertility, sexuality, and war. See also[edit] Related:  sumerMother-Earth Deitieslilipilyspirit

Nammu For the village in Burma, see Nammu, Burma. In Sumerian mythology, Nammu (also Namma, spelled ideographically 𒀭𒇉 dNAMMA = dENGUR) was a primeval goddess, corresponding to Tiamat in Babylonian mythology. Nammu is not well attested in Sumerian mythology. She may have been of greater importance prehistorically, before Enki took over most of her functions. An indication of her continued relevance may be found in the theophoric name of Ur-Nammu, the founder of the Third Dynasty of Ur. Reay Tannahill in Sex in History (1980) singled out Nammu as the "only female prime mover" in the cosmogonic myths of antiquity. [2] References[edit] External links[edit] Ninsun Myths[edit] In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Ninsun is depicted as a human queen who lives in Uruk with her son as king. Since the father of Gilgamesh was former king Lugalbanda, it stands to reason that Ninsun procreated with Lugalbanda to give birth. Also in the Epic of Gilgamesh, Ninsun is summoned by Gilgamesh and Enkidu to help pray to the god Utu to help the two on their journey to the Country of the Living to battle Humbaba. Names[edit] Ninsun is called "Rimat-Ninsun", the "August cow", the "Wild Cow of the Enclosure", and "The Great Queen". Notes[edit] Ninsun was called Gula in Sumerian Mythology until the name was later changed to Ninisina. Ninsun was originally named Nininsina, according to Pabilsag's journey to Nibru. See also[edit] References[edit] Encyclopedia of Gods, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002John A. External links[edit] Ancient Mesopotamian Gods and Goddesses: Ninsumun (Ninsun) (goddess)

Artemis In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis (Ancient Greek: Ἄρτεμις) was often described as the daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo. She was the Hellenic goddess of the hunt, wild animals, wilderness, childbirth, virginity and protector of young girls, bringing and relieving disease in women; she often was depicted as a huntress carrying a bow and arrows.[6] The deer and the cypress were sacred to her. In later Hellenistic times, she even assumed the ancient role of Eileithyia in aiding childbirth. Etymology Didrachm from Ephesus, Ionia, representing the goddess Artemis Silver tetradrachm of the Indo-Greek king Artemidoros (whose name means "gift of Artemis"), c. 85 BCE, featuring Artemis with a drawn bow and a quiver on her back on the reverse of the coin Artemis in mythology Leto bore Apollon and Artemis, delighting in arrows, Both of lovely shape like none of the heavenly gods, As she joined in love to the Aegis-bearing ruler. Birth Childhood Intimacy Actaeon

Crystal invented that can store, release, and replenish oxygen on command In what sounds like the most efficient weapon that an alien race can threaten the human populace with, scientists at the University of Southern Denmark have invented a crystal that pulls oxygen from a room and even water. According to the researchers, only a bucket full of the crystalline material is needed for the effect to take place. The substance is a salt made from cobalt, and aside from rhyming, is capable of slurping up oxygen at 160 times the concentration of the air we breathe. Professor McKenzie at the lab. Christine McKenzie, the author of the study, says that the crystals work similarly to our own hemoglobin, which captures and releases oxygen into our blood using iron as a trigger. Of course, if a crystal can hold enough oxygen until it’s triggered to release, it could theoretically be used to replace heavy oxygen tanks — even underwater. If the crystal sounds too good to be true, that’s because — in its current form — it basically is.

Ninhursag In Sumerian mythology, Ninhursag (𒊩𒌆𒉺𒂅 Ninḫursag) or Ninkharsag[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] was a mother goddess of the mountains, and one of the seven great deities of Sumer. She is principally a fertility goddess. Temple hymn sources identify her as the 'true and great lady of heaven' (possibly in relation to her standing on the mountain) and kings of Sumer were 'nourished by Ninhursag's milk'. Names[edit] According to legend her name was changed from Ninmah to Ninhursag by her son Ninurta in order to commemorate his creation of the mountains. Some of the names above were once associated with independent goddesses (such as Ninmah and Ninmenna), who later became identified and merged with Ninhursag, and myths exist in which the name Ninhursag is not mentioned. As the wife and consort of Enki she was also referred to as Damgulanna or Damkina (faithful wife). Mythology[edit] Worship[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Michael Jordan, Encyclopedia of Gods, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002

Mami (goddess) Mami is a goddess in the Babylonian epic Atra-Hasis and in other creation legends. She was probably synonymous with Ninhursag. She was involved in the creation of humankind from clay and blood. [1] As Nintu legends states she pinched off fourteen pieces of primordial clay which she formed into womb deities, seven on the left and seven on the right with a brick between them, who produced the first seven pairs of human embryos. She may have become Belet Ili ("Mistress of the Gods") when, at Enki's suggestion, the gods slew one amongst themselves and used that god's blood and flesh, mixed with clay, to create humankind. Also known as Belet-ili, or Nintu. Jump up ^ Dalley, Stephanie (2009). Mother goddess Mother goddess is a term used to refer to a goddess who represents and/or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth or as the Earth Mother. Many different goddesses have represented motherhood in one way or another, and some have been associated with the birth of humanity as a whole, along with the universe and everything in it. Others have represented the fertility of the earth. Paleolithic figures[edit] The Venus of Dolní Věstonice, one of the earliest known depictions of the human body, dates to approximately 29,000–25,000 BC (Gravettian culture of the Upper Paleolithic era) Neolithic figures[edit] "Bird Lady" a Neolithic Egyptian ceramic, Naganda IIa Predynastic 3500-3400 BCE, Brooklyn Museum Old Europe[edit] Examples[edit] Egyptian[edit] Indigenous people of the Americas[edit] Aztec[edit] Anatolia[edit]

Fullerite: harder than diamond, and now made at room temperature It sure does suck to be diamond, these days. It seems like a day doesn’t go by that we don’t hear of diamond being bested in some way — despite its millennia-long reign as the king of all sorts of physical properties, diamond has fallen behind in many ways. In terms of hardness, an entire class of materials called “ultra-hard” have the gemstone beat, and in the case of super materials like graphene, the margin is not small. Still, diamond does have one big advantage over all these new fangled scientific rivals: the Earth has already done all the work of synthesis for us. All we have to do with diamonds is dig them up and cut them, making them an incredibly easy alternative to still-developing technological solutions. This diamond anvil (!) The material, called fullerite, is not actually new. Diamond tipped saw blades are a necessity in many industries and home shops — and they’re surprisingly affordable. Now read: New 2D material could self-assemble into a transistor

The 13th Zodiac Sign – Ophiuchus, the Serpent Holder In mythology, Ophiucus is identified with the healer Asclepius, the son of Apollo, who was able to b... In mythology, Ophiucus is identified with the healer Asclepius, the son of Apollo, who was able to bring the dead back to life. Realizing his power, Hades convinced Zeus to kill Asclepius with a lightning bolt, and he was placed into the stars as a constellation after his death. The constellation, Ophiuchus, has been known since ancient times, and is better known as Serpentarius, the Serpent Holder. Ophiuchus is depicted as a man handling a serpent; his body dividing the large snake into two parts, giving way to the symbol used today as an Asclepius – the medical staff. Astrologers have not included Ophiuchus in the wheel of Astrological signs because the Sun spends only about nineteen days in this 13th sign of the Mazzaroth. In reality, this was not the case. The sign of Ophiuchus is patterned after the original ‘Serpent Holder’, Enki, a Sumerian god - tax assessor, or levys taxes,

Cybele Cybele (/ˈsɪbɨliː/; Phrygian: Matar Kubileya/Kubeleya "Kubeleyan Mother", perhaps "Mountain Mother"; Turkish Kibele; Lydian Kuvava; Greek: Κυβέλη Kybele, Κυβήβη Kybebe, Κύβελις Kybelis) was an originally Anatolian mother goddess; she has a possible precursor in the earliest neolithic at Çatalhöyük (in the Konya region) where the statue of a pregnant goddess seated on a lion throne was found in a granary. She is Phrygia's only known goddess, and was probably its state deity. Her Phrygian cult was adopted and adapted by Greek colonists of Asia Minor and spread from there to mainland Greece and its more distant western colonies from around the 6th century BCE. In Rome, Cybele was known as Magna Mater ("Great Mother"). Cult origins and development[edit] Anatolia[edit] The eroded rock-statue of Cybele at Mount Sipylus, in an early 20th-century French postcard No contemporary text or myth survives to attest the original character and nature of Cybele's Phrygian cult. Greece[edit] Temples[edit]

Rhea (mythology) Rhea (or Cybele), after a marble, 1888. Then she hid Zeus in a cave on Mount Ida in Crete. According to varying versions of the story: Rhea only appears in Greek art from the fourth century BC, when her iconography draws on that of Cybele; the two therefore, often are indistinguishable;[10] both can be shown on a throne flanked by lions, riding a lion, or on a chariot drawn by two lions. Most often Rhea's symbol is a pair of lions, the ones that pulled her celestial chariot and were seen often, rampant, one on either side of the gateways through the walls to many cities in the ancient world. In Homer, Rhea is the mother of the gods, although not a universal mother like Cybele, the Phrygian Great Mother, with whom she was later identified.

The future of space suits could be in shrink wrap, not balloons Looked at from a certain perspective, even ultra-modern space suits look a bit archaic. They have the general aesthetic of a diving bell, like a steam-punk imagining transported into space. The diving bell itself was basically a huge pressurized balloon, a way of taking the atmosphere at the surface down into the depths of the sea, but it’s very difficult to keep a balloon inflated against the crushing pressure of the deep; eventually, the bell gave way to modern diving suits, and divers learned how to deal with the pressure changes through behavior and specialized equipment. That’s made diving both safer and easier and more accessible than ever before, and now scientists think we might be able to do the same thing for space. A team of researchers from MIT hope to use mechanical pressure to replace the pressurization of the balloon suits we use today, making suits both far lighter and less restrictive to use. Even this prototype Z2 suit from NASA is big, bulky, and filled with air.

The Divine Matrix = 1086 | Anunnaki Council In the previously published works of the Anunnaki Matrix Activation project, I have explained what all of the alphanumeric results are and how the Gematria is connected with the Anunnaki Matrix and the emanations of the Tree of Life that the Anunnaki planted on Earth. A collective consciousness that gives birth to specific patterns is a matrix/womb and there are countless ascended and descended matrices in the universe and ALL of the human matrices are related with some of them such as the Hellenic Matrix which is connected with the Lyran Matrix (more info here). ALL human matrices are WITHIN the root humanoid matrix that is known in our reality/matrix as the Anunnaki Matrix and anyone who claims otherwise can be considered a spiritual criminal that is trying to confuse human avatars about their origins. Read here the story of Inanna and the Huluppu tree: More information about the shadow of the gods here: Am I Michael?

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